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Quoted for the truth!!!! I have NO reason but to try stuff because I only have to please myself. Two weekends ago I tried the same stuff and completely messed up the pics, boy was I pissed when I got home I should have known better but "You can't fix stupid". SO last weekend I thought WTH I have nothing to loose I'm gonna try it again, some worked others well........ Didn't, LOL.
Absolutely! When I have ideal conditions (lighting, track, racing division, etc) I start out in "safe mode" where I know my settings will give me excellent or at least very good results. I will then switch to "risky mode" in the hope of capturing a few stunning images as well.

Again all of this depends on the type of racing you are shooting and the purpose of being there.

Yeah, I've had more than one of those, "You can't fix stupid" events too! Just pick up the gear and go do it again!
 

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THIS ISN'T SAYING THAT ANY SHOOTING STYLE SUCKS, SIMPLY A GUIDE TO SHOOTING SLOWER

I personally am a big fan of motion. I have found that in drag racing, most shots are all shot in high shutter speeds, this isn't meaning anything is bad, but you get no sense of motion. I RARELY shoot racing in high shutter speeds and try to push people to try slower shutter shots. It really isn't that hard to shoot with motion and here is a guide I made awhile ago that I adjusted for drag racing.
When I shoot action, i just run the camera in shutter priority (TV






on canons) and let the camera figure out the lighting in MOST situations, and sometimes ill fine tune it with AE shifting. When panning a subject, the lighting changes a lot faster. Some situations I run full manual, generally in odd lighting conditions. Make sure you run AI servo and not single shot when shooting action, this allows the camera to continually focus.

The key really is a good lens with a good image stabilization system, this allows you to run a much lower shutter speed. Dont be fooled by some Canon lenses such as the 70-300. It has a single stage stabilizer that only stabilizes vertical movement. Make sure you get a 2 stage (only found in L glass) stabilizer that controls vertical and horizontal movement. There really isnt a formula to shooting action. Ive heard people say a 1MPH: 1MS shutter speed is good, but i dont quite agree with that, I would START with 1.5-2x and then go down from there.

the main points of shooting action are:
1) angle at which the object is traveling, I.E. coming at you, front 1/4 shot, side, rear 1/4, etc.
2) speed of whatever your shooting
3) your distance from where you are shooting
4) focal length (which can tie into 3)
5) lighting sometimes, if you have a good F lens, u dont have to worry about this so much

Side Bar on Burn Outs

I can look at a burn out picture and generally tell around where the shutter speed is just on how the smoke looks and don't really care for clumpy looking smoke. Don't be scared of running slow shutter shots on burn outs, it is easy and will make the smoke look more life like.



covering 1
Dont bother at trying to run a slow shutter on something coming straight at you. Whatever you might be shooting needs to be coming across you at some point to start getting a sense of motion. If im at a race in a photo hole shooting straight shots, I generally jack up the shutter pretty good, (1/250th) esp. if you cannot see much of the wheel rotation, This is really for only long range, head on shots (300mm+)



At that point you start getting the 1/4 shot, then shutter speed starts to become a factor.










Covers steps 2-4
When Im shooting with my telephoto at focal lock (or close to) at a good distance, your body movement isnt as fast, this allows you to run a slower shutter. keep in mind i have a 2.8L IS which is about the best lens for stabilization, allowing me to run really slow shutters. For non IS lenses, I would start at 1.3-1.5x the speed of whatever your shooting and then move down from there, not going below 50-60th.

Formula D Irwindale: car traveling about 40-50 mph, at focal lock, probably 30 yards away, shutter speed 1/50th. Yea I know it is drifting here, but it also applies to drag racing depending on lens length and lane.



The key is finding that sweet spot. Sometimes you can shoot REALLY slow, but can end up with a little more blur, in which basically your focus point is in focus, but the surrounding areas start to blur. Plus some drivers are faster then others. The below shot was probably either too close or too fast for the shutter speed selected.



DISTANCE

Generally, shorter the distance, shorter the focal, the less speed you can run. If your whipping your camera around fast, its going to be harder for you to hold that camera as still, allowing less shutter.



Launch shot with my 17-40 F4L, shutter was around 125th. As you can see, this is the same speed I was shooting cars traveling 50-60mph, but since it is MUCH closer, this really cuts your ability to run a slow shutter. Below, 1/80th at about 150MM



1/100th, 140 MPH on the brakes hard at about 180 MM

good pics
 

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Prick Pro PhotoG
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Going through old folders and found these from when they were trying to bring back Fun Ford Weekend.

Ennis Tx. 2011

No Flash, good natural lighting, and panning at 1/500th I did not add any blur during post process.




 

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Panning is great if not over done as in too many shots. The bike was shot 25 years ago on film. Any DSLR can do that. Slow shutter, all manual. This was shot with an old Minolta on slide with a sync of max 1/60s. Same with the old TF but no flash for Al Billes car. The street rod was shot intentionally at very low speed on slide as well but it took me years before I realized I had a cool shot (my opinion). I don't trash many images. The VW is a slide as well and the rest is all digital. The orange car was shot by accident at 1/15th. The best way to learn in my opinion is testing, practice and think of the light of the moment. I don't use 2nd curtain sync.
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Cactus salesman
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The two pics below I took with an ancient Canon T1i (15mp) and a 18-200 IS lens. I use a lot of zoom as I normally take pics from the stands around the 330 mark for panning shots.

I am upgrading to a Canon 7D (used) and want to know what lens out there will give me the high quality that I am after, as well as being quick. I chose the 7D because of the 8 frames per second, and around 18 shots in RAW before the buffer slows it down, along with the good, quick auto focus. But I am a little confused on what lens I should pic. What lens would you go with for this type of action shooting?

I feel I am getting close but not quite there yet. The images need to be sharper and I need a little bit slower shutter speed.




 

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Troublemaker
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canon 70-200 f2.8L. Either IS or non-IS - there simply is no other option. some folks love IS, some (including me) don't like it. I scored a 1st gen non IS lens from b&h for $1089 about a year ago. they always have them in the used department.
 

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I just don't care for it - I've used it and had a lot of difficulty getting my images to look the way I wanted...felt like it slows down the autofocus quite a bit. my non IS lens kicks ass. I think it's a preference thing - if I were you, I'd rent each one from borrowlenses and shoot with it for a weekend before you make the investment.
 

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I just don't care for it - I've used it and had a lot of difficulty getting my images to look the way I wanted...felt like it slows down the autofocus quite a bit. my non IS lens kicks ass. I think it's a preference thing - if I were you, I'd rent each one from borrowlenses and shoot with it for a weekend before you make the investment.
True statement !!!!
 

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The advantage of IS (Canon) and VR (Nikon) is a bit confusing. The internal mechanism does help with hand held stabilization but behaves differently when panning. With VR on, the Nikon system will refocus if you move more than 10 degrees from horizontal and that is the "bump" you see through the lens when tracking. For this reason, it is usually better to have the VR turned off when panning. There is a "work around" I have used and that is to actually tilt the lens to 20-30 degree from horizontal and pan that way. Of course, the image will be tilted, if that works for you.

From my understanding, the Canon IS has a "horizontal only" mode on their system which is specifically designed when panning. Maybe a Canon user can confirm this as I am not sure.

JMHO - Joe
 

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The advantage of IS (Canon) and VR (Nikon) is a bit confusing. The internal mechanism does help with hand held stabilization but behaves differently when panning. With VR on, the Nikon system will refocus if you move more than 10 degrees from horizontal and that is the "bump" you see through the lens when tracking. For this reason, it is usually better to have the VR turned off when panning. There is a "work around" I have used and that is to actually tilt the lens to 20-30 degree from horizontal and pan that way. Of course, the image will be tilted, if that works for you.

From my understanding, the Canon IS has a "horizontal only" mode on their system which is specifically designed when panning. Maybe a Canon user can confirm this as I am not sure.

JMHO - Joe
All the newer Canon lenses, even the old 100-400 have mode 1 and mode 2. Mode 2 is for panning. The lenses can sense if you are taking a picture of a still object though. Therefore if you leave it in mode 2, it will act like it is in mode 1 if you are taking a still shot, the second it starts to move horizontal it switches itself to mode 2. This is why every lens I have is always in mode 2. It will decide for itself what I am shooting.
 
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