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I don't think there's enough room in your car for something that big.






A capacitor's storage potential, or capacitance, is measured in units called farads. A 1-farad capacitor can store one coulomb (coo-lomb) of charge at 1 volt. A coulomb is 6.25e18 (6.25 * 10^18, or 6.25 billion billion) electrons. One amp represents a rate of electron flow of 1 coulomb of electrons per second, so a 1-farad capacitor can hold 1 amp-second of electrons at 1 volt.
A 1-farad capacitor would typically be pretty big. It might be as big as a can of tuna or a 1-liter soda bottle, depending on the voltage it can handle. For this reason, capacitors are typically measured in microfarads (millionths of a farad).
 

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This amp goes to 11.
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Are you thinking of replacing an automotive battery with a capacitor?
 

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Basically that is what the battery in your car does, your alternator does not make straight DC, but pulsating DC, and the battery acts as a capacitor to straighten that pulsating DC to more of a straight DC, if you are worried about weight on a racecar keep the battery but make it a Braile or one like it, these new batteries are so light you could throw it across the room! Dave
 

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SASQUATCH RACE TEAM
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Basically that is what the battery in your car does, your alternator does not make straight DC, but pulsating DC, and the battery acts as a capacitor to straighten that pulsating DC to more of a straight DC, if you are worried about weight on a racecar keep the battery but make it a Braile or one like it, these new batteries are so light you could throw it across the room! Dave
i hate to tell your wrong but. most all modern alternators are strait dc. if you pull one apart there are 6 diodes 3+ and 3-. the battery is there for starting and to supplement power when the load exceeds the alternator output.
 

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Yes, the diodes are there because an alternator makes AC and the diode pack (in the configuration of a Wheatstone Bridge) takes that AC output and makes it DC, but it is pulsating.

That is why straight DC power supplies for equipment are so expensive, some devices cannot handle pulsating DC.

Don't hate to tell me anything, you have earned the right to say whatever you want here with all of your helpfull posts and I can sure be schooled, even at 60, I am just an old heavy equipment operator, but my equipment weighs 830,000#! Dave
 
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