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but really what your asking does 50% pulse just 100 shot no.... no matter what jets you have in it you are getting a fraction of a second of that whole hit ... so if its 200 400 500 etc you get that full shot on the progressive.... but not all at once... thats why some guys will tell you not to ramp out timing and some will say its okay..... it all happens very quick though!!! I hope I'm explaining it correctly
 

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The nitrous guy
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The jets are the jets and solenoids are open or closed, there is no in between. So a 200hp tune is a 200hp tune. The progressive works by supplying that 200hp tune in short bursts vs a steady flow. So while the shot is the shot, it controls what the motor sees power wise, by cycling the solenoids X amount of times a second. This is also only effective early in the run and at lower rpms. Meaning that if you set your progressive at 50% and make a full pull, it will NOT slow the car down to what it would run with a smaller tune. In fact it will slow the car very little
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong but a progressive controller just changes the duty cycle of the solenoid, still giving 200 shot for shorter periods of time but overall consuming less nitrous throughout the run due to less solenoid runtime.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Not how a progressive works, the motor is still getting the 200 shot, the progressive is just basically turning it on and off cycling the solenoids.
I know how a progressive works. Just trying to figure out if the percentage chosen for the start of the ramp is actually a percentage of the total tune. Based on Monte's response, it's not.

200 shot dont progress :D
Hypothetical numbers! :-D

The jets are the jets and solenoids are open or closed, there is no in between. So a 200hp tune is a 200hp tune. The progressive works by supplying that 200hp tune in short bursts vs a steady flow. So while the shot is the shot, it controls what the motor sees power wise, by cycling the solenoids X amount of times a second. This is also only effective early in the run and at lower rpms. Meaning that if you set your progressive at 50% and make a full pull, it will NOT slow the car down to what it would run with a smaller tune. In fact it will slow the car very little
Thanks, Monte. So the percentage chosen for start of the ramp, is that the duty cycle of the solenoid rather than some percentage of the total tune that is in the kit?

Of course, after reading the rest of the posts, I sound like a parrot to sbcnos. :-D

Thanks, guys!
 

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One thing I don't like about a progressive controller is fuel when activated and shut of doesn't really atomise, worse case scenario is goes into cylinder raising compression causing damage, most likely all good but it's something I hate you just have to watch the accel pump discharge and see initial fuel isn't properly atomised and yes always been the case but the quest for perfection these little things bug me.
 

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One thing I don't like about a progressive controller is fuel when activated and shut of doesn't really atomise, worse case scenario is goes into cylinder raising compression causing damage, most likely all good but it's something I hate you just have to watch the accel pump discharge and see initial fuel
isn't properly atomised and yes always been the case but the quest for perfection these little things bug me.
So removing a programmer and tuning on timing system like msd grid is a better set up ??
 

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A programmer has its advantages failsafes datalogger, I run a msd pro grid and a programmer and others as well which is messy but at the time I couldn't get a one does all.
Monty started a topic here in the Holley computer as a one does all recently and sounds really good worth a read and maybe a chat with him I like the sound of it and maybe one day I'll go that way.
And I do like ramping in nitrous as it's easier on parts,
Seeing fuel not atomising is something that bugs me and I want to fix.
 

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Probably the easiest way to explain this would be to screenshot a ocilliscope reading of the solenoids showing the duty cycle of the solenoids throughout a progressive ramp.
This would clearly show the on/of time.
 

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Thanks for the info sbcnos
I run a nos programmer nothing special and still pull timing mechanical. Old school safe I guess.
But I do have a programmable msd box I haven't used.
Step up to the times. you will not regret it.
 

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Try not to get caught up in the science and nomenclature of this. Progressing a noid is basically fluttering a valve. Numbers are just numbers. Your window or ramp is what you work with, 0-100%, 0-x.xx seconds. I've found most are fully open at around 70% anyway. So whatever reason your progressing, wheels up, no prep or whatever, start at 10-15% and hold it the longest, say 1.6 sec to 100%. Then close the window from there. I never liked to ramp timing. All out at the drop of the hammer.
 

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Ramping timing while activating NOS progressive controller is a dangerous game, you're better off pulling all timing at start of build time. how do you quantify amount of timing vs NOS when solenoid is pulsating?
 

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It seems progressive controllers as simple as they are end up being one of the more confusing hinges for many.

As mentioned, the percentage on a controller is percentage of duty cycles, NOT HP.

Another myth, many claim progressives are hard on solenoids. NOT TRUE. The hardest thing on the solenoids is NITROUS PRESSURE. High pressure, long durations of pressure, and pressure rushing the solenoid.

ax far as the fuel and atomization goes. Even during progression you get atomization. The nitrous shears the fuel as well as the sir in the ports.

Another effect on progressive control is the orifice in the solenoids used.

Three of the most important factors in consistent control. Voltage, pressure, and hertz used. Many say you cannot progress at this percent or that. In many cases this is bad info. If the parameters are correct you can do a lot more with a controller then many think.

Hope this helps guys.
 

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Well put me in the "totally misunderstood how progressive controllers worked" bunch.

I understand now how they work on or off and it should of been clear, so now then what is the point of using one? If I ran 50% for 4 sec isn't that the same as just spraying 100% for 2 sec? It just doesn't seem like a good idea to hit the engine on/off like that.
 
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