Yellow Bullet Forums banner

41 - 60 of 61 Posts

·
Prick Pro PhotoG
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Discussion Starter #41
Unfortunately for you guys, I don't think it's a matter of informing them up front. It's a great idea and the few who respect it, it will help. The real issue you are dealing with is respect for your work. My guess is 95% of the people stealing your work will do it whether warned or not and only take them down when asked. I'm on your side but a tough battle.

People steal our tuning all the time. Unfortunately, we really have no recourse at all when that happens.

I disagree, It is a photographers responsibility to inform the customer what they can and cannot do with photos that the customer is purchasing. The first card anyone ever plays when it comes to copyright infringement is the "I didnt know" Card.

I shoot onsite at events and run a sales booth, I print everything out onsite while they are waiting. On my table posted next to the customer viewing monitor is a "Terms of Purchase Agreement", also when they get their prints from me, as I of my employee is putting their photos in an envelope, we inform them that included in the envelope there is a "Terms of Purchase" agreement in their that states what they can and cannot do. And I or my employee also inform them that along with that purchase agreement that options to purchase digital negatives, limited use web images, and additional prints, for commercial and other use are also on their, as well as my full contact information.

The thing I have going for me is that I have a pretty set customer base, as I see a lot of the same people over and over. But even with new customers, I have my basis covered and my customers are informed, that way if they do break the rules they cannot play the "I didnt know" card.

And it seems to work. I also sell strictly Images for Facebook for a cheap price, the stuff is watermarked of course.

One thing I started doing this year and it cut down on most of the theft from my website. Everything that I put up now a days on my website (not facebook) I have a big watermark over the whole photo, and it states that the photo is copyrighted, and if this image is seen outside of my website please report it and it has my email address. Since I started doing that I have not found a single image of mine taken off my website. I also have disclaimers everywhere and they have to enter their email address to enter the galleries.

Now one thing I have done and its easy for me since I have a pretty set customer base, is I go and take every print that I sell, and I crop it down to 72 dpi, I water mark it, and include "Facebook Use Only" and I upload a customer print album on the Facebook of the Organization that I shoot for. And I inform my customers of this when they buy prints, and I also explain to them that the images I put up on Facebook is to say thank you to the customer, and that the images are only to be used on their Facebook and no other site, or any commercial use. Doing so has cut down dramatically on the amount of people who take a picture of the print , because usually most of the time they are taking pics of the prints just to post on Facebook.
 

·
Prick Pro PhotoG
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Discussion Starter #42
Yeah but whats the procedure? I mean I'm not going to send anyone an original pic to prove they are using it without permission...

I have not dealt with this before in a serious manner, thanks

Rob if it is on Facebook, there is an easy way to take care of this, you simple go on facebook and there are ways to report copyright infringement, you will have give them the links to the copyrighted images on that facebook page, and they will usually get them taken down.

Go to the photos on that facebook and click on one that is yours and click on options, and then click report photo and go from there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,424 Posts
I disagree, It is a photographers responsibility to inform the customer what they can and cannot do with photos that the customer is purchasing. The first card anyone ever plays when it comes to copyright infringement is the "I didnt know" Card. .

I think you missed my point Lonnie. This requires you to believe them when they said "I didn't know". Maybe I just have less faith in other people.
 

·
Prick Pro PhotoG
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Discussion Starter #44
I think you missed my point Lonnie. This requires you to believe them when they said "I didn't know". Maybe I just have less faith in other people.

It does not matter if you have faith in them or not, it is up to the photographer to inform the customer, that way they cannot use the I did not know card. And I have found that they usually wont try and play that card if they get caught.

Since I started actually informing my customers I have had less problems is what I am saying.

Also there are quite a lot of people out there that in all honesty do not know anything about copyright laws.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
732 Posts
It does not matter if you have faith in them or not, it is up to the photographer to inform the customer, that way they cannot use the I did not know card. And I have found that they usually wont try and play that card if they get caught.

Since I started actually informing my customers I have had less problems is what I am saying.

Also there are quite a lot of people out there that in all honesty do not know anything about copyright laws.
The Truth! /\ /\ /\
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,824 Posts
exif can be altered in seconds by anyone who knows how to use google..
To avoid this most professional photographers only shoot in RAW format and the customer gets a jpg, that is how you prove it is your image, if they do not have the original RAW file from the camera they stole it!
 

·
Prick Pro PhotoG
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Discussion Starter #55
Lonnie Gautreau thanks for sharing this wonderful information, But I think The fastest way to get sales on your website is to announce your website to your existing customers and also make some sign boards. Tell them all about copyrights it's my opinion.
I do, when I have a booth set up at an event to sell photos, I keep the information posted right next to the viewing screen, and there is a hand out put in the envelope when they purchase the print.
 

·
Prick Pro PhotoG
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Discussion Starter #57
Lonnie, is this a generic copyright form or is it personalized for you. Would love to get a version I can include with my prints
I wrote my own "Terms of Purchase Agreement"

It basically tells them that when they buy from me they agree to the conditions I have set fourth which also include copyright do's and dont's and has information on how to get what they need post event for different things like commercial digitals etc.
 

·
Im a Pro at being Amateur
Joined
·
9,638 Posts
Who took this one? Isn't that Rob in the background?

I want to say this is John Fore's pic, i think he was the only photo guy past me on this pass. it has been cropped considerably from the original.
 
41 - 60 of 61 Posts
Top