Yellow Bullet Forums banner

1 - 20 of 47 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
On my very unlevel floor in the house I just moved into there is one plank of laminate that is lifted on its end and it wont snap back down and in by pushing on it. Is there another solution?

The sides and other end seem attached, but it is very obvious when entering the room that one is lifted. It also has nice molding installed that I am hoping not to have to pry off to remove boards back to this particular piece.

Cheers! Appreciate the help
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I currently have all of my worldly possessions on that floor excluding garage stuff while I pain the dining/kitchen/bath/hallway before we settle in. Cant get pictures for a bit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
One piece somehow came unlodged there and wouldnt kick back down (didnt try a mallet yet in fear of breaking the "wood")

I just need to get that one end down and I will use my suction cup handle to even the gap

If the floor gets pulled, its getting relevelled and redone
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
665 Posts
They usually do not un-click.
Once you disassemble it, you will likely find out the tongue snapped off due to excessive movement.
If the subfloor isn't flat, it rests as a unit on the high spots, and every step over a low spot flexes the edge, and snaps the tongues.
 

·
Jack Stand Racer
Joined
·
6,463 Posts
if you end pulling the floor apart to fix ... use glue when putting it back together... makes a huge difference on keeping it together ....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,768 Posts
You wouldn't have that problem if you had CARPET...Cheap ass laminate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
The right way to fix it is to pull up the floor up to that point.
The wrong way(the way I would do it) is to take a utility knife and slice off the little tongue, get some liquid nails glue in there and push it back down and put a dumbbell or something on it overnight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,045 Posts
The right way to fix it is to pull up the floor up to that point.
The wrong way(the way I would do it) is to take a utility knife and slice off the little tongue, get some liquid nails glue in there and push it back down and put a dumbbell or something on it overnight.
^^^^ this is about the best temporary fix you can hope for. It may only last a day, a week or a month, or it may hold up for a couple of years. You never know. I'd say it's worth a try if your next best option is to pull up the floor anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,356 Posts
I have had success prying the tongue back in gently with small pocket screwdrivers. Starting at one end and going towards the other, then a rubber mallet with a block of wood to set it. Good Luck. Birdtracker
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I am the owner of a flooring distribution operation in So FLA.....


If you are having peaking in the center of the room, it could be from a few things but if the subfloor this laminate is installed in is very unlevel, you will continue to have problems with it regardless if you "spot fix" this.

Can you tell if there is a specific hump in the subfloor right where this board is ? If not, meaning its just like the sub floor around it, you should check around the perimeter of the room to see if proper expansion was allowed. The floor should of been cut short approx 1/4" from the walls which usually hides from the baseboard or Quarter Round. If the floor is "butted" to the wall or existing tile etc, it will generally start peaking in the middle of the room
 

·
On the roller...
Joined
·
15,881 Posts
I am the owner of a flooring distribution operation in So FLA.....


If you are having peaking in the center of the room, it could be from a few things but if the subfloor this laminate is installed in is very unlevel, you will continue to have problems with it regardless if you "spot fix" this.

Can you tell if there is a specific hump in the subfloor right where this board is ? If not, meaning its just like the sub floor around it, you should check around the perimeter of the room to see if proper expansion was allowed. The floor should of been cut short approx 1/4" from the walls which usually hides from the baseboard or Quarter Round. If the floor is "butted" to the wall or existing tile etc, it will generally start peaking in the middle of the room
This is pretty much what I was thinking, but I'm no expert on that flooring type. It sounds to me like it's laid too tight or secured around the edges. Here we are in the summer and it's pushed up the center. Just a guess?
 
1 - 20 of 47 Posts
Top