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I have a new Procharged blow thru motor going together that should be complete mid May, and I would like to put this new set up some type of dyno before taking it to a track. Trying to keep cost somewhat down I most likely will only do one or the other. My questions is “do you prefer engine dyno or chassis dyno for tuning a new setup”?
I would like to hear some input on why one may be more advantages than the other.
Thanks
 

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Personally I like using an Engine dyno. It can be a bit of hasel sometimes but it easier to do lots of things with the motor out of the car. My biggest reason is it gives me true solid torque and HP #s when ordering a torque converter. I dont like guessing when it comes to converters cuz they are such an important part of the setup.
 

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Both have their merits but, BUT, if you're gonna' only do one or the other, pay for the chassis dyno. It's more realistic as to what the engine and drivetrain COMBO' will perform like in your chassis. You have no idea how many times I've met somebody that bought an engine that ,"made 600hp on the (engine) dyno!", and then promptly ran 13's @ 108mph in their 3400lb street car. My only itch is to engine dyno my forthcoming 406 TT project engine and THEN throw the car on the chassis dyno, no reason other reason than seein' what the % of loss is on my application (stick-shifted 3600lb car). Good luck to you, either way!


---==Temio Williams
Yuba City, CA
 

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Engine dyno. I don't put anything on the chassis dyno. The point is to take the car factor out of it to try to tune the engine and it doesn't beat up the car at the same time. Too many variables with chassis dynos, and just like the track, if the car spins the wheels on the dyno rollers, you can throw that run out the window. You want consistency when tuning an engine, and you will only get that on the engine dyno.
As for haveing the power from an engine dyno and promptly running real slow at tha track, that just means someone doesn't know how to set up the rest of the car. As an engine builder, I also set up the rest of the combination for the track, and if you know how to configure a converter and gearing based on weight and tire size, you will be 99% when you go to the track as that is the true test. Once you know power from the engine, and if the car is properly set up, you will see what it is putting to the ground. Just too many variables with chassis dynos to get consistent and accurate readings. You will be alot happier running it on the engine dyno. Not only does it take most of the guess work out to help setup the rest of the car, as it allows you to get real close with the rest of combination. For you to run it on a chassis dyno, you will need to put gears and converter in before it is run, and if they are way off, which you won't have any idea what to run yet, you will be doing it all over again. It also helps the builder to tune the negine as they are not bending over fenders and trying to access belt drives for cam timing and all that, as well as making sure the engine doesn't leak or have any problems BEFORE it goes in the car. And, once the engine is dynoed on an engine dyno, it goes in the car with the rest of the parts needed for the engine to run well, and all you have to do at the track is tune the suspension. Just a much easier and better way of doing it. Just my .02
 

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Both have their merits but, BUT, if you're gonna' only do one or the other, pay for the chassis dyno. It's more realistic as to what the engine and drivetrain COMBO' will perform like in your chassis. You have no idea how many times I've met somebody that bought an engine that ,"made 600hp on the (engine) dyno!", and then promptly ran 13's @ 108mph in their 3400lb street car. My only itch is to engine dyno my forthcoming 406 TT project engine and THEN throw the car on the chassis dyno, no reason other reason than seein' what the % of loss is on my application (stick-shifted 3600lb car). Good luck to you, either way!


---==Temio Williams
Yuba City, CA
Im with Bad Influence on this.


I can agree to a point about the chassis dyno. In my experience the numbers are accurate as long as chassis and drive train are optimal for the setup.
Ive seen motors engine dynoed . Then put in the car with a tight converter for nitrous. Make some pulls on motor on a chassis dyno and it will show way low on power. Just an example of how a tight converter can trick you on a chassis dyno. Yes it still is reflecting what its gonna do at the track but you need the true torque reading of an engine dyno to get the converter as close as possible. Im sure someone will say that they can get the converter right on the chassis dyno. Thats fine but then your doing the converter again.

I too have seen a few 600hp motors way under convetered go 13s.
 

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I WOULD NOT GO TO A CHASSIS DYNO IF IT HAS FREE(I am talking 1200 or more HP)..After leaving Pat Musi engine dyno I ran the 1/4 mile very often for 2 years using my blower with Nitrous and ran alot of 8.70s at 157 in my 3570# Drive everywhere car with NO trouble............Oldhead
 

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i deal with this arguement everyday!! i have had both!! for a few years!! the engine dyno is gone!! sold it!! the chassis dyno has been awesome!! from low 7 second cars, to the daily driver street cars. why not check everything on the vehicle??? i dynoed engines for 10+years, with a 7al2 ignition, and killer fuel system, only to have a goober slap it in a junk car, with a $150.00 converter, $50.00 fuel system, $10.00 hei distributor..and go to the track and make an azz out of himself, and then start blaming everyone that worked on the junk!!! with the chassis dyno, i take all the "IFS... OR BUTS" out!!! if it drives thru the converter?? ....i know it, if it runs out of fuel thru the pull, i know it,...... if the ignition breaks up, i know it,.... i can monitor boost, fuel pressure,air fuel ratio, rpm, etc. because the everyday hotrod does not have a datalogger!!! try and get any of this info from the customer at the track!!! they always have that "deer in the headlights look" after they get back from making a pass!!! i dyno everything from [email protected] wheel to [email protected] wheel...no issues with tire spin either!!!
 

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i deal with this arguement everyday!! i have had both!! for a few years!! the engine dyno is gone!! sold it!! the chassis dyno has been awesome!! from low 7 second cars, to the daily driver street cars. why not check everything on the vehicle??? i dynoed engines for 10+years, with a 7al2 ignition, and killer fuel system, only to have a goober slap it in a junk car, with a $150.00 converter, $50.00 fuel system, $10.00 hei distributor..and go to the track and make an azz out of himself, and then start blaming everyone that worked on the junk!!! with the chassis dyno, i take all the "IFS... OR BUTS" out!!! if it drives thru the converter?? ....i know it, if it runs out of fuel thru the pull, i know it,...... if the ignition breaks up, i know it,.... i can monitor boost, fuel pressure,air fuel ratio, rpm, etc. because the everyday hotrod does not have a datalogger!!! try and get any of this info from the customer at the track!!! they always have that "deer in the headlights look" after they get back from making a pass!!! i dyno everything from [email protected] wheel to [email protected] wheel...no issues with tire spin either!!!
X2 . I have done both ways and both if done correctly are effective. I personally like to be able to tune the combination as it sits in the car. Although you can not simulate G force on either dyno you can see how your fuel system is working , see how your exhaust effects the tune which is not that easy to attach on an engine dyno see if your electronics are working properly in the car. Both work it just what you prefer.
 

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i deal with this arguement everyday!! i have had both!! for a few years!! the engine dyno is gone!! sold it!! the chassis dyno has been awesome!! from low 7 second cars, to the daily driver street cars. why not check everything on the vehicle??? i dynoed engines for 10+years, with a 7al2 ignition, and killer fuel system, only to have a goober slap it in a junk car, with a $150.00 converter, $50.00 fuel system, $10.00 hei distributor..and go to the track and make an azz out of himself, and then start blaming everyone that worked on the junk!!! with the chassis dyno, i take all the "IFS... OR BUTS" out!!! if it drives thru the converter?? ....i know it, if it runs out of fuel thru the pull, i know it,...... if the ignition breaks up, i know it,.... i can monitor boost, fuel pressure,air fuel ratio, rpm, etc. because the everyday hotrod does not have a datalogger!!! try and get any of this info from the customer at the track!!! they always have that "deer in the headlights look" after they get back from making a pass!!! i dyno everything from [email protected] wheel to [email protected] wheel...no issues with tire spin either!!!
Totally agree!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I appreciate hearing about these first hand experiences.

I need to buy a converter, but I've been stalling while making up my mind on which way to go concerning dynos. If it wasn't for that I would have no problem sorting the motor out on a chassis dyno. The converter will be a bolt together so changing the stator to correct the stall won't be a problem, only the money.
 

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Most of the good converter manufacturers can usually get you the correct converter the first time around by answering some questions they ask. I went with a PTC converter and they did not need to know exact dyno numbers to build me the correct converter . PTC and Chance are very good at what they do . Dont let the converter issue sway your decision on which way you go. Plust PTC offers a free adjustment if by chance it is not correct the first time. There is no guarantee that with dyno numbers off an engine dyno you will get the exact correct converter . Lot of other things can affect the way the converter works in the car.
 

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Maybe I am old fashioned, but to me, if you want to find out what it runs in the car, go to the track. That is real world. Engine dynos take alot of the guess work out and good builder will know where to go with a converter and gear with given weights and tire sizes. What does knowing what the car makes at the rear wheels really do if it is not giving you an e/t slip?? The track will also tell you what the engine does in the car. I have seen tons of guys with my engines makes alot of power and then they go to the track without me after skimping on fuel system and gearing and converter and all that fun stuff, they wonder why their 650hp small block pump fuel engine only runs 11's in a 3k lb mustang...According to them, it shouldn't matter, and those are the guys you just can't help cus the guy behind the counter at the local gas n sip's mother's best friend's mailman's dog told him what he should have made for power and how fast it will go and what converter and gear he needs, hell from what I hear, some guys can predict everything so you don't need to dyno OR even run at the track... :rolleyes: lol. You can lead a horse to water, well you know the rest. But when they don't drink, sometimes you just wanna drown them. In anycase, to me, you spend the money on an engine dyno to get the most out of it, then spend money on a chassis dyno for that guy to mess with the tuneup you just spent all day perfecting, fo it to go to the track with their buddy who is a baker but can tune anything and the car doesn't run worth shit...lol. If the builder gives you the power you were after, and then some, then I feel he is owed the chance to voice what he feels should be run for a converter and gear and shift points and tired, and go to the track and run it. And if you have a builder, like myself who goes to the track and will help you learn how to drive it or get into a routine anyway, the car's performance will be there.
 

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exactly the reason i have a chassis dyno!!! they can get their chassis man to go to the track when i am done!!:cool: because i know it will run and perform!!:cool:
 

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either one chassis or engine is all about where you start and where you end up..... we have a chassis dyno and engine dyno and have used both on our race car but use the chassis dyno the most.... if you use it the way it is meant to be used and make every pull the correct way with the same tire and air pressure and tune from that you will be faster...... people who run from chassis dyno to chassis dyno trying to tune are just making a mistake... everyone is different... find one that the staff knows what they are doing and stick with it.... if you find power from the same dyno over and over it will be faster...... i have proven this many times...... david
 

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We won lots of NHRA races and we had to use both to be "prepared"...we did ALL engine development on the DTS engine dyno.

We developed the bike and the bike tune, ignition, EFI, trans, shift lite, air shifter, all systems, V300 data and set up, config files and styles.
We found lube issues...electrical issues, fuel systems, THE wireing, THE plumbing, THE fuel system, THE data gathering, THE exhaust system....on and on and on...on the chassis dyno...unload..HAUL ASS...need both today...IMHO

LUCK favors the "prepared" mind...and the "prepared" machine
 

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We learned more in 6 hours on a chassis dyno than we could have learned in an entire season "trying" to go down the track.
 

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It's good to have a datum point to work with be that a chassis or engine dyno. An engine dyno will tell you everything is good before it is installed in the car and what power it is pushing out. A chassis dyno will set the engine up with your combination and let you have a head start at the track. With 3 runs a day max to try & get info from and no guarantee of good weather a weekend can at the strip can cost £500 ($750) without turning a wheel. I'll be taking my car to a chassis dyno to make sure every run counts.
 

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We learned more in 6 hours on a chassis dyno than we could have learned in an entire season "trying" to go down the track.
EXACTLY!! after a few of the local dyno haters come here and try it.... i cant beat em away with 2 sticks!!!:) they finally learn more in 1 day, then they learned the entire season!! and made progress to boot!!! im glad people are opening up, and trying to learn, instead of listening to the bench racers that never race... and know it all !!!:cool:
 

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I understand everyone's points and preferences. Just that when I get done on an engine dyno, and with data gathered, converter is designed and gear is chosen with a given weight and tire. All that is needed is chassis tuning which depending on the application, doesn't take all that much time at a track rental which is one day at the track. You can't tune a suspension on a chassis dyno since you don't launch on it. Well you can, but it isn't recommended lol. All you are doing is tuning the engine with a given converter and gear and ture, and if anyone of them are off, there is no point in continuing as a different converter and gear will show different results. Atleast you can get almost dead on from an engine dyno..Nothing wrong with using both, and I am not knocking anyone who uses a chassis dyno. The thread is about what we prefer, and the engine dyno is what I prefer, and don't use chassis dyno's for the reasons I have listed as a preference. It won't give me any more info than what I have from the engine dyno and if I want to know what it has at the rear wheels or what the car is actually seeing, I will go by the e/t slip.
George, I do agree with you. Having as much data i very important, especially with class racing where you are looking for every little bit, I just don't see what info you can gain using one after an engine dyno, that will help at the track if you know what to the rest of the ocmbination should be off the engine dyno. Granted, it may not be 100% but with experience should be dam close. There always may be a slight gear change and definitley a converter change to find every ounce and get it down, but that is normal. I don't think anyone is wrong for using a chassis dyno mind you, I just strongly prefer engine dynos and the track, as I am the engine guy for the customer, as well as the suspension tuner and responsible for choosing a converter and gear and am the one who goes to the track to get it all work, as well as helping the driver get into a routine and be consistent.
 
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