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SHERIFF
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Optional from 1971-1973 was the performance oriented 4-barrel carburetor equipped 351 cubic-inch V8. For 1971
it was rated at 285 gross horsepower, for 1972 it was rated at 262 horsepower and 266 horsepower with the Cobra-Jet package, and for 1973 it only was available Cobra-Jet package and rated at 264 horsepower. Ford may have moved the Cougar upscale but for 1971 it gave it one of its best performance engines of this era the 429 cubic-inch big-block Cobra-Jet V8 which was rated a 370 gross horsepower. The 429 Cobra-jet could be equipped with an optional ram air induction system which fed fresh air into this engines carburetor from a hood scoop. Unfortunately the 429 Cobra-Jet was only available in the Cougar for 1971. A 3-speed automatic transmission was available with all 1971-1973 Cougar engines. A 3-speed manual was available with the 2-barrel 351 V8 for 1971-1972. And a 4-speed manual was available with the 429 Cobra-Jet V8 for 1971 and with the 4-barrel 351 V8 from 1971-1973.Performance for a 351 Cobra-Jet 351 4V was in the sub 16 to high 15 second zone.

Ford and Mercury performance car fans usually prefer the first generation Cougar due to its more sports car like styling and wide assortment of different performance engines. However the second generation Cougar had its advantages. Ford didnt realize it at the time but the 1971-1973 Cougar was a transitional car, it was the bridge between the performance oriented first generation Cougar and the different iterations that would follow of slower accelerating luxury oriented 2-door Cougars which were partial responsible for making popular the 2-door personal luxury car segment in the 1970s. The 1971-1973 Mercury Cougar since it had very good acceleration and luxury, it was the best of both worlds. The word has finally gotten out and 1971-1973 Cougar prices have been climbing in recent years due to its increasing popularity.

Ya a real killer...:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
 

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Other than a few early Cougars the 72 and up were slow ..face it,If they were so fast they would of been more sold and talked about.
Everything 72 and up were slow. However because of emissions alot were just timing settings and added smog pumps. In the case of camaro especially. The engine not much difference. The 351 4v engine that came in 74 was pretty much identical to the oc motors before it. Ford had the ignition timing set back so far it was pathetic. 15 minutes would fix that. Thats why all your google tests are meaningless. Hell any dealer that was supplying cars couldve changed outcome easily. On the street it was different. Those who spent the extra time had as much power on tap as earlier cars.
 

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Everything 72 and up were slow. However because of emissions alot were just timing settings and added smog pumps. In the case of camaro especially. The engine not much difference. The 351 4v engine that came in 74 was pretty much identical to the oc motors before it. Ford had the ignition timing set back so far it was pathetic. 15 minutes would fix that. Thats why all your google tests are meaningless. Hell any dealer that was supplying cars couldve changed outcome easily. On the street it was different. Those who spent the extra time had as much power on tap as earlier cars.
Did you read up when HP ratings changed yet?
You act like you have the answer to everything, yet get caught being wrong on so much 不
 

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Discussion Starter · #65,712 ·
The team developing the Ford GT40 had a problem: Their NASCAR-sourced 427 V8 needed a special carburetor in order to reliably make full power for the full 24-hour race at Le Mansand have any chance of beating Ferrari.

Since an off-the-shelf carb wouldn't suffice, Holley engineer Harold Droste was tasked with finding a solution. He came back with this, a prototype 780-CFM four-barrel carburetor.
Keep it coming Pea1. Another Holley 4150 style carb that Ford and Holley collaborated on. Good stuff! A special road race Holley courtesy of the Ford Motor Company.
 

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Optional from 1971-1973 was the performance oriented 4-barrel carburetor equipped 351 cubic-inch V8. For 1971
it was rated at 285 gross horsepower, for 1972 it was rated at 262 horsepower and 266 horsepower with the Cobra-Jet package, and for 1973 it only was available Cobra-Jet package and rated at 264 horsepower. Ford may have moved the Cougar upscale but for 1971 it gave it one of its best performance engines of this era the 429 cubic-inch big-block Cobra-Jet V8 which was rated a 370 gross horsepower. The 429 Cobra-jet could be equipped with an optional ram air induction system which fed fresh air into this engines carburetor from a hood scoop. Unfortunately the 429 Cobra-Jet was only available in the Cougar for 1971. A 3-speed automatic transmission was available with all 1971-1973 Cougar engines. A 3-speed manual was available with the 2-barrel 351 V8 for 1971-1972. And a 4-speed manual was available with the 429 Cobra-Jet V8 for 1971 and with the 4-barrel 351 V8 from 1971-1973.Performance for a 351 Cobra-Jet 351 4V was in the sub 16 to high 15 second zone.

Ford and Mercury performance car fans usually prefer the first generation Cougar due to its more sports car like styling and wide assortment of different performance engines. However the second generation Cougar had its advantages. Ford didnt realize it at the time but the 1971-1973 Cougar was a transitional car, it was the bridge between the performance oriented first generation Cougar and the different iterations that would follow of slower accelerating luxury oriented 2-door Cougars which were partial responsible for making popular the 2-door personal luxury car segment in the 1970s. The 1971-1973 Mercury Cougar since it had very good acceleration and luxury, it was the best of both worlds. The word has finally gotten out and 1971-1973 Cougar prices have been climbing in recent years due to its increasing popularity.

Ya a real killer...:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
Hey numbnut. The 285 motor is exactly the same as the 300+ motor it replaced. Absolutely no difference. Just the way it was rated. Fact
 

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lost 2 or so points of compression...That hurts a bit
lost 2 or so points of compression...That hurts a bit
The cobra jet never did. The 74 4v was the same and the only 4v you could get.
Q-code (Cobra-Jet)

The Q-code "351 Cobra Jet" version was produced from May 1971 through the 1974 model year. It was a low-compression design that included open-chamber "4V" heads, a special intake manifold, special hi-lift long duration hydraulic camshaft, special valve springs and dampers, a 750 CFM 4300-D Motorcraft Carburetor, dual-point distributor, and 4-bolt main bearing caps. It was rated at 266 hp (198 kW) (SAE net) for 1972 when installed in the Mustang and 248 hp in the Ford Torino and Mercury Montego. The horsepower rating dropped in 1973 to 246 hp for the 4-barrel for the intermediate Fords, and still retained the higher 266 hp rating in the Mustang. The 351 CJ (now referred to simply as the "351 4V") was rated at 255 hp in 1974 and was only installed in the Ford Torino, Mercury Montego and the Mercury Cougar.
 

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Fuck me if a 455 cant beat a 302 smog engine may as well pack it in. You retards forgot the jist of my comment tho which is normal for nut hugging bowtie ball suckers. The point was it was fords return to nimble light cars that progressed into the second hp pony wars with the 5 litres. Which the m2 started. In the mist of the energy crisis.
Buh...buh...buh...bullshit.
 
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