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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have always cleaned a bare block after final honing with hot water and TIDE powdered soap. ( I spray the entire block down with GUNK engine cleaner before the wash and let it set for a while.) Pressure wash down with the water/TIDE with air assisted sprayer. Use bristle brushes for bores, galleys lifters, hand wipe green surface conditioning material in bores to help float out honing debris. Quickly blow dry and coat with WD 40.

My machine shop guy says he never puts water on block after honing. Says he does not want any corrosion starting on the cylinders after honing.

He uses trans fluid on the cylinder bores and wipes with rags until they show no more dirt, then puts block in a home made rinse tank with a parts washing pump and hose with brush on end. The pump has a filter before it to take out fines. He then flushes everything with mineral spirits for an extended time.

So what are you doing to get cylinder bores clean after honing and to clean rest of block the last time before assembly?
 

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I use a similar method to yours except I don't like to spray the entire block with WD because anything floating around in the air will stick to the oil. I just spray the cylinders & deck surfaces after blow drying the entire block, then wipe down the cylinders to remove the fine surface rust & respray them. I wipe the lifter bores with a rubber-gloved finger coated in oil. Then all of the surfaces that were oil coated, I clean with a lint-free rag with brake cleaner before final assembly. I don't think the tiny amount of surface rust that accumulates while you are drying the block hurts the ring seal, it appears to wipe right off after spraying with WD.
 

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wash everything down with varsol using a plastic bristle brush through all the lifter bores and all the oil galleries in the valley and crank case areas. I then use Soapy water (lots of dish soap) and run through the same spots I just washed with varsol. I then hose it all down really good with a garden hose really paying attention to the oil galleries. While its still wet I spray the block down with a shit load of WD-40. I spray that shit every where in the lifter bores, oil galleries, cylinders..... every where that is wet. Then I blow the shit out of it with an air hose to get the rest of the residue off the block.

Spraying WD-40 after hosing it down keeps the rust off the block and forces all the water off the block. Ask anyone that has had water in their distributer what WD-40 does. If you hose it and then blow air on the block to clear the water your gonna causing it to rust
 

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I did one today.

Washed with lacquer thinner and brushes over entire block concentrated on the bores with a toilet brush. Then rag and trans fluid on bores and main saddles.

Then broke out the hose and bucket of soapy water, cleaned everything but bores/saddles. Water hose and brushes through all the oil galleries. Spend 15 minutes drying with compressed air. Wiped out bores real well with clean towels. Fogged some WD40 over everything. Zero rust and clean as a pin.
 

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Not all of us can afford and/or have room for cleaning equipment that an engine block will fit in. I do the driveway hot water with dishwater soap thing myself. First I clean with engine gunk degreaser and hose off. Then I get a 5 gallon bucket (prefilled 2/3 with hot tap water and soap) and use the brushes that get run thru all of the galleys and have a large brush that I do the bores with. The large brush came with a twisted wire shaft (same as used on ball hones) with a little loop on the end. I cut the loop off and put the shaft in a battery powered drill. I dip the brush in the bucket, then stick it in the bores, spin it with the drill and run it up and down like I was honing the cylinders. After the final cleaning and rinse, I just do my best to dry everything with compressed air.

The guy that mentioned spraying it with WD40 while it's still wet has a good point though. You will notice that nothing really starts to rust until you actually blow the water off - this lets air get to the surfaces which starts the rust. Depending on you outside humidity, it can start pretty fast so if you blow it dry first, you want to do it as quickly as possible and immediately start spraying it down with WD40. I also use regular automatic transmission fluid on the cylinder walls instead of WD40. I fold up a paper towel, pour a little over it and wipe the cylinders down real good (I usually finish this process by using my fingers to spread it around to make sure it coats all of the cylinder surfaces). This displaces any water and provides a thick protective coating.

When I am ready to install pistons, I take a white paper towel, wet it with brake cleaner, then wipe the cylinder walls. First wipe will show "color" of stuff you are removing. Repeat with fresh paper towels until you see no more residue on the paper towel.

By the way, all this cleaning is much easier to do if you have an engine stand that rotates. I say this because in the past I use to do all of this without an engine stand - LOL.
 

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Before it goes to the machine shop, I make sure that all plugs are out. Remember the sbc w/ the hard plug in the deck?
And, the 1 down in the bore at the rear?
I had 1 block that had not had these removed. Once in my shop, I noticed them still in place. I removed them, and.....:(
That crap would have been pumped into a fresh set of brgs, rings, etc.
As for the flash rust, I wash, then WD, then blow dry, use lint free rags/atf, to do the walls.
 

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I have a parts washer made from 1/2 55 gallon drum and simple degreaser pump,like60$ and use a solvent called Agitene, to wash block and parts i use a white cotton rag to clean cylinders and brushes for passages and then blow dry with compressed air , and since my garage is heated/ACed block stays that way clean and rust free, i never use water/soap
 

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I wash in my solvent tank. Wipe the cylinders with ZEP lint free towels and lacquer thinner like I'm getting ready to assemble. Coat cylinders with 50 weight oil and go to the car wash. Get back, blow it off, wipe the cylinders again with ZEP towels and lacquer thinner. There is never any metal from honing left in the bore when washing with high pressure hot detergent.
 

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ATF clean the bores until the paper is clean....wash down with hot water directly from heater tank and Dawn detergent...spray down machined surfaces with WD40. Then dry, lacquer thinner clean block surfaces for paint, tape off areas you don't want paint on, paint. More WD40 on machined surfaces/bores. Air blast one last time before installing parts, clean surfaces with Lacquer thinner or Brakeclean. I use brown masking paper for final cylinder bore cleaning, it's lint free and shows the honing dirt really well, it might take 3/4 applications of ATF but ATF is a great cylinder bore cleaning agent.
 

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From SpeedTalk Ed-vancedEngines » Wed Mar 28, 2007 6:59 pm: (I wholeheartedly agree with this and Total Seal's "Quick Seat" is the best thing you can use on a new hone & rings)

Quick Seat: http://www.totalseal.com/tools-lubricants.html

"My current ring cylinder piston lube is not that much lube but enough. Again from suggestions from my ring company. Cylinder wall prep for cleaning and lube;

Clean with Lacquer Thinner using a lint free Blue Paper Shop Towel.

Lightly wipe with WD-40. I stress wipe lightly with WD-40.

Spread Total Seal Quick-Seat with my fingers all over the cylinder wall.

Watch the Quick-Seat for a color change.
If Quick-Seat changes to a black color, wipe cylinder and re-clean. It was not clean enough.

If Quick-Seat turns a greenish gray tint Great! Cylinder is ready. That is the only lube you will need.

Do not get oil on ring surface. You can install piston and rings dry or you can lightly wipe WD-40 only on piston skirts.

Oil on the rings or oil flooding the rings can prevent the ring surface from a complete seating to the cylinder wall.

Mr. Keith Jones at Total Seal has never steered me wrong so I adhere to what his research develops to help me with better ring to cylinderwall seal."
 

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SuperStockA said:
Oil on the rings or oil flooding the rings can prevent the ring surface from a complete seating to the cylinder wall.
Not really. A good oil, one with a lot of ZDDP will cause chemical polishing where there is metal to metal contact. Chemical polishing is > than metal on metal wear.
 

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Greg....Your pulling out an abstract sentence from an entire statement. When using the Total Seal Quick Seat....it is dry rings against the quick seat burnished upon the cylinder walls. If you were to oil the rings against the quick seat you've negated the Quick seat.
 

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Greg....Your pulling out an abstract sentence from an entire statement. When using the Total Seal Quick Seat....it is dry rings against the quick seat burnished upon the cylinder walls. If you were to oil the rings against the quick seat you've negated the Quick seat.

Hey, it's a message board. Not everyone will agree

Another statement I disagree with: "Do not get oil on ring surface. You can install piston and rings dry or you can lightly wipe WD-40 only on piston skirts."

On a round bore and a Total Seal ring there is very little break-in to be done in the first place. Call me old fashioned, but chemical polishing from a good oil with ZDDP works.

I'm not going to trust something that sits in the bottom of the hone to prevent wear on the ring face.
 
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