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In the early 80's I drove a fuel truck in Virginia. One of my jobs was to fuel N&W's Class J Loco #611 when it came to Norfolk. N&W ran 611 pulling an excursion train (from Roanoke I think) back then. It was one of the coolest trains I've ever seen.

View attachment 60950
I never cared for streamlined steam locomotives until i saw this one up close at the VA Museum of Transportation in Roanoke (before the recent restoration work). Check out Class J 611 | Virginia Museum of Transportation for more about her. Hopefully they will run some excursions again this year!
 

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Smart Ass Conservative
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Cool pics
 

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Behind Enemy Lines In Ca.
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That is one strange locomotive. An 0-6-6-0. Plus the location of the front driving cylinders. I found this:

"The only compound Mallets to operate in Canada were the R1 class 0-6-6-0 Vaughan design locomotives, with the cylinder ends of the engine units facing each other. The class was owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway and served on the Big Hill in British Columbia, which had a 4.1% grade. Five locomotives were built between 1909 and 1911. A sixth one was built, but it was a simple expansion Mallet with two sets of high-pressure cylinders. All the locomotives in this class were later converted to 2-10-0 types and were used as shunting and transfer engines in Montreal. "
 

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That photograph was taken right at the Bottom of the Big Hill, a couple miles east of Field. At the Spiral Tunnels viewpoint, another mile east (uphill) from about where this picture was taken, there is a chunk of the top of a steam engine. It's a piece of heavy cast, easily 1000 lbs, from one of these engines that suffered a boiler explosion. It landed half a mile from where the locomotive blew up. The crew did not survive, if you can imagine.
 
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