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So I was watching the video above, and the long/short of it was [according to the video] that the US had many British working on creating the first Atom bombs, but after we created them, we broke an agreement, and didn't share the bombs [or the tech I guess] with the British.



I was going to look into the comments below the video to get a little more insight on this, but they are disabled which makes me wonder at the authenticity/truth of the video.
 

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I would think it is very possible. I am guessing at that time the USA would have used any "grate mind" they could find to help with "the bomb". I know it was after WW2 but look at the German who designed the ICBM and the rockets ( pretty much an ICBM) that put us on the moon.
 

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Pontiac "big block"
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They were busy getting their shit pushed in, they had no time for that.
 

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Also, if its true, then what happened to the British scientist who help develop the A bomb? As in wouldn't they have brought what they learned back to Britain, or did the British scientist who worked on the bomb, all have accidents before making it back home?
 

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Germans were. Hitler's main scientist/chemist that was captured if I remember right. Otto (something) helped us finish it.
 

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The USA Manhattan Projectwelcomed the British gent Joseph Lucas electronics wizard extraordinaire and then oddly sent him packing for no reason

Lucas Electronics: Prince of Darkness, King of warm beer. They got tired of warm suds so they kicked him out of the posse...
 

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_contribution_to_the_Manhattan_Project

Britain contributed to the Manhattan Project by helping initiate the effort to build the first atomic bombs in the United States during World War II, and helped carry it through to completion in August 1945 by supplying crucial expertise. Following the discovery of nuclear fission in uranium, scientists Rudolf Peierls and Otto Frisch at the University of Birmingham calculated, in March 1940, that the critical mass of a metallic sphere of pure uranium-235 was as little as 1 to 10 kilograms (2.2 to 22.0 lb), and would explode with the power of thousands of tons of dynamite. The Frisch–Peierls memorandum prompted Britain to create an atomic bomb project, known as Tube Alloys. Mark Oliphant, an Australian physicist working in Britain, was instrumental in making the results of the British MAUD Report known in the United States in 1941 by a visit in person. Initially the British project was larger and more advanced, but after the United States entered the war, the American project soon outstripped and dwarfed its British counterpart. The British government then decided to shelve its own nuclear ambitions, and participate in the American project.

In August 1943, the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Winston Churchill, and the President of the United States, Franklin D. Roosevelt, signed the Quebec Agreement, which provided for cooperation between the two countries. The Quebec Agreement established the Combined Policy Committee and the Combined Development Trust to coordinate the efforts of the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada. The subsequent Hyde Park Agreement in September 1944 extended this cooperation to the postwar period. A British Mission led by Wallace Akers assisted in the development of gaseous diffusion technology in New York. Britain also produced the powdered nickel required by the gaseous diffusion process. Another mission, led by Oliphant who acted as deputy director at the Berkeley Radiation Laboratory, assisted with the electromagnetic separation process. As head of the British Mission to the Los Alamos Laboratory, James Chadwick led a multinational team of distinguished scientists that included Sir Geoffrey Taylor, James Tuck, Niels Bohr, Peierls, Frisch, and Klaus Fuchs, who was later revealed to be a Soviet atomic spy. Four members of the British Mission became group leaders at Los Alamos. William Penney observed the bombing of Nagasaki and participated in the Operation Crossroads nuclear tests in 1946.

Cooperation ended with the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, known as the McMahon Act, and Ernest Titterton, the last British government employee, left Los Alamos on 12 April 1947. Britain then proceeded with High Explosive Research, its own nuclear weapons programme, and became the third country to test an independently developed nuclear weapon in October 1952.
 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qk_zpjK3cTo&t=191s


So I was watching the video above, and the long/short of it was [according to the video] that the US had many British working on creating the first Atom bombs, but after we created them, we broke an agreement, and didn't share the bombs [or the tech I guess] with the British.



I was going to look into the comments below the video to get a little more insight on this, but they are disabled which makes me wonder at the authenticity/truth of the video.
Yes they did help and we did share tech on how to build them.
Delivering and detonating was a different story.
 

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Yes the Brits did contribute and with the later revelations of Soviet infiltration of MI-6 it appears to be a good move to deny Britain or anyone else for that matter, nuclear how to’s.
The British were so thoroughly infiltrated at that time that the KNOWN spy’s are listed alphabetically on Wikipedia.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:British_spies_for_the_Soviet_Union
 

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FDR forced the Brits to turn over all their war research as part of the Lend-Lease deal. He fucked them out of a bunch of shit.
 

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Yes the Brits did contribute and with the later revelations of Soviet infiltration of MI-6 it appears to be a good move to deny Britain or anyone else for that matter, nuclear how to’s.
The British were so thoroughly infiltrated at that time that the KNOWN spy’s are listed alphabetically on Wikipedia.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:British_spies_for_the_Soviet_Union
That's the most important point, right there. A lot of the hierarchy in British intelligence were Communists. They were motivated to defeat the Germans as much due to their loyalty to communism as their loyalty to Great Britain. This became apparent as WWII morphed into the Cold War, and led to the US having to pull back from sharing too much highly classified nuke info with the British.
 

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_contribution_to_the_Manhattan_Project

Britain contributed to the Manhattan Project by helping initiate the effort to make coffee on time and ensure all the actual nuclear scientists received sufficient hydration. At the time, members of the UK were pushing tea as an alternative to the more accepted coffee. Lord Castlebum (of Lee's, upon Thames), was politely told to "remove that putrid liquid from this building at once" at which time he quit and returned to England, which signalled the end of the British assistance to the Manhattan project.

Had to clarify a couple points for you.
You're welcome.
 
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