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I'm a solder guy, because that's what I was trained to do 40 years ago in the US Navy.
Thats kinda odd because ABYC standards require crimps.

IIRC, the Air Force doesn't allow solder??
Thats because soldering creates a fatigue point in the wire. The solder wicking into the wire creates a point that is more prone to break.



Personally, I think both have their place. I also think that most people couldn't do either one correctly to save their lives. Its insane how often I have to fix hack wiring jobs.
 

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T/S 368E
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30,023 Posts
That's what I did when retired the 1st time. I rewired construction trailers that were completely hacked together.
Those morons were so dumb they would have different trucks matched to certain trailers because they didn't follow standard specs!!!!
Unbelievable what's on our roads!!!
They would just eliminate some of the brakes, and drive around with only 1/2 of them working towing 20,000 plus loads!!!

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That's what we use in communications construction now a days, all aluminum with the center conductor barely copper coated!!!
In the beginning it was pure copper center conductor, that stopped about 35 years ago.
We also piggy back RF & VAC, so if they think aluminum is good enough, I use what the supply??
Depending on the application, I'm okay with using it.

I don't use it anywhere that might get exposed to water, and I make sure that all terminals are sealed so that moisture can't wick into the wire.
 

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EFI/N2O JUNKIE
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My pump is in the rear. The power is fed from the dash. You could run 12ga wire 60ft at that amperage, and still be fine. As short of run a car is, 14ga would be fine. 12ga is overkill. People get ridiculous with wire ga. There is absolutely no reason to use 10ga wire for a feed to one 15 amp start 10 amp run load in a car ever. Save some weight, use the right size wire.
Yes, I go overkill for sure! No reason not to, we aren't racing heads-up.......
I have 2/0 from the battery to the feed through terminals in my firewall, for positive AND negative!
I have 10g from my battery (rear mounted) to a GOOD relay, then 10g from there to my fuel pump. I would say that wire is about 4 feet long at most, and it is for ground AND positive! I relay on the chassis ground for just about NOTHING.
My fuel pump relay +12 volt in (to turn it on) also goes through my 4-pole battery disconnect switch, so if that switch gets pushed-in, it kills +12v in the car AND the fuel pump relay. With EFI, you kill the fuel pump and the engine stops instantly.
 

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T/S 368E
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30,023 Posts
Thats kinda odd because ABYC standards require crimps.



Thats because soldering creates a fatigue point in the wire. The solder wicking into the wire creates a point that is more prone to break.



Personally, I think both have their place. I also think that most people couldn't do either one correctly to save their lives. Its insane how often I have to fix hack wiring jobs.

I'm old, my ship & equipment was from the 50's, and had 100's of tubes.
It was definitely full of soldered connections.

 
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