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Discussion Starter #1
I know none of you are lawyers but maybe one of you are safety reps at your work so here is a hypothetical question for you about a friend of mine:
lets say you were promoted to a supervisor position and one of your duties was shop safety, during you daily duties you notice things that you think are not safe (general workplace safety) and in OSHA violation so you bring them up to your boss. your boss says its not a violation. ironically you have a family member who is the safety manager for a huge nationally known industrial production company, you tell him what conspired and he says your boss is wrong your in violation and it needs to be corrected. so you tell your boss what that person said and what his position is at said company and your boss says that its bull shit and companies like his have to comply to that rule but smaller companies like ours don't.

so time pass's and other osha rules are broke due to the same excuse (on a weekly basis) that it doesn't apply to us etc. now your fed up and looking for another job and one of the things you want to do on your own is get your OSHA-30 cert to ad to your resume. so here's the last questions, once you pass your OSHA-30 and you hold that cert and still work for that company would that cert give you the power to force your employer to comply to osha safety standards and on the flips side if you don't tell them you have your OSHA -30 cert and someone gets hurt and OSHA comes in , what position will that put the holder of the cert in who is the safety manager and didn't enforce what he was taught all be it because the employer says it doesn't apply to them so don't enforce it?
whats your take on this?:cool:
 

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just go to osha's website, pull up the regulation, print it out and give it to your boss. as a construction foreman I deal with stuff like that all the time, even have to carry a osha handbook in my backpack. the fines are steep and they can fine both the individual and the company
 

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Discussion Starter #6
obviously this is a serious question that will be looked into further with the right people, I'm just asking the YB crowd what they think as they are kicking back like me drinking a cold one on a friday night. I like to get insight from the boots on the ground or shit they've seen etc..
 

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Ultimately the company owner is responsible for the safety of his employees. OSHA sets the minimum requirement for safety in the workplace. If OSHA was to inspect your plACE OF Employment and found violatons they would issue fines to the company. They can be very costly. If an employee is injured he/she can sue for his injury. If you are personally aware and you are charged with the safety on your job site then you could be sued personally if you knowingly did nothing to correct the situation. This is not the norm though. To be osha compliant your company must have a safety program and a safety manual. The employees must receive and sign that they have received, read and understand the policies. I have a 30 hour certification. Mine is in the construction field. The regulations are quite stringent.
 

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You are in a bad position.
 

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Keep you email chain on a thumb drive where it can't be deleted - CYA
Them IT boys do what the boss says and emails vanish

then drop a dime on him to OSHA

Do what's right - not what is the easiest
But get your cert and find a new job - you don't want to work for a cheat

;)
 

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If your boss/company doesn't want to let you to do your job there is no way to win. The only chance you have is to WRITE down your observations, state where it violates OSHA, add a recommendation then send it to your boss in an email. If he ignores it just keep moving forward.

That way at least you won't be back on this site starting a thread about how they made you the fall guy after something went wrong and someone got hurt. Sometimes the best you an do is CYA or get a new job.
 

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He needs to send the concerns in an email to the decision makers and other safety managers. After that, the problems are brought to everyone's attention and there is a paper trail. He will be protected under whistle blower laws. (Not saying they wouldnt try to fire him for other reasons, but they better have their shit straight if they do)

Tree'd..thanks topfun! Spot on!
 

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If your boss/company doesn't want to let you to do your job there is no way to win. The only chance you have is to WRITE down your observations, state where it violates OSHA, add a recommendation then send it to your boss in an email. If he ignores it just keep moving forward.

That way at least you won't be back on this site starting a thread about how they made you the fall guy after something went wrong and someone got hurt. Sometimes the best you an do is CYA or get a new job.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ DOCUMENT EVERYTHING!^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
 

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1-800-321-OSHA

Regional office was a mile from the plant I worked at. I called from a pay phone in the lunch room.
 

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what I think I would do is stop talking to boss about the issue face to face, send the issues to the boss in an E-Mail so it is on record as well as his reply or lack of reply. That might cover the guys butt if shit hits the fan with OSHA. Thats all I have to offer .
 

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I'd suggest NOT going to OSHA first thing. Most guys like that are just hardheaded and resistant to change "how we've always done it" and not malicious. OSHA would put a big hurt on him to make a point and hurt the entire company including all the employees. If you can show him a better way and that it really needs to be that way, you can probably create constructive change. OSHA is self funding, meaning they use the fines they collect to fund their operations, so they are motivated to enact fines whenever possible.



Fortunately for you, IUP (Indiana University of PA) has a OSHA compliance program funded by the state of PA. You can call them with questions, and they will offer to come to your site and inspect the operation for safety infractions without contacting OSHA. They will give you a written report of their findings with recommendations on how to fix it. As long as there are no immediate dangers to life and limb (like workers in trenches without trench boxes, or maintenance techs forced to work on running machinery) they will keep it between you and them. They are intimately familiar with the local OSHA offices and how each one enforces the rules so they can advice you what is most important to the inspectors in that office and what they look for and how.


I had them in to my shop years ago. They gave me a list of important issues and a list of less important issues. None were hugely expensive, just PITAs, like rerunning some old wiring on the ceiling inside conduit, putting weight load limits signs on the roof of the office where old records are stored, posting a sign pointing to fire extinguishers, putting all the MSDS sheets in a binder and a sign pointing to the binder and a written record of all the sheets in the binder in the office somewhere, etc. Bigger operations need more paperwork to record injuries, etc. After I got the report, I had a month or two to report back that all the issues had been handled, but they never came back to inspect. They CAN convince your boss that he needs to clean up his operation or suffer the consequences.



They can also answer your questions about your responsibility with authority and without risk to you.
 

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here's the last questions, once you pass your OSHA-30 and you hold that cert and still work for that company would that cert give you the power to force your employer to comply to osha safety standards and on the flips side if you don't tell them you have your OSHA -30 cert and someone gets hurt and OSHA comes in , what position will that put the holder of the cert in who is the safety manager and didn't enforce what he was taught all be it because the employer says it doesn't apply to them so don't enforce it?
whats your take on this?:cool:
Fucking A, you sound like a power-hungry trouble making bitch. If what you're talking about is such an egregious OSHA violation and you fail to report it to OSHA you would be equally complicit in the eyes of the law.

I'm familiar with the OSHA 500 cert and even with that, you have no right or power to 'force' your employer to do anything.
 

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LOL
OSHA 30 cert here (it sucks, boring as hell)

It means jack shit for you telling your employer anything. Not every job site has to be OSHA approved and that title means dick to your employer other than he can put you on OSHA sites with your dumb badge.
 
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