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Dinosaur Mechanic
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Discussion Starter #1
I am going to look at a forclosure that caught fire two years ago and was repaired by a reputable company. New kitchen, back wall, roof, windows, drywall, wiring and that is just what you can see. Are there any concerns I should look out for? Bank won't tell you shit your buying these homes-forclosures- as is here in Michigan. Any advice good or bad I don't want to get stuck with a problem or a house that makes you sick.

Thanks for any help
 

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veritas aequitas
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usually when a house catches fire and is rebuilt they are built better the second time around then the first time.i wouldn't worry about anything.
 

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it has to be inspected, but some places have loop holes and some inspectors can be shady. i know some foreclosed homes are "as is" and nothing is guaranteed. im also looking in the foreclosed market near here, but i have family in the real estate business so they wont let me buy or invest in a home thats to far gone. also look into the foundation and heating system
 

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Doesn't everything have to be inspected & approved before it goes back on the market?
No it doesn't. Most forclosures are sold "as is" The bank isn't going to put money into something that they have already lost money on. They're trying to cut their losses, not add to it.

Look under the house in any open area near where the repairs were done for mold. That is a big issue these days. If the fire repairs were done in a timely manner, you probably don't have anything to worry about. It just depends on how long water from the fire sat there before repairs were started.
 

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I had a house that caught on fire once and the insurance company rebuilt it. Mine was a 3 bedroom brick home and only 1 bedroom burned, but the brick acted like a oven and it ruined everything in it. The house was stripped down to the bare framework(all sheetrock removed), the was deionized and parts were sprayed with Kilz. The company that rebuilt it did a good job imo, but after it was rebuilt, on a wet cold day you could still smell smoke inside of it. I thinkn that once the wood gets smoked up that the smell will always be there no matter what, so that is something that I would look for.
 

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Dinosaur Mechanic
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Discussion Starter #8
usually when a house catches fire and is rebuilt they are built better the second time around then the first time.i wouldn't worry about anything.
I don't think that is always the case, that's why I asked here on the Bullet!
Some good info here as always you guys rock!!
 

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I would be concerned about the water damage (mold issues) and did they have to put vent holes in the roof? (rafter damage). Does it have a basement? (check the floor joists above the fire damaged area). I would think a good inspector would find what out if anything was a miss.
 

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ck on a damp day, see if it "smells" like a burnt house
 

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I would be concerned about the water damage (mold issues) and did they have to put vent holes in the roof? (rafter damage). Does it have a basement? (check the floor joists above the fire damaged area). I would think a good inspector would find what out if anything was a miss.
x2.

Water damage and smoke smell. Those are the two main things. And like fireguy said, if they vented the roof, make sure it was repaired correctly.
 

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Dinosaur Mechanic
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Discussion Starter #13
thanks for the tips guys. Cant get a muggy day here for about 3-4 more months. Too much damn snow!!! I will check into a few different inspectors if I decide to make a offer.

thanks again,

Kirk:party
 

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ck on a damp day, see if it "smells" like a burnt house

That is what I would be concerned with. Smoke and odor gets everywhere. May cause allergic reactions. May not be there now, but I bet it comes back.IMHO
 

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Hire a reputable building /construction inspector, third party type, who will be working for you, paid for by you. If it is too good to be true then...well you know the rest.
 

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Hire a reputable building /construction inspector, third party type, who will be working for you, paid for by you. If it is too good to be true then...well you know the rest.
How about an air quality report also??
 

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RIP Dave - YB will miss you
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I would be concerned about the water damage (mold issues) and did they have to put vent holes in the roof? (rafter damage). Does it have a basement? (check the floor joists above the fire damaged area). I would think a good inspector would find what out if anything was a miss.
The OP said it had a new roof so I doubt they left holes in it.Mold is a non issue if the house doesn't have any exterior leaks allowing water to enter.

The only issue I see is a fire damaged house smells like a bonfire to me regardless of what is done to get rid of the odor.
 

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Deplorable old phuck
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I'd make sure I understood the disclosure laws in your State. If you have to disclose the inspectors findings to future buyers, they might not be as willing to purchase. You have to consider your resale limitations
Also, I would check with your homeowner insurance company. If you was to have a claim, total loss from fire, storm, etc, would you recieve a full value, or a lesser value from your loss, much like a car with a rebuilt/salvage title?
 
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