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Diamond honing is promoted by one of the equipment manufacturers. They sell the machine shops on the idea it is faster, more efficient and cost less due to longer lasting consumables. I see most machine shops that have been in business for over 10 years, still use regular Sunnen tried and true stones.
 

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FE Ford Specialists
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We use diamonds. Seems that with diamond you can get a good geometry on the bore but need to "chase" the finish. With traditional vitreous stones its easier for you get a good finish but have to "chase" the geometry. Since the engines I build (FE Fords) are pretty crappy for bore geometry with really thin walls I decided to use the diamonds and spend more time using multiple stone grit levels.
 

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Like I said earlier, get it up to operating temp (moderate load), then stand on it. If it isn't going to take it due to excessive tight clearances, it never will, no matter how long it gets ran.
When we dynoed my engine the other week I asked the guy running the dyno about break in he just looked at me...

First pull went to 7800 so I guess that broke it in....
 

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FWIW antique truck guys are adamant that an engine must be put under load for proper break in. When an engine is rebuilt in a hobby truck, they won't run it much after initial fire and warm ups until they can hook a load on the back and pull it miles. The focus is on getting the rings to seat, if the cylinders get glazed the rings will never seat to the walls.
This is with big old heavy rings. I can see new technology narrow rings performing differently.
 

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The dirty little secret about OEM (performance car) break-in procedures on new cars is more about getting the driver accustomed to the car/hp, more so than anything else. Basically they don’t trust the new owner to not wreck the car before they get use to the power and handling..
 

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Shrewd Negotiator
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I think, for a street break in, this is a good approach and No synthetic for the first 2000 miles. View attachment 108468
Why no synthetic? 700hp corvettes get it from the factory and never have an issue. Why would other engines?

Personally, I think it's just done because, much like a lot of stuff in the auto industry, people have done it that way for 50 years and it works so why change it.
 
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