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Oh and what are you guys using for 3/4 ID hose? Something that maintains shape while bending I guess, rather not do AN because of the necking down of the ID in the fittings. Anything clear that works good so you can visually see air in the system, maybe for the last run into the intercooler brick use something like that
 

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I just sent an email to Lingenfelter but figured I'd post here too given the wealth of info on the forums.

Stewart WP29 reprogrammed pump feeding into 1.25" silicone (NOT hardline) hose to a2w core, back through more 1.25" silicone back to 5 ish gallon tank. AITs are rising during a run more than I think they should. Amp clamp shows Stewart pump pulling 26 amps when I override the relay on. Either the core is undersized for what I'm trying to do (which is possible, I'm on a smaller turbo running high boost...a bigger turbo at low boost wouldn't see as bad of a problem), or there's a restriction because of the soft silicone lines.

According to LF, the reprogrammed pump will pull 19-25 amps. I assume 19 amps is on a low restriction setup, and it has a 25 or 26 amp limit.

Has anyone found a cheap and vaguely accurate inline flow meter? Either they are a few hundred dollars, or stupid cheap but only meant for garden hoses and I would question their accuracy.

I *could* just buy 1.25" clear reinforced hose from Orme Brothers but don't want to do that if the restriction is the core.
 

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Follow up: was originally interested in a chart for the wp29 that showed flow vs amperage which would prove my theory right...so far I can only find pressure vs flow, and the links in this thread are broken anyways.

Thanks!
 

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If it is a centrifugal pump(which it is) your theory is exactly backwards. The lower the head pressure the higher the amps/hp. If it has a restriction in the discharge somewhere the amps will drop accordingly. If you go to a dead head condition (closed discharge) the pump will unload and amps will drop sharply. This is how all centrifugal pumps, fans turbos etc operate. You may have a residence time issue since it looks like the pump is running off the right side of the pump flow/hp curve. All refrigeration calculations contain a time value that the work is to be done in. 12000btu/hr is the same as 200btu/min. If you can tell exactly how much ice you are meeting in a given time you can calculate the actual load on the system and work being done. A BTU is the amount of heat it takes to change 1LB of water 1*F. Sensible heat is what you can see change on a thermometer. Latent heat of fusion is where the real work gets done. It takes 144btu to melt 1LB of 32*F ice into 1LB of 32*F water. It only takes 1btu to change 1LB of water from 32*F to 33*F. When the phase change is done(ice melted) the party is over. Hope this helps.
 

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I appreciate the post but in lingenfelters testing they found the amp draw to increase when there is a restriction on the discharge side. I don't know if the stock programming limits pump rpm or pump amperage either, so if my setup has too much restriction, amperage would stay clamped but flow would suffer. I think haha, depends how the pump computer is set up.

Might go to Lowe's tomorrow and grab some of that clear reinforced hose.
 
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