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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there! I'm new to Nitrous and so far I've really enjoyed it, but I have a request that I believe could help many of us. Could someone with extensive nitrous knowledge (i.e. Vendor) give us a tutorial on reading plugs? In many of our quest to maximize our nitrous setups (selfishly mine included), I feel this could be a great help. I have not found in this section, or any other for that matter a stock that is informative on plug reading. Like I said, just a request. A request I think many will benefit from.
 

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Third!!!!

Excellent idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Keep bumping it if you think it's a good idea! Hopefully nitrous solutions or another vendor can give us a tutorial.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You mean like the one on Steve's web site forum? LOL

There's been plenty of threads on plug reading, you just have to look a little harder. Try Google, it works too.

http://inductionsolutions.com/forums/forum/tech-forums/nitrous/542-spark-plug-tutorial
Truthfully, that's ok, but more of a matter of fact this equals this kind of plug reading sticky. What is posted here is a thread with speculations and questions. I believe many of us are looking for a when the plug looks like this (example A) then your running rich, etc, etc, etc.

And yes, I did use google and searched here to find what I was looking for specifically related to nitrous, and didn't find it. No need to get chippy. I had a request that I believe could help many, and if a vendor supplied it, I'd bet it'd lead to more business through that vendor due to their array of knowledge. Just a thought and suggestion.
 

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I will try and digest this as a thought. One of my reserves comes from if you do a search now and find threads where guys have ask about plug input, in many cases it will be followed up by the changes they made as well as the results they then got.

Plug reading is something that many see in different ways. I notice that many seem to think every plug posted is pig fat.. :rolleyes:

One of the other things I can promise you is reading plugs via the internet can be very tough. The focus and lighting are very tough to know when viewing a picture of a plug. As an example a couple of weeks ago a customer sent me a picture of a plug and I replied and ask if it was out of there tow vehicle because it looked so nasty. The guy replied calling me a jerk I think LOL and also sent a new picture with a flash and it looked like a 100% different plug.

My fear of a sticky is to much misguiding info. To many answers without consideration on things like the lighting, conditions, trying to make a call off of one plug and not all 8 and so on. This could hurt a lot more then help in many cases.. Just my two cents.. SJ
 

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Right or wrong, these photos of Plugs from Steve depict Plugs just about how I like to see them...

Originally posted by fast351 View Post
Very good info.. This is the type of info I been looking for.. Is the fuel ring suppose to be dark or light in color? Also who sells a quality spark plug mag/lite?

If your running a new set of plugs, and you tow up and back, after one run you will relly want to just see a light smokey, small ring at the bottom. One thing to remember, the more runs you make on a plug, the more color it will get/show.

There are some that go way over board chasing this snow white plug. You may be able to get this after one run, but as the runs add up, the plug will collect color.

Just some food for thought.... These plugs have 2-3 runs on them. You'll see the porcelains are fairly white, you can see there's a timing mark on the ground straps, and you'll notice the outter ring of the plug has started to collect some carbon as well...





Many would try and tell you these are "pig rich" and it will never run that way, or will hurt parts... :confused:

This engine has about 60-80 runs ALL on 3 stages with this tune and hasn't nipped a plug... Thanks, SJ
 

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Truthfully, that's ok, but more of a matter of fact this equals this kind of plug reading sticky. What is posted here is a thread with speculations and questions. I believe many of us are looking for a when the plug looks like this (example A) then your running rich, etc, etc, etc.

And yes, I did use google and searched here to find what I was looking for specifically related to nitrous, and didn't find it. No need to get chippy. I had a request that I believe could help many, and if a vendor supplied it, I'd bet it'd lead to more business through that vendor due to their array of knowledge. Just a thought and suggestion.
When I searched "how to read nitrous spark plugs" it returned several pages links, videos, etc., a LOT of good information. There is no magic bullet of information if that is what you are trying to find. The principals of reading spark plugs whether it's nitrous or non-nitrous are basically the same. Nitrous is technically N/A as there's no forced induction. AFR, timing, all those things are read whether it's got nitrous or not. Each engine is slightly different and may require different jet spreads in various cylinders or ICT adjustments to get it right. There's no rule that says a snow white plug is going to be the quickest tune either. The plug may look perfect in your eyes but not what your car needs to go the quickest.

There was no being "chippy" as you put it, just directing you to the quickest way to get what you are looking for unless you hire a tuner to show you in person which is not a bad way to go either and will likely save a lot of time & parts. There's no way I can look at those pix that Fofo put up and say that's a good or bad set of plugs without a closer view and also seeing the fuel ring etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I will try and digest this as a thought. One of my reserves comes from if you do a search now and find threads where guys have ask about plug input, in many cases it will be followed up by the changes they made as well as the results they then got.

Plug reading is something that many see in different ways. I notice that many seem to think every plug posted is pig fat.. :rolleyes:

One of the other things I can promise you is reading plugs via the internet can be very tough. The focus and lighting are very tough to know when viewing a picture of a plug. As an example a couple of weeks ago a customer sent me a picture of a plug and I replied and ask if it was out of there tow vehicle because it looked so nasty. The guy replied calling me a jerk I think LOL and also sent a new picture with a flash and it looked like a 100% different plug.

My fear of a sticky is to much misguiding info. To many answers without consideration on things like the lighting, conditions, trying to make a call off of one plug and not all 8 and so on. This could hurt a lot more then help in many cases.. Just my two cents.. SJ
I completely understand where you are coming from. For me, I'm looking at it from this perspective: I am running my plate system on an LS motor, and with most modern engines plugs are rarely used at all to tell what is happening in the combustion chamber. Wide bands are used almost exclusively, and where I do understand that this is a much easier and quicker once installed, I still believe knowing how to read plugs is a valuable skill that some of us nitrous newbies need to learn. That is all I'm am looking for. Pictures documenting different plugs and situations would be great, but even a general when the plug looks like x, this is what it's tell ing you, and this is what needs to be done. Again, any help is much appreciated.

Right or wrong, these photos of Plugs from Steve depict Plugs just about how I like to see them...

Originally posted by fast351 View Post
Very good info.. This is the type of info I been looking for.. Is the fuel ring suppose to be dark or light in color? Also who sells a quality spark plug mag/lite?

If your running a new set of plugs, and you tow up and back, after one run you will relly want to just see a light smokey, small ring at the bottom. One thing to remember, the more runs you make on a plug, the more color it will get/show.

There are some that go way over board chasing this snow white plug. You may be able to get this after one run, but as the runs add up, the plug will collect color.

Just some food for thought.... These plugs have 2-3 runs on them. You'll see the porcelains are fairly white, you can see there's a timing mark on the ground straps, and you'll notice the outter ring of the plug has started to collect some carbon as well...





Many would try and tell you these are "pig rich" and it will never run that way, or will hurt parts... :confused:

This engine has about 60-80 runs ALL on 3 stages with this tune and hasn't nipped a plug... Thanks, SJ
Thanks for posting. This is exactly what I was looking for.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
When I searched "how to read nitrous spark plugs" it returned several pages links, videos, etc., a LOT of good information. There is no magic bullet of information if that is what you are trying to find. The principals of reading spark plugs whether it's nitrous or non-nitrous are basically the same. Nitrous is technically N/A as there's no forced induction. AFR, timing, all those things are read whether it's got nitrous or not. Each engine is slightly different and may require different jet spreads in various cylinders or ICT adjustments to get it right. There's no rule that says a snow white plug is going to be the quickest tune either. The plug may look perfect in your eyes but not what your car needs to go the quickest.

There was no being "chippy" as you put it, just directing you to the quickest way to get what you are looking for unless you hire a tuner to show you in person which is not a bad way to go either and will likely save a lot of time & parts. There's no way I can look at those pix that Fofo put up and say that's a good or bad set of plugs without a closer view and also seeing the fuel ring etc.
Gotcha, and thanks for clarifying. Hiring a tuner may be best. I truthfully, was just thinking a stick here with some sort of tutorial aspect to it concerning reading plugs may go along way to both helping folks out here, and subsequently leading to possible business opportunities from a vendor that'll step up to do it.
 

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Thanks for sharing the plugs Fo Fo. The plugs posted in both #12and#16 are from my shop car. That tune had a ton of three stage passes on it without even a nipped tip or pinched ring.

As far as saying that when tuning a late model car, plugs are rarely used all to tell what's going on inside the combustion chamber, and that wide bands are used exclusively is not always true. That statement is probably dependent on who you work with.

I work with quite a few late model guys and we read plugs. Reading plugs for each application is just another thing I work hand in hand with our customers on as well. The plug is about the only thing that will tell you what's going on IN the chamber. O2's only tell you what's going on in the exhaust where it's mounted.

I've had two customers that come to mind just recently that went to a chassis dyno and there cars read poor A/F numbers. Luckily both called and ask what they should do. I said quit wasting your time and go to the track where you can really tune the car. Both were reading in the 10-1 area best I recall. But went to track and 12-1 and the cars hauled ass.

I know some like the quick piece of mind of hitting the nitrous on the dyno just to make sure all seems fine. I'm ok with that. Just not a big fan of trying to really dial in close on one. Just my two cents. SJ
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for sharing the plugs Fo Fo. The plugs posted in both #12and#16 are from my shop car. That tune had a ton of three stage passes on it without even a nipped tip or pinched ring.

As far as saying that when tuning a late model car, plugs are rarely used all to tell what's going on inside the combustion chamber, and that wide bands are used exclusively is not always true. That statement is probably dependent on who you work with.

I work with quite a few late model guys and we read plugs. Reading plugs for each application is just another thing I work hand in hand with our customers on as well. The plug is about the only thing that will tell you what's going on IN the chamber. O2's only tell you what's going on in the exhaust where it's mounted.

I've had two customers that come to mind just recently that went to a chassis dyno and there cars read poor A/F numbers. Luckily both called and ask what they should do. I said quit wasting your time and go to the track where you can really tune the car. Both were reading in the 10-1 area best I recall. But went to track and 12-1 and the cars hauled ass.

I know some like the quick piece of mind of hitting the nitrous on the dyno just to make sure all seems fine. I'm ok with that. Just not a big fan of trying to really dial in close on one. Just my two cents. SJ
That is exactly why I'd like to become better at it myself.
 
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