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After seeing how much it costs to get stuff powder coated, I am thinking of buying a starter kit to do some small parts. I would like to know what kits and powders you guys are using, and how well they hold up/perform? I see that harbor freight has a gun, and Eastwood has a couple (not sure the difference between the single and dual voltage stuff). My mom is getting rid of an old toaster oven, and the parts I want to currently do are quite small and should fit until I get a bigger oven should the need arise to want to do larger parts.

So what are you guys using and having good luck with?
 

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I started a business off of just a simple Eastwood gun, a Small Sandblaster, and a OLD oven. Don't use the one in your house. I have learned and grew and now have a nice PBTP gun, and a large oven, and a Soda Blasting setup.
 

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I have the ES01-C powder buy the pound gun system and love it!!! It pays for itself after time. I also have a small sand blast cabinet and old oven I bought from a friend. You will not regret it!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Was looking at the Eastwood guns, but not sure if I should spring the extra cash for the dual voltage gun...what is the benefit to it?

Powdercoating is something I have been thinking about getting into for a while, and it seems like this would be a good way to get an entry into it and see if its something I enjoy doing for small jobs
 

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Physically the two EW guns are the same. The only difference is the adjustable kv settings. Start small and PRACTICE. Most important thing you can do is establish a good ground. I bought copper coated ground rod from a home improvement store, drove it into the ground, and ran a wire to a good clamp. Single best improvement I made to my process. Be meticulous on the prep and the rest will follow. I've shot alot of powder with a standard EW gun. Use it to this day. Good Luck. Feel free to pm me, I started similar to the way your describing and learned alot the hard way.
 

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Physically the two EW guns are the same. The only difference is the adjustable kv settings. Start small and PRACTICE. Most important thing you can do is establish a good ground. I bought copper coated ground rod from a home improvement store, drove it into the ground, and ran a wire to a good clamp. Single best improvement I made to my process. Be meticulous on the prep and the rest will follow. I've shot alot of powder with a standard EW gun. Use it to this day. Good Luck. Feel free to pm me, I started similar to the way your describing and learned alot the hard way.
If you don't mind sharing stuff on this thread for others who might be looking in or search it in the near future, that would be awesome!

Is it worth it and beneficial to step up to the dual voltage gun? What is the benefit of the higher voltage really?

Also, im not sure i follow what you did with the ground- I thought the kit comes with a ground that is attached to the gun or box?

For now, I would just be coating small parts i.e. carb, pulleys, valve covers, etc. so was just going to put them on an oven rack, powder them, then stick them back into the oven...Should I make sure the rack is bare metal to get a good ground?

For prep, I was just going to bare metal everything and clean well with wax and grease remover or lacquer thinner before coating.
 

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GOD
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prep....prep....and more prep!
get the eastwood and go play around....get some decent metal stock and pratice coating....try it flat, bent, dented...all sorts of ways to practice getting the powder even on the metal. try not to work in the same room as sandblasting to keep dust out of the air. also there are lots of tricks to doing multi color and clears and translucents......if you are just doing your own stuff you will be very happy with it. takes some time to make sure everything is sandblasted and cleaned up but its cool to be doing it yourself.
 

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I'm no expert by any means, but I have put out some pretty nice stuff. ^^^ This times 100. The ground rod is a dedicated ground, seperate from the machine you are using. I use both the ground rod clamp and the ground from the machine. Try powder365.com or caswellplating.com, both have forums with TONS of info.
 

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I got the Eastwood "kit" 7-8 yrs ago to do some parts for myself and friends, worked out great. I have coated parts as large as a rad. support with the aid of a movable heat source. For smaller parts I got a junk kitchen stove with a working oven for free.... I have used the sh!t out of this thing...:cool:
 

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search ebay and CL for used wagners and nordsons . there are deals out there ...........i picked up a wagner epg2008 for 250 bucks a few months ago , stand and all included ... i think the guy needed alittle crack money ....
 

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I started to do a bunch of powder coating back in the day. The thing that killed it for me, was I spent way more time cleaning greasy cruddy parts than I did actually putting the powder on and baking it. Nothing like someone bringing you boxes of parts that were on an engine that has had 40 years of baked on grime. Then when you wanted to charge for cleaning, oh man did some people raise a stink because other people on the internet charge X amount. I did so some stuff for some cars that won a few shows etc... I even built my own oven, it was 3' wide 3' tall, and 4' deep. All I used was the cheap eastwood gun. Now I have some friends that have a business that does it, and I don't fuck around with it anymore. I dismantled my oven, and boxed up my stuff, I still have a standard house oven and a small toaster oven for personal use, but I am not going to do it as a side job any more. The last things I did do:



 

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This^ People don't realize the prep time involved with certain parts. Big difference between a set of crusty valve covers than say, a brand new intake manifold. I lost my ass a couple years ago on some marine cover that were epoxy coated and eroded from the water. Didn't realize when I quoted that job was was really need to get them coatable. Turned out great, but I had way too many hours in it. I also have the standard Eastwood gun and a standard household range/oven. Like said above, the prep is crucial. Temperature control is key too, I installed a quality gauge inside the oven that can be seen through the glass. You would be surprised at how far off the dial is on some.
 

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Hey guys, thanks for all the responses! I have done some searching on my local classifieds for good used guns but came up short. I have done some research though, and it seems like the Eastwood kit would be the most ideal for where I am at right now. I understand its all in the prep, and since I am just going to start off doing only my parts I should be more then fine. I figure the Eastwood gun would serve me well to get into it, see how I like it, and how well I can do it, and if I want to go from there possibly step up to a better gun.

Im going to just start off using an old toaster oven that I have, but would like to step up to a bigger old oven (can get one all day around here used and working for $50)..its just a matter of having the space to put it, a compressor, and a blaster
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I got the Eastwood "kit" 7-8 yrs ago to do some parts for myself and friends, worked out great. I have coated parts as large as a rad. support with the aid of a movable heat source. For smaller parts I got a junk kitchen stove with a working oven for free.... I have used the sh!t out of this thing...:cool:
What kind of moveable heat source are you using? Do you have put it in a small room to kind of bake it or keep the area around it at the same temperature?

I wanted to powder my gas tank since the spray bomb paint held up like pure shit on it this past season, but I obviously don't have an oven big enough to do it.
 

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I'm wondering about the oven myself, do they sell an afforbable one that can hold like lets say a bike frame for size?
 

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I've had an eastwood kit for about 5 years and it works fine for my DIY stuff. Like most people have said PREP PREP PREP... Once you have spent 2-3 days trying to get the powder coat off a job that you phucked up from not prepping it well this will become painfully clear to you. If you are unsure of wether you have all the oils or grease out of something porous like cast iron or aluminum, put it in the oven first and bake it before you coat it till it. If doesn't smoke then it is most likely good. Powder coat will fish eye just like regular paint if there is oil present...and it looks like shit...lol.

Lee
 
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