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I've got a bit of an odd situation. I have a 1991 GMC Syclone, which is essentially an all wheel Chevy S10. It has a 408ci twin turbo LS based motor backed by a 4L80e transmission (no trans brake) and a hybrid viscous coupling BorgWarner transfer case.

When it launches, I need to keep the front end from lifting, as well as keeping the back end from squatting. If it unloades either the front or back end, the transfer case goes into "hump" (locks) which kills momentum and makes it very squirrely.

Front suspension is single adjustable coil overs (replacing stock shocks and torsion bars) on stock control arms with original sway bar and homemade travel limiting straps. This helps a lot with controlling front end lift.

A few of the faster guys with these combos have swapped over to 4 link or ladder bar rear suspensions. Is it possible to use a leaf spring rear with something like a Caltrac split mono leaf set-up with their adjustable shocks and replacing the shackles with sliders and a street style sway bar?

It seems most of the S10 racers are trying to transfer hard to the rear, but this combo needs to leave as flat as possible. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Rob
 

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draggin' ass
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Why not use a traditional gear to gear or chain drive transfer case and let the chassis work the way it naturally wants to? Further, yes your caltrac idea will work to do as you want, it will drive the rear down and plant the body even.
 

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Why not use a traditional gear to gear or chain drive transfer case and let the chassis work the way it naturally wants to? Further, yes your caltrac idea will work to do as you want, it will drive the rear down and plant the body even.

A traditional locked transfer case would be undriveable on the street, and the front differential and axles would probably die on the first launch if 50% of the power ever got applied to them. The viscous style transfer case splits torque so only 35% goes to the front and also allows some differential bias between front and rear wheel speeds for turning and such. When the front and back drive shafts move at different speeds beyond the allowed bias, the viscous coupler locks.

Most S10 set-ups try to transfer too hard to the rear and would unload the front tires in my application. I've got the front suspension pretty much dialed in to keep from lifting, and I think that if I replace the rear shackles with sliders, it ought to help keep from squatting at launch and lifting under braking.
 
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