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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never replaced main bearings while the motor is still together. I've always replaced them in the winter while rebuilding the motor. I never had the need to replace them mid season. I just pulled the pan and found the rear thrust was destroyed. It's on the engine stand right now and I'm trying to avoid taking the top end back apart. Is there a way to carefully slip the shells out and replace them without lifting the crankshaft out?
 

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I can only suggest to do it right while the engine is on the stand.

I'd want to look at the crank really well, especially at the thrust flange and flush the block of any crap that might have found its way through the oil.

Good luck.
 

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I'm with Horndog. You can easily roll new bearings in the motor but if the thrust bearing is destroyed the crank is probably hurt and where did all that bearing material go? Pushed out to the cyl walls and piston skirts and slung into the cam? I'd want to look. RM
 

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I guess the 1st question I would ask is, what made you pull the pan and look at the rear main in the first place? 2nd What was in your filter and in the bottom of the pan? 3rd what can be done to make sure it doesn't happen again? And than I will agree with Horndog and Real McCoy.
 

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just replaced them that way. just slide them in. I had to pick the crank up a little to slide them in. but I made it happen.
 

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There is actually a small stud type tool that fits in the oil hole of the crank and as you turn the crank it rolls the bearing out since the head is thinner than the bearing is thick. Years ago when my friend had a 427 FE powered 66 Fairlane we rolled bearings in it several times a year and never took the motor out of the car. Junk bearings and oiling systems back then caused racers lots of issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I guess the 1st question I would ask is, what made you pull the pan and look at the rear main in the first place? 2nd What was in your filter and in the bottom of the pan? 3rd what can be done to make sure it doesn't happen again? And than I will agree with Horndog and Real McCoy.
We had to repair the engine block from a wheelstand that broke the front boss of the block.

While the motor was out of the car I thought it would be a good opportunity to check the bearings. Chunks of the rear thrust bearing was in the oil pan. The oil pump was taken apart and it was clean no bearing materail in the pump. Oil filter will be cut apart tomorrow. I had never seen a bearing come apart like this. It was like it de-laminated from the shell and flaked off. I think it was from the wheelstand this past weekend and the flange of the crank smacked the rear thrust. It would flake off with the slightest finger pressure so if it was done before I would think it would have all flaked off before now. All of the bearings look great everywhere else in the motor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There is actually a small stud type tool that fits in the oil hole of the crank and as you turn the crank it rolls the bearing out since the head is thinner than the bearing is thick. Years ago when my friend had a 427 FE powered 66 Fairlane we rolled bearings in it several times a year and never took the motor out of the car. Junk bearings and oiling systems back then caused racers lots of issues.
I thought about trying to make something just like you described. I was thinking of using a dowel pin in the oil hole but thought what happens if it drops all the way down that hole? That would make a mess. I thought about what would happen to the saddle if the tool moved away from the crankshaft. I would think it would scratch the saddles. I guess it needs chamfers so it doesn't damage the saddles. If you happen to see that tool let me know. It seams simple enough
 

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Try an aluminium drive rivet or make something that looks like one in a lath. Brass would work too. It's soft. won't scratch nothing. Just file the rounded head flat so it is slightly thinner than the bearing. The bigger head won't let it go into the crank hole. Never did a motor with a belt drive so keep and eye on the front bearing. Maybe tight from the belt. RM
 

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I did it in my SBC last November and it worked great...I put new Rod & Main bearings in it by loosening the mains all the way across and slightly lifting up on the crank by hand with one hand and slipping the bearings out with a tiny screwdriver and my other bare hand. Once the bearing begins to move a tiny bit your bare hand can pull it right out unless something is killed in there.

I used a ton of assembly lube too...Valco Cincinnati Consumer Products Inc. "Gellube" It comes in a aerosol can and I washed everything down very good with it.

That motor wasnt hurt to begin with but I changed them as insurance since the bearings had 80,000 unknown miles on them. Now they are brand new and not a bit of worry. I also replaced the oil pump and timing chain while I was at it. Oil pressure is better and its happy.

(The timing chain was killed so I was glad I pulled mine apart, I had to take the pan off the weld in the turbo drain fitting is the only reason my pan came off)


LOL, Big turbo on stock motor....It wont last too long....
 

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Use a cotter pin. Spread the two ends 180 degrees apart & stick the eyelet end into the oil hole. Rotate crank & the two ends will catch the bearing & roll it out. I learned that little trick from my good friend Rick.
 

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hey flyin brian, im pretty sure my buddy has the monte carlo you show on your homepage sitting in his garage. nice car
 
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