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Looks like I need to reseal my intake on my car. I used Hondabond when I assembled it and it appears I let it set up too long before setting the intake in place. It adhered great to the block side of the china wall but not on the manifold side. It was really hot in my shop that day so I probably should have set the manifold right away from what I've read in this thread. Any other suggestions to ensure a leak free seal at the china wall?
 

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Just trim the top off the silicone with a sharp razor. Add some new fresh silicone right onto the existing silicone. It will bond right up.
 

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Re: The Silicone Thread!!

Don't do that. Seriously. That's standard clear silicone that you use to seal windows and things in your HOME. NOT engines.
I do the same as Ben, I buy the lowest cost 100% silicone available in caulking tubes at Walmart. Works in NASCAR, works in drag racing, worked in place of an oil pan gasket when I needed to snug up pickup to pan clearance slightly. I'd rather spend my time and cash on things that actually make a difference
 

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Most of NASCAR racing engines use Valco Silicone. Hendricks,RCR,Nemechek, and many others use Valco for a fact. And in Drag racing many of the biggest names use Valco Silicone also. All-in-one and Extreme formulas are the two most used. Clear,aluminum, black are the colors All-in-one comes in and Extreme only comes in light grey cartridge now.
 

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Another fact, if it seals and lasts between builds, it doesn't make a difference to me.

Just sharing my experience, not someone else's.
 

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I have been using CAF4 allot lately. I like it and the Loctite Grey these days, really getting it done for me, ZERO comeback. I like CAF4 for machine surface sealing, just rub on with a finger.
 

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I see in previous pages that soaking in acetone works well for removing silicone. But of course I don't have a vat that I can soak an intake in. Nor do I want to soak a powder coated intake in acetone overnight. Anything that is practical for home shop use that helps remove silicone? I sometimes resort to mineral spirits and a scotchbright pad. But man I hate using scotchbright due to how thorough you have to be getting any of THAT residue out of the part before use.
 

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There is never a reason to 100% remove Silicone. Chances are your going to be replacing the Silicone when the engine is reassembled. All you have to remove is any loose or chunks of silicone and lay the new Silicone right back down. Silicone sticks to Silicone better than it does metal.
 

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There is never a reason to 100% remove Silicone. Chances are your going to be replacing the Silicone when the engine is reassembled. All you have to remove is any loose or chunks of silicone and lay the new Silicone right back down. Silicone sticks to Silicone better than it does metal.

That just seems too easy! Is there a harder way? LOL.
Guess I will just have to do it the easy way and save time then. Thanks!
 

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I just ride the surfaces w a single edge razor blade, give it a wipe w some solvent and call it good.... Seals up great
 

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If I'm working on someone elses stuff and find that yellow gurrilla snot stuff. I typically just chain the part up to the back of the truck and run it down the hwy. Seriously that shit sucks.
 

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Does anyone know what silicon has a metallic silver appearance ?
710xx195 3oz Aluminum Silicone has 5% powder Aluminum for appearance, heat transfer and stability. Also available in 11.17 ounce cartridge. 710xx202 IIRC.
 

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You can buy a Silcone 'eater' in a caulk tube over here, smear a bit on the hardened silicone and it turns it to jelly after about 20 mins. It's used in the construction industry, mainly for PVC window fitters,may be available over there.
 

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Interesting. Here in the States, most of our silicone removal products use dichloromethane (methylene chloride) as the active ingredient, and some concoction of polyethylene glycol(s) to hold the dichloromethane in place and keep it from evaporating before it can do its job. I'll have to keep my eye out for a sulphonic acid based remover.
 
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