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I am building a 396 sbc with a pair of 62's from turbonetics for my wife`s street car. It won`t see time at the track. They are water cooled. Typically I would machine and weld a set of bungs to go on the legs of the electric water pump and dump the water exiting from the turbos back into the cooling system above or after the thermostat. It seems to work fine, but is there a better way. Thank-you
 

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I am building a 396 sbc with a pair of 62's from turbonetics for my wife`s street car. It won`t see time at the track. They are water cooled. Typically I would machine and weld a set of bungs to go on the legs of the electric water pump and dump the water exiting from the turbos back into the cooling system above or after the thermostat. It seems to work fine, but is there a better way. Thank-you
On a SBF there is a short bypass hose from the thermostat housing back to the water pump. Let's water circulate from the engine back to the pump when the thermostat is closed. I run 2 water cooled Garrett turbos and used this "loop" to move water from thru a tee to the turbos then back thru another tee to the pump. Doesn't take much water. You can also look at the heat hose circuit and take water from that.
 

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Is watercooling the turbo's even really needed?
Some non-ball bearing turbo models from BorgWarner didn't need it and I now run their EFR without watercooling ("watercooling is advised") and it seems to don't mind either.
Could save a lot of lines and clutter..?
 

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Is watercooling the turbo's even really needed?
Some non-ball bearing turbo models from BorgWarner didn't need it and I now run their EFR without watercooling ("watercooling is advised") and it seems to don't mind either.
Could save a lot of lines and clutter..?
It depends. The water helps keeps the bearing and seal temperatures from getting too high and carbonizing the oil. Not every application needs it but the manufacturer wouldn't have gone thru all of that trouble just to make it complicated for the users.
 

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It depends. The water helps keeps the bearing and seal temperatures from getting too high and carbonizing the oil. Not every application needs it but the manufacturer wouldn't have gone thru all of that trouble just to make it complicated for the users.
It isnt complicated...they just gave their users more options.

It's their choice whether to run it or not.

If the engine will see extended periods under load/boost, then water is probably a very good addition.

if not...then it probably wont matter much.

Both would assume some common sense when driving too, and good quality oil etc.
 

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Pretty much no actual works race car ever runs water cooling, ie look at WRC cars, LeMans cars, etc- Oil cooled only. But they are turbos generally designed from the outset like that.
Older Group A cars though, almost always the road version was water cooled core, so they just ran without the lines for the race/rally versions.

When I've seen EFRs on rallycross cars etc they run without the water cooling.

The only exception I've seen to the above, is some (not all) the Fiesta R2s keep the water cooling linked up.

The only cars I know of that has issues without the water cooling fitted is some Garrett GT series as the bearing housings are plastic and don't handle heat well. What ones have that I can't remember as I never run them.
 
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