Yellow Bullet Forums banner

21 - 34 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,483 Posts
I never tried a fried turkey until this past Thanksgiving, it was hands down the best turkey I've ever eaten. I told my wife I'll never oven roast another turkey ever.
That's most people's reaction. Lots of "OMG!!!" LOL. I've done a bunch of them over the years and have pretty well perfected them I think.

Make sure you at least brine it for about 1 hour per pound. I make up a salt and brown sugar concentrate (1.5 cups sea salt or kosher, 2 cups brown sugar, 1 gallon water). Bring it close to a boil. Make sure it dissolves clear. Dump it in a bucket about 1/2 full of ice (5 gallon bucket). Let it melt. When the temp is low enough (cool or cold) drop in your thawed turkey and fill the bucket just enough to submerge the turkey. Put it in the fridge for about 15 hours (for 15 pounder). Before it goes in the fryer make sure you dry it off good. Don't brine too long. Stick to the 1 hour per pound.

They're easy to cook and cook fast. 3 min per pound @ 350 oil temp. Make sure your oil thermometer is accurate and leave it in the oil the entire time you're cooking. If you maintain 325-350 (the oil will cool slightly when you drop the turkey) it'll take almost exactly 3 min per pound.

Another good tip is don't keep the wings and legs close to the body. When you get a Butterball the legs are flipped under a piece of skin that keeps them tight to the body. Need to pull them out and let them hang kind of free.

Use peanut oil. Usually 3-4 gallons in the standard size frying pot, for a 15 pounder. After cooking, if you don't overheat the oil, you can use it again. Just strain it back into the container. Make sure you get all the chunks out of it.

2 biggest mistakes people make are dropping in a wet or not fully thawed turkey, or too much oil in the pot. Either will cause lots of excitement LOL. Lower it into the oil SLOWLY.

Always fry away from the house and with a fire extinguisher and some old heavy towels on hand. Small grease flare ups can be smothered with a heavy towel or two. Last resort you can hit it with the extinguisher. I'm a bit of a pyro but a freak about fire safety at the same time. I always make sure I'm in jeans with a heavy long sleeve shirt and I use welding gloves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,212 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
I use a auto paint strainers 190 microns if you want to strain the oil after it has cooled.
Change to a new one as they become clogged.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,144 Posts
That's most people's reaction. Lots of "OMG!!!" LOL. I've done a bunch of them over the years and have pretty well perfected them I think.

Make sure you at least brine it for about 1 hour per pound. I make up a salt and brown sugar concentrate (1.5 cups sea salt or kosher, 2 cups brown sugar, 1 gallon water). Bring it close to a boil. Make sure it dissolves clear. Dump it in a bucket about 1/2 full of ice (5 gallon bucket). Let it melt. When the temp is low enough (cool or cold) drop in your thawed turkey and fill the bucket just enough to submerge the turkey. Put it in the fridge for about 15 hours (for 15 pounder). Before it goes in the fryer make sure you dry it off good. Don't brine too long. Stick to the 1 hour per pound.

They're easy to cook and cook fast. 3 min per pound @ 350 oil temp. Make sure your oil thermometer is accurate and leave it in the oil the entire time you're cooking. If you maintain 325-350 (the oil will cool slightly when you drop the turkey) it'll take almost exactly 3 min per pound.

Another good tip is don't keep the wings and legs close to the body. When you get a Butterball the legs are flipped under a piece of skin that keeps them tight to the body. Need to pull them out and let them hang kind of free.

Use peanut oil. Usually 3-4 gallons in the standard size frying pot, for a 15 pounder. After cooking, if you don't overheat the oil, you can use it again. Just strain it back into the container. Make sure you get all the chunks out of it.

2 biggest mistakes people make are dropping in a wet or not fully thawed turkey, or too much oil in the pot. Either will cause lots of excitement LOL. Lower it into the oil SLOWLY.

Always fry away from the house and with a fire extinguisher and some old heavy towels on hand. Small grease flare ups can be smothered with a heavy towel or two. Last resort you can hit it with the extinguisher. I'm a bit of a pyro but a freak about fire safety at the same time. I always make sure I'm in jeans with a heavy long sleeve shirt and I use welding gloves.
Ain't no thinking to it.....you've perfected it....nice advice all the way through.
 

·
Former RJ instigator
Joined
·
38,106 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
Ain't no thinking to it.....you've perfected it....nice advice all the way through.
Yes it was, my niece's husband used to work @ Bass pro and he was their turkey fryer demo guy, he pretty much echo'd everything he told me at our family's get together.

I ordered a 15 quart frying pot w/accessories last night, I already have the burner & stand, I can't wait to try one for myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,483 Posts
Are you talking about the Tony's injection? I've used it a couple times, and it's quite good.
I've never used the Tony Chachere's injection but I make something myself that's very similar but a lot lower in salt. The Creole seasoning is a little too salty for me. I need to cut it with other spices to drop the salt content. You definitely don't want to brine and then follow it with a salty injection.
 

·
Sizeable Member
Joined
·
7,712 Posts
Thank you sir! I love to cook. I'd do it for a living but then I wouldn't love it LOL
Same here. Nice job on the bird. I'm partial to smoke roasting mine but I would never turn down a properly prepped and fried turkey.
As an aside, see how the handles stick up on your roasting pan? I'm making it a tradition of burning myself on those annually as I'm trying to get my turkey out of the pan. I go in from both sides with a couple of big forks to lift it out and invariably sear my arm(s) on those damned things. Done it the last 3 years in a row, lol. I have a nice 4 inch burn on my arm right now. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,483 Posts
Same here. Nice job on the bird. I'm partial to smoke roasting mine but I would never turn down a properly prepped and fried turkey.
As an aside, see how the handles stick up on your roasting pan? I'm making it a tradition of burning myself on those annually as I'm trying to get my turkey out of the pan. I go in from both sides with a couple of big forks to lift it out and invariably sear my arm(s) on those damned things. Done it the last 3 years in a row, lol. I have a nice 4 inch burn on my arm right now. :)
If nothing else you're consistent LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,009 Posts
These cookers make an excellent turkey also and you don't have to mess with oil.
https://www.charbroil.com/the-big-easy-oil-less-fryer


The BEST Turkey we've ever had was done with the Big Easy!!! The next year I tried to brine and the bucket wouldn't fit in the fridge,,so ,I just kept adding ice ,,the bird wasn't thawed completely,,, The outside of it was picture perfect,, magazine quality!!! Inside bloody and cold,,wife said NEVER again!!
 
21 - 34 of 34 Posts
Top