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Discussion Starter #1
i was given a camera that has original box looks from early 70s was a relatives that passed
Minolta srt101 slr 35mm

i have no exp with cameras at all or film for that matter , just wondering if this type of camera is capable of taking nice photos ?
is there a certain type of film that would be best to used in this camera for most all around use ?

much appreciated
 

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film? thats going backwards, could be fun though. That camera will take great pics, 400 film will work 200 might be better all around.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
film? thats going backwards, could be fun though. That camera will take great pics, 400 film will work 200 might be better all around.
not sure just figuared was given to me and looked like it was in nice shape , but im sure technology has taken its course on film and digital is the way to go i assume .
 

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not sure just figuared was given to me and looked like it was in nice shape , but im sure technology has taken its course on film and digital is the way to go i assume .
it's hard to even sell a film camera these days.....unless you want to do your own darkroom magic, its really a burden, more than anything.....however, there are many enthusiasts. If nothing else, the glass may be useful. :p
 

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Film has a nice 'feel' to it. yes it will take nice pictures, but how do you want to see them? On a computer - then you'll have to scan the film. As prints, then you want print film - who's going to print it? Walgreens or the local shop? quality will vary because they dont do much film any more. Want to see your pictures as slides, then you need slide film and a slide projector.
I'm an old film guy, I still love film, but digital makes better images for screen or print. Now if you want to do darkroom work, develop film and make your own prints that camera would be great! All depends on what you want
 

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I have a bunch of top shelf, premo manual focus Minolta stuff and it's worth zero. Depressing. Capable of taking excellent photos. One of my bodies is a SRT-102 that I used as a back-up. Mechanical, needs no batteries if you aren't using the meter function.

Throw in thousands of dollars worth of darkroom equipment (color & B&W) also worth nothing. :(

Can't get myself to throw it away. I get the camera stuff out once-in-awhile to fondle it.
 

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I would not screw with film. On a side note, there are a few camera bodies you can adapt old manual lenses and have fun from time to time. Canon is fairly adaptable, you can get adapters for Pentax bayonet, the old M42 screw mount, Yashica and Olympus. You cannot shoot at infinity using Minolta, Konica, or old Canon FL/FD film lenses because the film/ sensor plane is too short.

This photo was taken with an Olympus mount lens, 28mm 2.8 adapted to (my then) Canon 40D



This was taken with a Nikkor 180mm 2.8 adapted to my old Canon Xt

 

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Just looking back at this thread reminded me of one of the most pleasing things about digital images. Look at the sky in the two pictures above. Just perfect, not a single spec of dust, scratch, emulsion defect. Digital is just so clean. I did a high res scan of one of my 35 mm slides. Most of my time fiddling with it was spent removing dust specs, etc. It's like listening to vinyl vs. digital.....very clean.
 

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Agreed. But using actual film IMO requires a certain amount of skill that digital doesn't require. What's the difference?
It's kind of like racing an automatic versus a stick. LOTS of people do well with a stick & the modern day electronics. Put them in an old school gasser with no driver assist & see how well they do.
Film allows you to "play", and understand the process of picture taking, not just taking a picture. The trick admittedly is finding a place the has film and can develop it well.....
 

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Agreed. But using actual film IMO requires a certain amount of skill that digital doesn't require. What's the difference?
It's kind of like racing an automatic versus a stick. LOTS of people do well with a stick & the modern day electronics. Put them in an old school gasser with no driver assist & see how well they do.
Film allows you to "play", and understand the process of picture taking, not just taking a picture. The trick admittedly is finding a place the has film and can develop it well.....

You don't HAVE to shoot "full automatic" which is why I posted the photos I did.........these were both taken with old manual focus lenses. And any decent digi can be set up to use manual settings


In some ways digital cameras require MORE skill than film, because film (in general terms) had a wider range of dynamic exposure than does a digital sensor, meaning the exposure has to be closer, and if you are taking photos with a wide range ---in/ out of shade, etc, you actually have to me more careful
 
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