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This is hard to explain..... but I was told somehow a Engine can make a Electronic Charge that can eat through the Block???? You can check this using a volt meter... sticking + lead in the raditor and - Lead to ground... There is a guy that checked his and hes almost getting a full Volt, his was .9 :smt102

Any info. am I just looking at this wrong :confused::confused:
 

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LMAO! How many engine blocks have you seen with holes in them that were produced by electricity and not mechanical carnage?
 

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Or aluminum heads on an iron block. I had a head gasket rust through from just setting for two years in the shop. Only reason I could think of, dissimilar metals corrosion.

 

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anything with water & electricity can cause that.
lots of grounds slows it down.
In the marina it's the worst with all the boats plugged into shore power. Go through lots of anodes there.


:)
 

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Use a sacrifical anode and ground both heads and the block to the chassis. As already stated, the dissimmilar metals create a battery and the damage you see is due to that. If coolant/antifreeze is present and the Ph is on the acidic side then you can hook a voltmeter up and get a good amount of voltage.

I have a sacrificial zinc anode in my radiator and I have a ground going from the chassis to the rad.
 

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i dont know about any of that stuff but i do know my dads car is electrically possessed. every time i touch something on it or lean up against it i get a shock. crazy ass dodge!
 

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A phenomenon known as cavitation occurs with diesel engines. I imagine it could occur with high comp race engines also. I will let this guy explain it.
Cavitation is a localized low pressure zone that forms adjacent to the outer wall of the cylinder. It is caused by by the flexing of the cylinder wall due to the high cylinder pressures experienced in diesel engine ignition. Gasoline engines don't typically get this failure mode due to lower cylinder pressures during ignition. Basically what happens is the cylinder wall quickly expands due to ignition then returns to its original geometry. This expansion of the cylinder wall is more pronounced as you increase the demand for power. Bascially when you increase your demand for power you are pumping more fuel into the cylinder. If you have a turbo charged unit you are also increasing air charge. This increase in fuel and air causes a more violent ignition which further increases cylinder pressures and thus increases the flexing of the cylinder wall. This fast cylinder wall movement causes a low pressure zone to be created in the coolant adjacent to the cylinder wall. When this pressure zone drops below the vapor pressure point (temperature, coolant ratio, and additive dependant) a vapor bubble is formed. When this low pressure zone returns to a high pressure zone, the vapor bubble collapses, causing an implosion, or pitting phenomena on the cylinder wall (like hitting the surface with a microscopic ball peen hammer). If left unchecked, it will eventually eat all the way through the cylinder wall.
 
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