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Ok so me and the wife plan to build a log cabin in the next few years plan on being 2500-3200sqft not including finished basement. I would like to hear all the pros and cons from first hand experienced owners. Also please post pictures of your houses if you don't mind to give us ideas. We will be building up on a wooded hill over looking a 4-6 acer lake. Can't remember exact size but it's pretty big. One of my really good friends restores log cabins for a living so he will be helping with the build. Also looking for old cabins that are ready to be tore down and redone if anyone has one to sell or knows of some.
 

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I, too, am looking, so no direct experience. However, my cousin and her husband built in the hills above Visalia, CA, after moving from a boat they'd occupied for years. Quite the change, to say the least. The husband is an engineer and very handy. He did a great deal of research on these types of buildings and got ideas from other folks, just as you are doing. He personally viewed the prefit, where the company pretty much puts the building together to ensure proper fit. He also checked all the runs for utility lines and pipes and had a few changed to better accomodate his needs. The place is spectacular and they have been happily in it for 5 years. Personal supervision, based on solid research, is the key.
 

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Thanks. I plan in doing old style hand hewn logs thought not any of this log cabin kit crap they offer now days. However I have found a few kits I like but overall like the original hand hewn look much more
 

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Might want to check to make sure you can insure it first.

A lot of the major insurers won't insure log cabins anymore.
 

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State Farm insures mine. Other than more maintenance they are awesome. Very cheap on hvac use.
 

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maintenence is huge on them
 

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Yea I knew maintenance was high. And I knew they were good and hvac. I've only heard of the insurance thing just recently I need to find out more about it.
 

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They get sealed on outside so termites no more problem than a reg. house. Builder recommended a breathable sealer so should have to redo it every 5 years. My logs are pressure treated with a wax so even carpenter bees leave them alone. Soffits are another story. Inside unfinished and visitors comment on wood smell is nice. 2 corners maybe shrunk an inch. Rest is fine. Energy bills are cheap, which is surprising as logs are not the best insulators. Roof is tin on plywood on rigid foam on 1x6's and makes popping noises with changing sun and temps. Get a large covered deck And some comfortable Adirondack rockers. I did wide board white pine floors and they did split some and are very soft. I would go yellow and narrower next time.
 

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Lived in one for over 10 years, it wasn't "high maintenance". It takes awhile to settle once its been put together permanently (most will have been assembled on site, then de-assembled and shipped to you, with instructions on where each log goes). I wasn't really a fan, I like a "comfortable" home and logs everywhere you look + hardwood flooring got a little old. The downstairs was carpet and you wouldn't have known it was a log home if thats all you saw though.

Meh, my mom just sold it actually, took awhile to find the right buyer but still got over 350K for it on a 1 acre lot (in a little town with no jobs, sold it to a retired couple)
 

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I bought a cabin a few years ago that was built in 1975ish..As everyone said, maintenance is higher on them. The guy that had it before us let it sit for a few years and missed a few maintenance cycles. DO NOT do that and don't skimp on the build. I checked into estimates to have the home blasted and it is stupid expensive so I'm doing it myself in addition to remodeling the interior. So maintenance is high, but as with everything you get out what you put in. I live on the side of a mountain and there ain't nothing like watching our herd of deer walking up the back 40 or watching the town 4th of july fireworks from our back deck.
 

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I have lived in one on and off since 1994. It still belongs to my mom but I may actually buy the house one day :) There has been some maintenance issues for sure though. The house was built in 1984 I believe. We had to replace several logs on one wall where water had gotten around the windows over the years and rotted the logs. Probably could have been avoided with better maintenance by the PO. Now lately due to the new logs twisting and the method by which they replaced them, another log has tried to squeeze out of the wall that is 90* to the repaired wall. I am pretty sure we are looking at replacing some more logs since these ones have warped so badly.

We have always had issues with carpenter bees boring into the exterior but other then the holes they leave, no problems have arisen from that.

Temperature changes make it creak and pop but I honestly like the noises. It is a pretty cozy home with lot's of character and I really want to keep it but the maintenance worries me alot. It is on 8 acres in a very desirable county AND it has a huge garage that is basically the entire basement and will fit 8 cars if need be.
 

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We seriously thought about going log home, but I'm busy enough without that extra maintenance. They tend to cost more per sq ft to build, and the market you are selling to is smaller than conventional homes. So you may have to wait for the right buyer. Banks don't always cooperate with the lending, again because they cost more per sq ft, and don't always appraise more per sq ft. I knew a couple that had one fairly large, and they had two bids around $10,000 to reseal it, which should be done every couple years. That tells me that it must be quite a bit of work even if they were high bids.
 

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Been in one since '92, western red cedar logs, bugs seem to leave it alone. Maintenance amounts to coating the logs every four years, I like products made by Flood. Very minimal settling, make sure your builder knows what he's doing, especially fitting windows and doors. Financing can be an issue. I've had no problems with insurance rates being higher than a conventional house.
 

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I have 2 friends with them.Neither would do it again.Enormous maintainance costs.Lots of bug problems.But thats in wis.,don't know about milder climates.
 

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My folks have had their house since 1984. No a lot of issues with maintenance. Cover the windows with feed sacks and spray the house. They used a Northeastern Log Home. Came with Anderson Windows, Peachtree and Morgan doors.
 
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