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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This came up in another thread, but thought it deserved a wider audience, as it applies to much more than the scope of that thread. This is a comprehensive post about break in. Ring seal is BIG. Lake Speed from Total Seal is an oil specialist and piston ring guy. Excellent resource.

Break In Oils
Lake Speed at Total Seal goes over the in/outs of break in oils. There's more to it than ZDDP. Some additives are NOT good for break in. They do not recommend a specific brand, but let you know what is GOOD for break in, and what is NOT. They also show a link for test results of a bunch of oils commonly used for break in, as well as specific break in oils. VERY good watch.

This is the link to the oil analysis. Below that is a video showing what oil is good and bad for break in, and below that is a video on proper break in procedure.
Direct pdf (easier to read)


 

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Discussion Starter #3
So with no dyno available whats the best way
Put it in the car and drive with a load on it as soon as possible.

You can start/run an engine on a test stand to make sure it's going to work, and is void of major issues, but don't leave it on there any longer than you have to. Needs to be in the car dong work.
 
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I think, for a street break in, this is a good approach and No synthetic for the first 2000 miles.
Screen Shot 2020-07-17 at 5.01.11 PM.png
 

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Get it up to operating temp, and then beat the shit out of it!
Change and inspect the filter after the warm up and first few romps.
 

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The first place to start your engine breakin is with the proper machining and clearances, along with proper assembly. Having said that, modern ring are coated and much harder than the cyl. wall so I would not think the rings would "wear" like say an old set of cast iron rings, even the old "chrome" coated rings would not wear in and seal if the cyl. walls were not prepared correctly. Straight and round with the correct crosshatch depth and smoothness is what you want for your cly. walls to have proper ring/cly. wall "breakin". If you don't have a oil between your cyl. wall and rings for the rings to "float" on then you are going to "wear" your rings. Modern blueprinted engines the rings are seated/sealed when you fire them up.
 

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Get it up to operating temp, and then beat the shit out of it!
Change and inspect the filter after the warm up and first few romps.
That's what the builder told me to do with my first cleveland, almost 30 years ago, seemed to work good, next 3 were on the dyno but dyno is gone now so wondered what people were doing with these newer style thin rings.
Is it better to start in 1st and go through the gears like a 1/4 mile run or get it into 3rd or 4th to put it under more load?-
 

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Run it up and let it back down. To 3000,, then 4000, then 5000 in second gear. Part throttle at first. Change the oil as soon as you can.
 

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I think, for a street break in, this is a good approach and No synthetic for the first 2000 miles. View attachment 108468
Almost every new car comes off the showroom floor full of synthetic oil. Broke mine in on synthetic,after over 100 low 8 second passes it leaks down less than 2%
 

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Almost every new car comes off the showroom floor full of synthetic oil. Broke mine in on synthetic,after over 100 low 8 second passes it leaks down less than 2%
With decent quality rings and proper cylinder wall prep, ring "break in" should be almost instantaneous, we dyno on a non-synthetic mostly for economics. On rare occasions we have released engines without dyno run in, we fill with synthetic, prime it and send them straight to the track. On these occasions, we tell the customer to change the filter after a couple of practices and have had no issues.

I have known Lake Jr for 20 years, he is a great guy. He is also a salesman, a very good one.
 

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Get it up to operating temp, and then beat the shit out of it!
Change and inspect the filter after the warm up and first few romps.
Back around 1980 ish, I worked at a Oldsmobile Cadillac dealership.
The owner bought 50/75/100?? Oldsmobile V-6 Starfire's from a dealer going out of business.
Original dealer claimed the dealer prep time so, we had to prep them for about nothing....

We HATED those car's and, pretty much beat them silly, like a rental car.
WOT, don't lift to shift.
Those car's ran better than any of the car's the dealer paid us to prep.

Jim
 

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There is no 1 magic break in procedure. Depends how the engine was built. Compare a fresh 0 run time crate LS3 to a blueprinted BBC with racing clearances and perfect honing. That 0 run time assembly line built LS3 is going to have some very tight clearances. And some production variations. Say that thing has some tight valves to valve guides, are you going to want to take that motor to WOT red hot right away? I wouldn't. I'd do some heat cycles with moderate load, Working your way up to full loads. Those things come with super tight pistons to bore, bearing clearances... aluminum bearings - no tri-metal. Now on the other hand - a race prepped and blue printed motor with racing bearings, racing bearing clearances, every valve guide perfect.... can put a few moderate load heat cycles into it to check for leaks, timing, AFR... then right to full load heat cycling it... change oil and filter.

That's my thought on break in - depends on who and how it was built. I've never seen synthetic oil cause a problem. If someone's oil is "too slippery" to get good ring seal... I'd bet it's more of not the greatest hone job. Properly honed and built right, it should break in and have good ring seal quick with those first few times putting load to it. If you can't get the rings to seal, I doubt it was the oil. But use a bottle that says break in oil if it makes you feel better.
 

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So are you saying these tight clearances effectively wear in and loosen up (guides, bearings and bores)?
 

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So are you saying these tight clearances effectively wear in and loosen up (guides, bearings and bores)?
Depends. I wouldn't say that as a blanket statement. But some parts do wear in to each other. Kinda the whole theory to "break in". I'm saying a clearance that is on the real tight side... ie a valve guide, would not be a great idea to take that green engine to red hot. Might gall something that tight. Another example is pistons. Some OE engines the pistons are almost an interference fit, especially with skirt coating. Would it be wise to take a super tight piston red hot WOT right from green... or give it some moderate load for a bit? A blue printed performance engine would be a different story... the builder knows what all the clearances are. That's why I am saying there is no - 1 perfect break in for all. Depends how the engine was built.

It's like oil - what's the best oil? Depends how the engine was built, and the conditions you will be using it for.
 

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Depends. I wouldn't say that as a blanket statement. But some parts do wear in to each other. Kinda the whole theory to "break in". I'm saying a clearance that is on the real tight side... ie a valve guide, would not be a great idea to take that green engine to red hot. Might gall something that tight. Another example is pistons. Some OE engines the pistons are almost an interference fit, especially with skirt coating. Would it be wise to take a super tight piston red hot WOT right from green... or give it some moderate load for a bit? A blue printed performance engine would be a different story... the builder knows what all the clearances are. That's why I am saying there is no - 1 perfect break in for all. Depends how the engine was built.

It's like oil - what's the best oil? Depends how the engine was built, and the conditions you will be using it for.
Like I said earlier, get it up to operating temp (moderate load), then stand on it. If it isn't going to take it due to excessive tight clearances, it never will, no matter how long it gets ran.
 

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One guy on a motorcycle forum bought two identical bikes.Broke one in by the book. The other one went right to the racetrack. The one broke in by the book used more oil and made less horsepower than the one that got beat on early. His theory was,seating the rings as early as possible kept the carbon to a minimum and lead to less leak down.
 
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