Yellow Bullet Forums banner

1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Needs to take his Phucking sunglasses off!!!

I can't believe how much air time BJ gets. Pretty boring if you ask me.

Not to mention, who pays more than a $1,000,000 for a 1970 LS6 Chevelle Convertible???
 

·
Aviation Section
Joined
·
25,487 Posts
I always laugh at how there's more 'real numbers matching' 70 LS6 cars now than there was in 1970. They seem to pop up everywhere.
Same thing with 69' Z-28's, people that went to Woodstock and people that fought in Vietnam! Dave

You'll see Steve yank the mike out of the auctioneers hand and make a comment like HE is the sole authority on the subject and the fact that he mentioned somthing about the car in question should keep the bidding going up. Dave
 

·
SEENYOR MEMBER
Joined
·
7,828 Posts
He has sensitivity to light, he probably suffers from migraines.

I also hate when they stop the bidding to tell you something about the car and basically BEG for money on the car...WTF?
 

·
Never hit Newbie Thread
Joined
·
10,393 Posts
The owner buying it back because he was going to lose his ass on it.

A lot of the big money "sales" are shills just to look good on TV.:rolleyes:


You have no idea how right you are.... I love it when you see the price just going up and up, but yet there is nobody really bidding on it..





Vanilla
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,700 Posts
You guys must run in different crowds. I've got friends both buying and selling at Barrett-Jackson. The cars seem pretty real when they bring them home.
 

·
Never hit Newbie Thread
Joined
·
10,393 Posts
Some of the cars actually do get sold... Im sure the majority of them are... But others are usually sold back to the owners. All they have to do is pay the sellers and buyers fee...


If your car went across the block for 1/3 of what you thought you were going to get, would you buy it back or just let it go???






Vanilla
 

·
The Media has an agenda!
Joined
·
25,768 Posts
Some of the cars actually do get sold... Im sure the majority of them are... But others are usually sold back to the owners. All they have to do is pay the sellers and buyers fee...


If your car went across the block for 1/3 of what you thought you were going to get, would you buy it back or just let it go???




Vanilla
gulp....that's like 18%....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,487 Posts
Probably has sensitivity to light BECAUSE he wears them all the damn time. The whole works (except Amy!) seem like a bunch of sheisters, they should all be wearing dark sunglasses and using aliases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,459 Posts
Davis is an annoying P.O.S. Painful to constantly watch him 'Push' the Mustangs that need help on stage. Ya' Ya' so you like Mustangs, nothing wrong with that...now 'Shut the F**k up already!' Sunglasses are probably so he can't see his small dick when he gets out of the shower. :-Shower
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,700 Posts
From Barrett-Jackson's website:
Barrett-Jackson said:
Jackson and Davis say they recognize there is some confusion about the difference between the rules at reserve and no-reserve auctions, and they know this confusion sometimes spills over to their own events. The laws that govern sales at auction set very specific guidelines, though, and all auction companies are required to abide by them. The National Auctioneers Association (NAA) tries to break down the different terms in a way that can be easily understood.
For example, the NAA defines “auction with reserve” as follows: “An auction in which the seller or his agent reserves the right to accept or decline any and all bids. A minimum acceptable price may or may not be disclosed and the seller reserves the right to accept or decline any bid within a specified time.” In a sale with a reserve, the auctioneer may advance the bid on the owner’s behalf up to the reserve price.
On the other hand, an “auction without reserve” is defined as: “An auction where the property is sold to the highest qualified bidder with no limiting conditions or amount. The seller may not bid personally or through an agent.” In a no-reserve auction, the auctioneer may not knowingly accept a bid from an owner or an owner’s agent, and all bids placed are real bids from real, interested buyers.
Barrett-Jackson not only bans unauthorized practices (such as owners bidding on their own cars) in its consignment agreement with sellers, but uses casino-style, state-of-the-art technology to catch those who refuse to abide by the laws.
“We have systems in place,” says Jackson, explaining that real-time television monitors show auction personnel images of a vehicle’s owner, the active bidders and their auction buying and selling histories.
“If we find the owner or a known agent of the owner bidding, we stop the auction and go back to the last real bidder,” Jackson says.
 

·
Never hit Newbie Thread
Joined
·
10,393 Posts
Its been done... A lot more than one would think...


If you have a car that you believe is worth $100,000 and it is only bringing $50,000, would you rather sell it for $50,000 or pay the $9,000 and hope to find a buyer who will pay closer to what you are asking???




Vanilla
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top