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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just read this on another site. Is there anyone who is samrt about the laws for towing trailers with a truck and a Motorhome?

If everyone doesn't know the tow laws for an RV, here they are. It is an RV and regular tags are all you need until you hook a trailer with a race car of any kind to it and then it turns in to a property moving vehicle. Now you will need a CDL class A license, weighted tags and total vehicle and trailer length can not exceed 60 feet. If you are caught without these requirements you will be ticketed for the sum of around $600 to $800 dollars and made to leave your trailer where it sits. This is not a new law, just being enforced more and more. One officer got 3 different drivers last month on I-40 and another caught 2 on I-85 that I am aware of.

About 10 yrs ago a bunch of us got with the SC DOT and SC Hwy Patrol and they explained the laws. If you tow a race car across state lines with the intent to make money and it is a business that is interstate commerce and you need a CDL and all that goes with it. But if you race for a hobby and pay taxes on your winnings it is a hobby and you don't need any of that. These are Federal Laws and I don't think they are different state to state. Anyone smart and up to date on these laws? RM
 

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I just read this on another site. Is there anyone who is samrt about the laws for towing trailers with a truck and a Motorhome?

If everyone doesn't know the tow laws for an RV, here they are. It is an RV and regular tags are all you need until you hook a trailer with a race car of any kind to it and then it turns in to a property moving vehicle. Now you will need a CDL class A license, weighted tags and total vehicle and trailer length can not exceed 60 feet. If you are caught without these requirements you will be ticketed for the sum of around $600 to $800 dollars and made to leave your trailer where it sits. This is not a new law, just being enforced more and more. One officer got 3 different drivers last month on I-40 and another caught 2 on I-85 that I am aware of.

About 10 yrs ago a bunch of us got with the SC DOT and SC Hwy Patrol and they explained the laws. If you tow a race car across state lines with the intent to make money and it is a business that is interstate commerce and you need a CDL and all that goes with it. But if you race for a hobby and pay taxes on your winnings it is a hobby and you don't need any of that. These are Federal Laws and I don't think they are different state to state. Anyone smart and up to date on these laws? RM
i carry my tax from year before and show i pay taxes on winnings.dot let me go on that. i am 77 ft long with motorhome and trailer
 

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It seems that this topic comes up all the time. We go to Florida 4 or 5 times a year, we are 66.5 feet long. We called Florida D.O.T. and asked them exactly what we were required to have and they said that the only thing we needed was the overlength permit. 20 bucks good for 1 year.Nothing else was required as long as we were a registered RV. They didnt care one bit about a race car inside the trailer. We have been all over, we have even be right beside Florida D.O.T and they never once have given us a second glance.
We even went through all the trouble of taking the lettering off of our trailer just to find out that as soon as we got to Bradenton about 500 trailers all lettered up, and no one had any problems from wherever they traveled from. Now what the Florida D.O.T. did tell us they were watching the big Toter Homes with the stacker trailers only because they had tons of complaints about speeding and cutting people off, basicly driving like fools.
I dont know I guess maybe its better to be safe than sorry.:confused::confused:
 

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Here is the problem, so many different stories. I know Thomas Myers got stopped in Texas, on his way to Budds Creek. He has a 34ft Show Hauler coach and a 36ft liftgate stacker, total length is over 80ft. The officer that stopped him in Texas, said that even though the rig is a registered motorhome and a CDL is not required, the length of the trailer was the problem. He said that any trailer, longer than 24ft, towed behind a motorhome, required a non-CDL class A license. Getting an "A" class license, requires you taking a written test and a road test, in your rig, but it is NOT a CDL. The officer gave Thomas a ticket and let him go, but I have no idea how much the ticket was. We talk frequently and I would think he would have mentioned it, if the ticket was very expensive.

Monte Smith
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This guy said NC law is 60 ft and they will not give you a permit for being over. I checked and NC law says 60 ft total for a RV with trailer. My buddy towed pusher MH and trailer 74 ft for several years running IHRA national events and never had a problem. RM
 

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Florida has updated their law. You can have stickers as long as you are not "sponsored" I'm SURE none of you are and don't mind telling that to DOT, lol.

Here's the new law, sorry it's so long but it is a law after all. It can't be simple.

S2296 GENERAL BILL by Posey; (CO-INTRODUCERS) Bullard
Commercial Motor Vehicles [EPCC]; Exempts certain vehicles that
occasionally transport personal property to and from closed-course
motorsport facilities from the definition of "commercial motor vehicle"
for the purposes of statutory provisions relating to state uniform
traffic control and statutory provisions governing motor vehicle
licenses and driver's licenses, etc. EFFECTIVE DATE: 07/01/2008.
- - - - - - - -

CODING: Words stricken are deletions; words underlined are additions.
1
2
An act relating to commercial motor vehicles; amending s.
3
316.003, F.S.; exempting certain vehicles that
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occasionally transport personal property to and from
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closed-course motorsport facilities from the definition of
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"commercial motor vehicle" for purposes of statutory
7
provisions relating to state uniform traffic control;
8
amending ss. 320.01 and 322.01, F.S.; exempting certain
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vehicles that occasionally transport personal property to
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and from closed-course motorsport facilities from the
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definition of "commercial motor vehicle" for purposes of
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statutory provisions governing motor vehicle licenses and
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driver's licenses; providing an effective date.
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Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
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17
Section 1. Subsection (66) of section 316.003, Florida
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Statutes, is amended to read:
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316.003 Definitions.--The following words and phrases, when
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used in this chapter, shall have the meanings respectively
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ascribed to them in this section, except where the context
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otherwise requires:
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(66) COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLE.--Any self-propelled or towed
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vehicle used on the public highways in commerce to transport
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passengers or cargo, if such vehicle:
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(a) Has a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pounds or
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more;
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(b) Is designed to transport more than 15 passengers,
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including the driver; or
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(c) Is used in the transportation of materials found to be
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hazardous for the purposes of the Hazardous Materials
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Transportation Act, as amended (49 U.S.C. ss. 1801 et seq.).
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A vehicle that occasionally transports personal property to and
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from a closed-course motorsport facility, as defined in s.
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549.09(1)(a), is not a commercial motor vehicle if it is not used
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for profit and corporate sponsorship is not involved. As used in
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this subsection, the term "corporate sponsorship" means a
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payment, donation, gratuity, in-kind service, or other benefit
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provided to or derived by a person in relation to the underlying
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activity, other than the display of product or corporate names,
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logos, or other graphic information on the property being
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transported.
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Section 2. Subsection (26) of section 320.01, Florida
45
Statutes, is amended to read:
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320.01 Definitions, general.--As used in the Florida
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Statutes, except as otherwise provided, the term:
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(26) "Commercial motor vehicle" means any vehicle which is
49
not owned or operated by a governmental entity, which uses
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special fuel or motor fuel on the public highways, and which has
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a gross vehicle weight of 26,001 pounds or more, or has three or
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more axles regardless of weight, or is used in combination when
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the weight of such combination exceeds 26,001 pounds gross
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vehicle weight. A vehicle that occasionally transports personal
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property to and from a closed-course motorsport facility, as
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defined in s. 549.09(1)(a), is not a commercial motor vehicle if
57
the use is not for profit and corporate sponsorship is not
58
involved. As used in this subsection, the term "corporate
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sponsorship" means a payment, donation, gratuity, in-kind
60
service, or other benefit provided to or derived by a person in
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relation to the underlying activity, other than the display of
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product or corporate names, logos, or other graphic information
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on the property being transported.
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Section 3. Subsection (8) of section 322.01, Florida
65
Statutes, is amended to read:
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322.01 Definitions.--As used in this chapter:
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(8) "Commercial motor vehicle" means any motor vehicle or
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motor vehicle combination used on the streets or highways, which:
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(a) Has a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or
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more;
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(b) Is designed to transport more than 15 persons,
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including the driver; or
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(c) Is transporting hazardous materials and is required to
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be placarded in accordance with Title 49 C.F.R. part 172, subpart
75
F.
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A vehicle that occasionally transports personal property to and
78
from a closed-course motorsport facility, as defined in s.
79
549.09(1)(a), is not a commercial motor vehicle if the use is not
80
for profit and corporate sponsorship is not involved. As used in
81
this subsection, the term "corporate sponsorship" means a
82
payment, donation, gratuity, in-kind service, or other benefit
83
provided to or derived by a person in relation to the underlying
84
activity, other than the display of product or corporate names,
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logos, or other graphic information on the property being
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transported.
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Section 4. This act shall take effect July 1, 2008.
 

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http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/administration/fmcsr/390.3.htm
Another handy one to throw in the glove box.

BTW, not for hire doesn't mean you aren't commercial. It could actually get you pulled since it looks like you are trying to get around the law.

A Walmart owned semi, for example, is "not for hire" since it is a company truck and is not hired out for other peoples loads, but it is still commercial since it's used in commerce.
 

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It seems that this topic comes up all the time. We go to Florida 4 or 5 times a year, we are 66.5 feet long. We called Florida D.O.T. and asked them exactly what we were required to have and they said that the only thing we needed was the overlength permit. 20 bucks good for 1 year.Nothing else was required as long as we were a registered RV. They didnt care one bit about a race car inside the trailer. We have been all over, we have even be right beside Florida D.O.T and they never once have given us a second glance.
We even went through all the trouble of taking the lettering off of our trailer just to find out that as soon as we got to Bradenton about 500 trailers all lettered up, and no one had any problems from wherever they traveled from. Now what the Florida D.O.T. did tell us they were watching the big Toter Homes with the stacker trailers only because they had tons of complaints about speeding and cutting people off, basicly driving like fools.
I dont know I guess maybe its better to be safe than sorry.:confused::confused:
Florida DMV states a combined length not to exceed 65' in length for recreation vehicles. The over-length permit of $20 annually is correct also. I am at 67' with my 3500 GMC Dually and 50' Goose-neck trailer and have never had a problem...I travel all over the state and see DOT a bunch...FWIW.

Rick
 

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This is coming from NC getting so damn money hungry, plumbers pulling backhoes, landscape guys with big trailers have all been hit so it was a matter of time with all the tracks here so close that they got on our case, I called DMV and have yet to get an answer I'll accept, I have been lucky I drove a big race rig for several years , been stopped and went through weigh stations all with NO CDL, but I know I have got to get legal now, read through some of this if you guys want
http://www.promodzone.com/showthread.php?t=14025
 

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Not for hire doesnt work.. you will still get pulled over.
Any trailer over 10,000 lbs, you need a CDL/NonCDL class A depending on its useage.
I will say all Cops have been going after car haulers/ race car trailers.
 

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The main thing you guys need to know is if your total GVWR between your truck and trailer is 10,001 pounds or more, you cross any state line(interstate commerce), and you made money you are subject to the Federal Motor Carrier Rules and Regulations. It doesn't matter if you pay taxes as a hobby or not. If you made 50 dollars because you got knocked out in the second round, even thou it cost you $1,000 dollars that weekend for fuel, hotel, entry fees, etc.. you still were compensated. So your question is how do I/they FMCSA know that you were compensated? Well unless I was at that race and see you recieve that check or YOU TELL ME that is the only way! As far as the RV goes you are exempt from CDL as long as you were not being compensated. As far as the fine for getting caught without the proper license it is $50.00 civil/federal fine and the officer may write you a regular court ticket. As far as the overlength laws go I haven't heard of many officers enforcing it. If you have any other questions I will be glad to help you. If your trailer is over 10,001 lbs and your total gvwr is over 26,001 lbs you must have a regular class A if you are in COMMERCE you must have a CDL class A. IF you trailer is less than 10,001 lbs but you total gvwr is over 26,001 lbs you must have a regular class B or CDL class B
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The guy who posted this was specifically talking about guys coming from Farmington getting busted. They busted my friend Steve Workman about 10 yrs ago coming out of Mooresville for no CDL and interstate commerce. That all got thrown out because he was doing racing as a hobby. The DOT dudes in NC have always been weird about this I think. The SC DOT man told a bunch of us at a meeting we had with him about this that they read the rules differently than most states. Now it seems they are on a Motorhome kick. RM
 

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The guy who posted this was specifically talking about guys coming from Farmington getting busted. They busted my friend Steve Workman about 10 yrs ago coming out of Mooresville for no CDL and interstate commerce. That all got thrown out because he was doing racing as a hobby. The DOT dudes in NC have always been weird about this I think. The SC DOT man told a bunch of us at a meeting we had with him about this that they read the rules differently than most states. Now it seems they are on a Motorhome kick. RM
10 years ago the NC DMV handled the FMCSA stuff, as of 5 years ago the Highway Patrol took over the DMV because it was all screwed up. To be safe never make money at the races.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The main thing you guys need to know is if your total GVWR between your truck and trailer is 10,001 pounds or more, you cross any state line(interstate commerce), and you made money you are subject to the Federal Motor Carrier Rules and Regulations. It doesn't matter if you pay taxes as a hobby or not.

How sure are you that is so? I ask because the SC DMV guy told me as long as it is a hobby and is a not for profit operation that is not so. These laws are why lawyers got alot of money......LOL. RM
 

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All i know is I got pulled over by a couple troopers last year for not stopping at a weigh station around Asheville NC and those guys werent phucking around. I thought for sure they were going to make me leave the trailer on the side of the road until I could get someone with a CDL to come get it.

Their big stink was the trailer axles were marked 5200lbs each on the sticker so they insisted the trailer was 10,400GVW and I needed a CDL. Even though the sticker was marked plain as day 9800GVW right next to that. Then they said my pass plates on the pickup (TN) were only good for 7000lbs, thats less then the friggin truck itself weighs (2500HD crew cab 4wd diesel). Thank God I didnt have any stickers at all on the car because they would have did the whole commercial thing on me too. Finally a supervisor or something showed up and he told the troopers to leave me alone and I was OK.

You just never know, all I have is a 26' trailer and a pickup truck, i've tried to find out for sure if I had to stop at weigh stations in NC and most say no unless its commercial even though the signs say ALL truck and RVs must weight. Same with the license plate deal, according to TN DOT pass car plates have no weight limit. If its commercial then you need tags for your combined GVW. Stuff will give you a headache lol..
 

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The main thing you guys need to know is if your total GVWR between your truck and trailer is 10,001 pounds or more, you cross any state line(interstate commerce), and you made money you are subject to the Federal Motor Carrier Rules and Regulations. It doesn't matter if you pay taxes as a hobby or not.

How sure are you that is so? I ask because the SC DMV guy told me as long as it is a hobby and is a not for profit operation that is not so. These laws are why lawyers got alot of money......LOL. RM[/quote

I just went thru a 4 week school on all this. I tried to say the same thing about a hobby but they shot me down on it. I dont make any money at the races I just get a trophy or I always lose.;)
 

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All i know is I got pulled over by a couple troopers last year for not stopping at a weigh station around Asheville NC and those guys werent phucking around. I thought for sure they were going to make me leave the trailer on the side of the road until I could get someone with a CDL to come get it.

Their big stink was the trailer axles were marked 5200lbs each on the sticker so they insisted the trailer was 10,400GVW and I needed a CDL. Even though the sticker was marked plain as day 9800GVW right next to that. Then they said my pass plates on the pickup (TN) were only good for 7000lbs, thats less then the friggin truck itself weighs (2500HD crew cab 4wd diesel). Thank God I didnt have any stickers at all on the car because they would have did the whole commercial thing on me too. Finally a supervisor or something showed up and he told the troopers to leave me alone and I was OK.

You just never know, all I have is a 26' trailer and a pickup truck, i've tried to find out for sure if I had to stop at weigh stations in NC and most say no unless its commercial even though the signs say ALL truck and RVs must weight. Same with the license plate deal, according to TN DOT pass car plates have no weight limit. If its commercial then you need tags for your combined GVW. Stuff will give you a headache lol..
The easiest thing to do is just roll on thru the weigh station and get weighed. If you go thru the weigh station on 1-85/1-40 in Burlington it has Weight In Motion scales so it actualy weighs you on in the right side lane of the interstate. Then just stay in the right lane and it will proably send you thru when it senses you are not over weight. As far as your GVWR issue we are suppose to go by the plate on the tounge. I am guessing you truck GVWR is 8,000 or so. You wouldnt have been over 26,001 lbs combined with your truck and trailer so that was BS anyways. Sometimes they forget we are out there to get the unsafe trucks off the road, not to phuck with the little stuff.
 

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Federal and NC law

The law states any combination over 26000 GVRW (not what you are hauling but the manufactures GVWR) requires a CDL or class A lic. Now if a trailer is over 10000 it does not matter as long as the combination is under 26000 total.
My truck 19997 F350 is 10000 GVRW and my trialer is 15000 GVRW so the combination is 25000 (No CDL or Class A Required I do have a class A by the way)
Now just over 26000 does not make you have a CDL but in NC (and most states) if you run for money (purse) you are considered Commerical so you require a CDL.
The problem is a brand new F350, 3500 GMC/Chevy, or Dodge are all over 11500 so any 3 axle trailer (5000 lb axles) means you need at least a Class A lic. and if you run for money (we all do) by law you require a CDL.
I have a good friend that is a NC DOT training officer and he has come by and checked my rig and other friends and even offered to teach a course if you would like to know any more information.

By the way in NC you also need a trailer inspection for any trailer with a GVRW over 3000.

I can show you these are forced federal laws (all states had to accept the same laws) to get federal hyw. funding.
So in almost every state these are the laws so CDL's can transfer from one state to another without breaking the minimum law (some states allow more weight but not less)

There are also laws about travel form state to state that force CDL's (so you may be legal in your home state but you will be required to get a CDL if you cross state lines) and length laws in every state. The normal standard is > 65 ft you are in trouble without permits (and a CDL)
 
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