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I have a set of Custom Made AVO Single Adjustable shocks on my Dodge. They were made specifically for my Mopar J-Body. They are Stud - Stud mount style. How can I tell if these are bad? I adjust them tight and they are hard. I turn them soft and they are easy to move. They appear to me to work just fine, but how can I really tell?

Thanks, Bubba
 

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sounds like they are working based on your hand dyno... but the only way to know would be to send them to somebody with a shock dyno!
 

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you really need to dyno a shock BEFORE you put it on, Then dyno it at the end of the season.

If you travel alot, they are likely whipped. Trailering beats the ever living dogshit out of them. Racing doesnt bother them at all.
 

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If you travel alot, they are likely whipped. Trailering beats the ever living dogshit out of them. Racing doesnt bother them at all.
?? explain that one!! that makes no sense at all...
 

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?? explain that one!! that makes no sense at all...
Have you ever gotten inside an enclosed trailer to sneak into the track?.......Well ...neither have I but I heard it is rough as hell in there. Bounces you around like a friggin ping pong ball.....That's what I heard anyway. :cool:
 

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Have you ever gotten inside an enclosed trailer to sneak into the track?.......Well ...neither have I but I heard it is rough as hell in there. Bounces you around like a friggin ping pong ball.....That's what I heard anyway. :cool:
I've never been iside one either, but I have a drip pan under the front end of the car that was beat to hell from the headers smacking it after a trip to the track. A rough ride in there for sure.
 

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Unless your trailer is air ride, its gonna transmit some of the bounce to your car. Even the torque tube triple axle trailers are rough inside. There are no shocks on your trailer. The car is constantly bouncing up and down for as long as you drive. That builds heat in the shock from the resistance. The heat eventually breaks the oil down.

Strapping the car down by the frame isnt always the best solution either. The race car chassis becomes the "upper cord of a truss" then. Your trailer flexes as it moves down the road. Strapping it down by the chassis effectively bridges the flex, and transmits it to your frame. The best way is to strap it to air bags, so the bags carry the load.
 

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That builds heat in the shock from the resistance. The heat eventually breaks the oil down.
riding around in a trailer won't hurt a shock!! if they do... they were junk anyway...replace them with something good!!
 

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Work a shock for 3 hours bouncing down the road, and see if it isnt warm. Once is hits 140 degrees, the shock oil molecules begin to shear. Remember that inside the trailer, the air can not cool the shock to disipate any heat.

Has ZERO to do with shock quality.

Its the stiffness of the valving and the type of oil used, that generates the heat. Remember that these shocks are designed only for 10 seconds of motion.
 

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140degrees isnt near enough temp to hurt a shock!! what if you build a shock using fluid that doesnt have molecules to break down?? does that mean the shock is bad from the start??
it has 100% to do with the quality!!
if they are seeing 140 degrees riding around in a trailer... big deal... if they are seeing 300degrees then you have an issue... buy a new trailer!! lol
 

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bad shocks

If you need an example of what your shocks go thru, drive down the freeway some time and look for an open car hauler that is hauling brand new cars & trucks of any make and model, then drive up just behind them in one lane over and watch what each vehicles does as it travels down the road, now, imagine your car there:eek::eek:

Many articles have been written to explain the best way to trailer a vehicle down the road, and to make both the trailer , and vehicle as ONE is the key to shock life extension. Some say the best is to install wood between the frame and floor and tighten down the vehicle until it has no movement, but have good tie downs, and the other is to criss-cross each tie down in the front and rear as to limit side to side & up and down movement to as little as possible.

Good luck, and I loved that hand dyno test jerry 2866:supz::supz::supz:
 
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