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Have a wilson crossbar plate which has 2 lines for nitrous and 2 for fuel with only one solenoid each, have 65 all the way around the plate was wondering what jet do I need to have in the flow meter when flowing it to check that properly
 

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I may stand corrected, however, I believe Wilson recommends to flow with the same size jet your using in the plate. Check with them first to be sure. 9547716216 wilsonmanifold.com
 

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I kill parts
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^ if you do it that way, anytime you jet up or down you'll also be increasing or decreasing the pressure(respectively). Changing pill size and pressure together will make a much larger swing in the end effect.
 

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TRUE STREET #441
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Wilson recommends that but, when I ran there plate I flowed it through a 73 jet. I started with 6#s and made a 330 pass and checked the plugs. If you run the tunes like they want, You are going to get yourself in trouble. JMHO
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yea I used a 73 this past weekend when I flowed it... But was just wanting to make sure that was correct. Thanks
 

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when you do the flow test, do you put the jet before or after the solinoid and dos the solinoid have to be on and activated for the fuel to run through?:confused:
 

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Trevor Stripling
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It really does not matter what jet you use, that is within reason, that is if the fuel supply and regulator are adequate for the application. Put a 73 or 83 and the pressure will be the same. Why? Because you have a pressure regulator and it's job is to regulate the pressure. If you set it a 6 psi it will regulate to that pressure no matter what jet you have on the flow tool. I know someone is going to post on here that if you open the end of the fuel line and free flow it that it won't maintain 6 psi, and yes you will be correct, but that is only because the fuel supply and regulator are not adequate for that application and will not be able to control the pressure.

Trevor
 

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TRUE STREET #441
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Strych, I didn't feel like you were correct, so I did a test of my own. I have a brand new SJ Flow tool and I flowed my system with the 73 jet and it was set @ 6#s and it still flowed 6 #s today. I then changed to a .057 jet and it flowed @6.1 pounds, then I went to a .087 jet and it flowed 5.8#s. I went back to the .073 jet and again it flowed 6.0 pounds.
Mattke, If I have learned anyt hing from Steve, It's take baby steps and read your plugs. RC
 

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I kill parts
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It really does not matter what jet you use, that is within reason, that is if the fuel supply and regulator are adequate for the application. Put a 73 or 83 and the pressure will be the same. Why? Because you have a pressure regulator and it's job is to regulate the pressure. If you set it a 6 psi it will regulate to that pressure no matter what jet you have on the flow tool. I know someone is going to post on here that if you open the end of the fuel line and free flow it that it won't maintain 6 psi, and yes you will be correct, but that is only because the fuel supply and regulator are not adequate for that application and will not be able to control the pressure.

Trevor
From a fluid dynamics aspect I do agree with this. At the same time, I have seen results posted similiar to what HEADSUP just posted and I have one simple solution.

Just flow it with the same jet everytime, that way you maintain and even base-line in which to tune off of. If you want to be able to compare your #'s w/ others, then use the "standardized" .073.
 

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Horsepower and Hops
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From a fluid dynamics aspect I do agree with this. At the same time, I have seen results posted similiar to what HEADSUP just posted and I have one simple solution.

Just flow it with the same jet everytime, that way you maintain and even base-line in which to tune off of. If you want to be able to compare your #'s w/ others, then use the "standardized" .073.
This^^^^ keep it consistant and tune from there.
 

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Trevor Stripling
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It should not matter. He was within. .3 lbs. That is common just turning on and off the pump. It is not dynamics that is way beyond this it is regulated pressure. That is why we put the regulator. If not why do we need it. If the pump can supply and the regulator can regulate, the pressure will always be the same no matter what restrictor.

If not then you should flow with the exact restriction as to be used in real time.

Trevor
 

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Strych, I didn't feel like you were correct, so I did a test of my own. I have a brand new SJ Flow tool and I flowed my system with the 73 jet and it was set @ 6#s and it still flowed 6 #s today. I then changed to a .057 jet and it flowed @6.1 pounds, then I went to a .087 jet and it flowed 5.8#s. I went back to the .073 jet and again it flowed 6.0 pounds.
Mattke, If I have learned anyt hing from Steve, It's take baby steps and read your plugs. RC

Rodney,
Your findings are correct as you tested. As you make the flow jet larger, you create less restriction in flow after the reg, equaling a lower pressure reading. Make the flow jet smaller, creates more restriction to flow and increases pressure. From my testing if I recall correctly 20 numbers either ways is about .2 to .3 in PSI. SJ
 

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It should not matter. He was within. .3 lbs. That is common just turning on and off the pump. It is not dynamics that is way beyond this it is regulated pressure. That is why we put the regulator. If not why do we need it. If the pump can supply and the regulator can regulate, the pressure will always be the same no matter what restrictor.

If not then you should flow with the exact restriction as to be used in real time.

Trevor
I think most guys put the flow tool at the end of the line going to the solenoid. The pressure in the regulator is going to be higher than the pressure at the solenoid when fuel is flowing. How much higher depends on how much flow. Obviously, it should be a small difference, as demonstrated by HEADSUP.
 

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Trevor Stripling
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Rodney,
Your findings are correct as you tested. As you make the flow jet larger, you create less restriction in flow after the reg, equaling a lower pressure reading. Make the flow jet smaller, creates more restriction to flow and increases pressure. From my testing if I recall correctly 20 numbers either ways is about .2 to .3 in PSI. SJ
Please explain to me why do you use a regulator?

Trevor
 

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Fuel pressure is simply an indication of the amount of restriction in the fuel system. Actually, isn't the regulator truely regulating the pressure from the fuel pump and keeping that side of the line constant pressure(between pump and regulator)? The pressure after the regulator is a result of whatever restriction is in the line IE whatever jet is in there.
 
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