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Anybody vaguely explain the differences between the two? Or does anybody have any info or books on the topic?

I can scoop up a old alignment machine for 200 bucks and wouldn't mind playing around with it if I could get some knowledge or direction on the topic. Thanks.
 

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Depending on the car , lots more caster ( 8 - 10 degrees ) , no camber and little toe in .
Hi,
Can you elaborate on this a little please? I have 62 Biscayne running high 9s low 10s at 133mph + with a stock alignment on the car at this point and it kind of scares the shit out of me at the and of the run
 

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A regular street car specs are set up for crowns in the road, taking a turn, ect..... A race car alignment is for one thing, going straight. I set camber at 0, I set caster as much as I can get it as long as its equal both sides (stock suspension you're lucky to get 4-6, Strut or aftermarket A-arms 8-10) Toe is 1/16" in each side (1/8" total) I also do the alignments with the weight of the driver in the car (40lb bags of speedi dry) IMO it is very important to do it with the weight in the car.

Depending on how much caster you have in the car now, if you can increase it 2-3 and make it even you'll see the biggest gain from that. Who knows, it just may be really off the way it sits and getting it back to good could be a huge help.
 

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I like to put a jack under the front to raise it about 1 1/2" to 2" before I make my adjustments to replicate the car's stance running down the track. Don't forget to add weight to the driver's seat or sit in it yourself if someone else is making the adjustments. 8-10 degrees caster, 0 camber, and 1/16" - 1/8" toe in.
 

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Hi,
Can you elaborate on this a little please? I have 62 Biscayne running high 9s low 10s at 133mph + with a stock alignment on the car at this point and it kind of scares the shit out of me at the and of the run

Factory specs for older cars usually call for negative caster. Caster provides stability at high speeds, so the more you can the better the car should handle. Most aftermarket tubular control arms are made to provide extra caster. Hope this helps.
 

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My '66 A body, manual steering, only goes 118 mph but works well as follows. Factory specs are caster -0.5 deg to -2 deg; camber -.25 deg to +.5 deg, toe in .125" to .188". I set camber +.75 or +1 deg, caster -.25 or 0 deg, toe in .125". As caster gets more + it will be harder to steer at low speeds but track better at high speeds. Static + camber (top of tire pointing out) means the camber doesn't get so neg. as the front end lifts. Toe in to ensure it never becomes toe out which would give poor directional stability.
 

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I have my toe set with the front raised 3"
 

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If you set toe in with the front raised, check it again with the front end at rest, like it would be at speed. A lot of cars will have significant toe in change with lift. I found that it was better to restrict the amount of lift with the thickness of the rubber snubber under the upper A arm because toe in went very far per inch of lift above a certain point. Also, you don't want toe out at rest, as I noted above. Lets say you get 1/16" more toe in with each inch of lift up to about 4" of lift, a very possible scenario. Then, you get 1/8" or more per additional inch. If you set toe in at 4" lift you will have 1/8" toe out at rest, and the car may handle very poorly at high speed.
 

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Depending on your setup, many car's front is raised at speed.

I set mine at 0 with the front raised.
 

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I like to put a jack under the front to raise it about 1 1/2" to 2" before I make my adjustments to replicate the car's stance running down the track. Don't forget to add weight to the driver's seat or sit in it yourself if someone else is making the adjustments. 8-10 degrees caster, 0 camber, and 1/16" - 1/8" toe in.
X2
On my coil-over sprung, A-arm front end, tube chassis Beretta .. I raised the front end 1-1/2" max.

Oh yeah .... be sure the front tire pressure is set before aligning.
 

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A regular street car specs are set up for crowns in the road, taking a turn, ect..... A race car alignment is for one thing, going straight. I set camber at 0, I set caster as much as I can get it as long as its equal both sides (stock suspension you're lucky to get 4-6, Strut or aftermarket A-arms 8-10) Toe is 1/16" in each side (1/8" total) I also do the alignments with the weight of the driver in the car (40lb bags of speedi dry) IMO it is very important to do it with the weight in the car.

Depending on how much caster you have in the car now, if you can increase it 2-3 and make it even you'll see the biggest gain from that. Who knows, it just may be really off the way it sits and getting it back to good could be a huge help.
make sure you set alignment at ride hight at finish line attitude .look at pics or vis
jack the body to get it right .
we had to cut and weld the upper a-arms to get ball joint back on the 64-67 big gm's
 

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Hi,
Can you elaborate on this a little please? I have 62 Biscayne running high 9s low 10s at 133mph + with a stock alignment on the car at this point and it kind of scares the shit out of me at the and of the run
Easiest way to understand caster is to picture a bicycle. If the forks were straight up and down under the fork neck there would be zero caster and it would be very touchy and hard to ride with no hands, like a BMX bike. Look at an old fashioned bike and the forks have a curve placing the wheel axle ahead of the fork neck making it track better and easy to ride with no hands.
 
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