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Discussion Starter #1
I've been doing the research, but my wife said "ask the 'Bullet, they know everything".... Refinishing about 2000 sq. ft. of red oak hardwood in my house, natural color, no stain. Which is better/easier to use, oil based or water based polyurethane? I've read pros and cons on each. Thanks in advance.
 

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I refinished my floors in 1995 and used oil based material from Home Depot, after a few years it looked terrible, scratched easy, turned orange. I refinished them again in 2001 and this time used water based material from a professional hard wood flooring supplier. I used the water based stuff because a professional hard wood floor guy told me to. This stuff wears like iron, never oranged and was like a $100 a gallon, I also used the same stuff in one of my rental houses. I think it was called Bono??
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I refinished my floors in 1995 and used oil based material from Home Depot, after a few years it looked terrible, scratched easy, turned orange. I refinished them again in 2001 and this time used water based material from a professional hard wood flooring supplier. I used the water based stuff because a professional hard wood floor guy told me to. This stuff wears like iron, never oranged and was like a $100 a gallon, I also used the same stuff in one of my rental houses. I think it was called Bono??
I looked at the Bono, and read a lot of good reviews. Thanks for the input.
 

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I primarily use waterbase finish. Not a fan of Bona though, there are much better finishes out there. They are both similar to work with and either can be applied the same way. I use waterbase because of the lower V.O.C.s, dry time, odor, and ease of cleaning after completion. Your floor will fade over time regardless of what you put on it. The oil modified stuff will 'amber' and the waterbase will 'frost' but, I have seen waterbase 'yellow' too (hope that makes sense). Alot of finish failures I have seen are not because of poor performance from the finish but because of improper grit sequence when sanding and neglect to clean after. If you have any questions pm me and I will do my best to help you out. I think either way you will be happy with whatever you put down though.
 

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Thank you for the reply. I am sanding using 36-60-100 on the drum sander and edger, is that sufficient? Then vacuum and wipe down with tack rag before applying. What poly's do you use/reccomend? If using a water base, do I need to use a sealer first? Sand in between coats? And lastly, apply with roller or lambswool pad?
Sent pm, but figured I would post it here also.
 

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Guy up north used the same stuff that goes on NBA courts. Was over 500 bux a pail. Looks like glass. Can't remember the brand though.
 

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Had my floors done and the guy used water base finish. Each finish took 1 hour to dry, he put on 3 coats and 10 years later still looks good, water base is the way to go good luck.
 

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Synteco is the best, water based is the way to go, poly based finishes are for cabinets and millwork,not floors. Make sure to turn off all pilot lights and NO SMOKING anywhere around.
 

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Guy up north used the same stuff that goes on NBA courts. Was over 500 bux a pail. Looks like glass. Can't remember the brand though.
I'm not really interested in the "high gloss" basketball court look. Most likely will be using satin.
 

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Use the drum first then the edger, the drum tends to leave a ramp when pulling back.....
 

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Will do. Just bought an American Clark Drum sander last week. Buying an edger sometime this week
Do your self a favor and fine a local Hardwood flooring supply house and buy Commercial grade oil base poly, everything you buy from a box store will not last. I own a Flooring company and we use both oil and water based products. Over oak oil is nicer and will last a long time if it's done right. Waterbase I use only if the customer wants it or it's going over a wood like Maple,Ash,Hickory or Brazilian Cherry. Good luck with your flooring project.
Mark
 

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We used water based on our oak floors in our fireplace showroom and they came out great and the coats went down in no time....

Fast forward three years and we will be sanding and putting down an oil finish. The water based poly will not hold up to the kind of traffic we have.

If it were my home I would concider using the water based again, but not in a high traffic area.
 

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We build custom homes at the beach. Our floor guy uses a product called StreetShoe. It is water based and used on a lot of professional gym floors.
 
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