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Smart Ass Conservative
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Yeah, I have heard that it will spontaneously combust under the right conditions. Is that true?
Yes but that's why they don't bale it wet . That was a big bale not a small person size
 

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^ you bet your butt it will! Wet ain't good but just a bit too green is a recipe for a burned stack. My hay stacks were more like organized piles with plenty of breathing room to let it dry out. Not on purpose, mind you, I was just a shitty hay stacker. Probably still would be if I ever tried it again which is NEVER happening!
 

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I assume there must be some regulation or rule of thumb determining the length of a rope used to lift a load by helicopter. Anybody know what that is and what determines it? The ropes seem quite long at times. Is it some multiple of the main rotor diameter?
 

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Yeah, I have heard that it will spontaneously combust under the right conditions. Is that true?
I wouldn’t doubt it. There was a company near here that sells mulch and we passed there one day with the fire department hosing down this huge mound of smoldering mulch. We noticed some time later that there were now multiple smaller piles instead of the one large one.
 

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I think moisture content is the trigger. Same with sawdust/wood shavings/mulch. I helped change a cab on a truck that burned from a load of wood shavings parked overnight that caught fire.
 

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Fermenting vegetation that's not dried/cured enough will whoop up some serious heat. There still has to be some that's dry enough to spontaneously combust, probably why silage doesn't since it's basically sauerkraut for cattle.
I baled alfalfa for a few years out of high school as part of a demonstration by my Dad to show me a few jobs I damned sure didn't want. Working in a cotton gin was another. We're dry here, alfalfa will cure in 3 - 5 days, sometimes less with a good crimper. We have to bale early morning - 2ish most times. If it got too damp if and when morning dew came in around sunup, we got a break for an hour or two, then could usually bale for another hour or two before it got too dry and shattered. Worked a good part of the county doing custom cutting and baling, all little squares with twine. I blame my insomnia on that, I wake up every fucking morning around time to go to the field.
 
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