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Discussion Starter #1
Are you guys running them? Is there a rule of thumb when they are advisable? No brainer to use\not use them. Thanks for checkin in.
 

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I have used them in small tires on a heavier car. Beyond that if a stiff sidewall slick isn't enough then the tubes can help. It also is a help if you ever get something in the tire. You can fix a tube or just replace it and keep going.
 

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Went tubeless 20 years ago and never looked back. I use a stiff side wall tire in SG. A puncture on the tread can be patched from the inside or just plugged, either works fine.
 

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A heavy, higher horsepower car on a small tire needs them. A light, lower horsepower car will be faster without. All application specific. They will also help the sidewall last longer.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
A heavy, higher horsepower car on a small tire needs them. A light, lower horsepower car will be faster without. All application specific. They will also help the sidewall last longer.
Looks like I'll go without. Thanks you guys
 

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Tubes don't go flat after a few days of sitting, slicks do. Tubes will extend the life of a 28x10.5, stiff's also. The sidewalls will thank you. Tubes are more stable on shut down. Tubes will not cause you to loose ET, tubes can gain a minimal ET, due to tire stability.

If you think the weight of the tubes will slow you down, buy lighter wheels, then compare the difference.
 

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Tubes don't go flat after a few days of sitting, slicks do. Tubes will extend the life of a 28x10.5, stiff's also. The sidewalls will thank you. Tubes are more stable on shut down. Tubes will not cause you to loose ET, tubes can gain a minimal ET, due to tire stability.

If you think the weight of the tubes will slow you down, buy lighter wheels, then compare the difference.
Very well said IMO!!
 

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When choosing tubes, be sure to use the "natural rubber" tubes that are designed to be used with slicks. They are expensive, but well worth the $$$$.
 

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For me tubes are what you use after you've gotten a hole in a slick that still has a lot of life left. As for holding air I parked my car at the end of Oct. and the slicks have plenty of air and no tubes. My wheels also have no screws or holes. I keep a plug kit and have plugged a slick and never had to put a tube in it.
 

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For me tubes are what you use after you've gotten a hole in a slick that still has a lot of life left. As for holding air I parked my car at the end of Oct. and the slicks have plenty of air and no tubes. My wheels also have no screws or holes. I keep a plug kit and have plugged a slick and never had to put a tube in it.
Same here! No tubes for me, been 1.26 in the 60ft hitting it hard with juice, no rim screws, car is 3400lbs, no problems. Oh, and I run 18psi of air pressure in my bias ply slicks!
 

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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Many knowledgeable and successful drag racers DO use tubes with bias ply slicks . . . . . . . .
 

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My car would wad up M/T 10.5wx31. I tried as high as 14 psi. It still looked like they were being run over 20-30 ft past the starting line. Regardless of shock adjustment. Car was inconsistent. Added tubes car is much more consistent. Tread surface looks better not all rippled. Sidewalls look better. 3350lbs, high 12X 60ft on the foot brake, best 1.250
Doug
 
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