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Good question...^^^^^ subscribing...
 

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allows you to lower the car two inches without effecting the up or down travel in the strut. I have been running the Racecraft drop spindles and never had an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
allows you to lower the car two inches without effecting the up or down travel in the strut. I have been running the Racecraft drop spindles and never had an issue.

I understand that. But why are so many people selling them? There has to be something to it.
 

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Perhaps they are going to a spindlemount integrated shock setup for weight reasons?
I also heard some wanted diffrent rim choice...I,m in the market for a set of 2"drop spindles...
 

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I don't really see a need for them on a stock susp car. I raised my car back up. With drops on it you will not have as much upward travel in the strut unless you have the plates below the towers.

Tim
 

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The drop spindles may work better on a very high hp car that does not need much travel to prevent dragging the bumper.. Cars the need the travel, I can see the drop spindles not working as well.
 

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ProStock Jackstand Winner
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huh? the travel doesn't change, that's why you put them on when you want a lower car. you can drop the car 2" and maintain the stock travel.
 

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I was wondering what the pros and cons to using 2" drop spindles on a fox body. It seems there are a lot of them for sale and was wondering why people are not useing them?
The Pro's of the drop spindle:

1. When you lower a car using springs you effectively decrease the upward travel of your strut, so you have 3" of shaft showing on your strut then, you lower your car 2" now you have 1" of shaft showing or 1" of travel upward. This is great for a slower car, because the extra travel out ward will let the car transfer easier, because the weight of the front suspension, brakes, and wheels is not applied to the car until that strut reaches full extension making the front of the car lighter initially, therefore transferring weight to the back of the car easier and more quickly.

The con of this set up is once you start carrying the front wheels and the car comes down you have no upward travel to cushion your decent. The car comes down and bottoms out on the strut. So for every action there is a reaction, the reaction is the back of the car starts to unload and you loose traction.

When you drop your car with a drop spindle you lower your car and have no change in strut travel, therefore you have cushion to let your car transition from wheels up to wheels down with out disrupting the rear of the car.

Again when lowering your car with a coil over kit and springs the lower a-arm moves upward through its travel. So optimum angle for the lower a-arm is parallel to the ground to slightly up hill. So lets say your lower a-arm has a range of motion of 35° up and 35° down and at ride height the a-arm is at 0°. You lower your car with your coil over kit and springs 2", now your a-arm is sitting at 20°.

So in wheels up wheels down you just lost 20° of travel and created another place for the travel of the car to run out of travel and disrupt the motion of the launch. This lack of travel also creates a geometry issue with the steering, which creates bump steer.

You’re a-arm is connected to the steering arm which is swing in an arc with the spindle. As the suspension moves through its range of motion the steering arc changes length. This change in length steers the wheel in as it shortens and out as it lengthens, so to minimize this action you want to keep you’re a-arm in its center of motion.

To sum up the Pro’s you maintain proper strut travel and a-arm angle when lowering a stock suspension car with a drop spindle. Also, the aftermarket spindle is lighter than the stock spindle and is ready to accept aftermarket brakes without modification.

The Cons of the drop spindle:


The con is they cost more money than a stock spindle.
 

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YB Monster Crew
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Thanks for the writeup and explanation sir... Definately going to be getting a set from you...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The Pro's of the drop spindle:

1. When you lower a car using springs you effectively decrease the upward travel of your strut, so you have 3" of shaft showing on your strut then, you lower your car 2" now you have 1" of shaft showing or 1" of travel upward. This is great for a slower car, because the extra travel out ward will let the car transfer easier, because the weight of the front suspension, brakes, and wheels is not applied to the car until that strut reaches full extension making the front of the car lighter initially, therefore transferring weight to the back of the car easier and more quickly.

The con of this set up is once you start carrying the front wheels and the car comes down you have no upward travel to cushion your decent. The car comes down and bottoms out on the strut. So for every action there is a reaction, the reaction is the back of the car starts to unload and you loose traction.

When you drop your car with a drop spindle you lower your car and have no change in strut travel, therefore you have cushion to let your car transition from wheels up to wheels down with out disrupting the rear of the car.

Again when lowering your car with a coil over kit and springs the lower a-arm moves upward through its travel. So optimum angle for the lower a-arm is parallel to the ground to slightly up hill. So lets say your lower a-arm has a range of motion of 35° up and 35° down and at ride height the a-arm is at 0°. You lower your car with your coil over kit and springs 2", now your a-arm is sitting at 20°.

So in wheels up wheels down you just lost 20° of travel and created another place for the travel of the car to run out of travel and disrupt the motion of the launch. This lack of travel also creates a geometry issue with the steering, which creates bump steer.

You’re a-arm is connected to the steering arm which is swing in an arc with the spindle. As the suspension moves through its range of motion the steering arc changes length. This change in length steers the wheel in as it shortens and out as it lengthens, so to minimize this action you want to keep you’re a-arm in its center of motion.

To sum up the Pro’s you maintain proper strut travel and a-arm angle when lowering a stock suspension car with a drop spindle. Also, the aftermarket spindle is lighter than the stock spindle and is ready to accept aftermarket brakes without modification.

The Cons of the drop spindle:


The con is they cost more money than a stock spindle.

Thanks for your reply. That is great info.
 
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