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Discussion Starter #1
Cars.

Cars that were once cars and are now race cars.

Sure, I like the Pro Mods. They are just to neat and too fast not to like.

I don't pay any attention to Top Fuel or Funny Cars. All the T/F's and all the F/C's look exactly the same. If they were all painted flat black and had no decals, even the drivers would not know which is their car. And Pro Stock is not much better.

But I love real cars that have been modified into being race cars.

In the early part of the 1960's (the Golden Years of Drag Racing), almost all the cars (other than dragsters) came off of an assembly line before they were turned into race cars. Even the original Funny Cars were produced on an assembly line. In fact, many well known race cars were still licensed and registered for the street. Although not many actual drag cars were driven on the street, a surprising number had state license plates. Who would have think it?

I was messing around on my website over the weekend and was surprised at how many Super Stockers, Funny Cars, Gassers and Street Roadsters had license plates. Here is just a sample from:

http://georgeklass.net/




























 

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Discussion Starter #2
Here's a few more. It's funny, all the years I've hung out at the drag races, I never took notice of how many all-out race cars in the '60's were also licensed for the street.








Yes, even Stone-Woods & Cook's original Willys coupe was technically street legal (it had mufflers, working lights, a horn and working windshield wipers).


Dyno Don's 409 Chevy...







 

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Oh I thought you where saying you missed me.No worries,I'm coming back.
 

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Hey George,
I feel the same way, all the more reason to dig x275, "most" ODR, and "most" OL 10.5 cars!;)
The problem IMO is the rules are always seen as somewhat of a grey area to guys and or their chassis builders, and they take advantage of it.
This guy gets away with something, and the next guy pushes it a little more and so on.
Scott
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)


Okay, a car like this is most likely a street car that is raced occasionally. I get that, what we would call today a "street/strip car". Most so-called street/strip cars today are really street cars, that MAY visit a drag strip a few times a year. They are definitely not race cars. But most of the cars above are out and out race cars, and yet, look at all the license plates.

I get calls all the time from guys that are looking at which throttle body to purchase, and I ask them, "is your car a street car or a race car?" They tell me they have a street/strip car. I ask them, "How many miles do you drive a year?". They may say, "oh, about 7,000 or 8,000 miles a year." Then I ask them, "how many times to you go to the drags with your car?" The typical response, "four or five times a year." I ask them, "how many times do you go down the track?" Typical response, "four or five times."

So I say, "Okay, you drive your car 7,000 or 8,000 miles on the street and 6 or 7 total miles on the drag strip per year. That is not a street/strip car, that is a street car (that you very rarely race)." I can understand why that car needs a license plate.

But Dyno Don's 409 Chevy or SWC's Willys Gasser?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
People still convert daily drivers into race cars.
Yes, I understand but the truth is that a daily driver is not a race car. A daily driver means that the driver drives his car 365 days a year. I hardly think that anyone drag races on the drag strip 365 days a year.

A general rule of thumb for me is if the car still has an air conditioner, power steering, any emissions equipment and more than one bucket seat, it's not a race car. It may be a "wannabe" race car but that's not the same as a race car, at least for me.

I'm not arguing with you however. I understand all about hopping up a car and doing a little street racing now and then, but again, that does not make the car a race car, does it?
 

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I'm with you! As impressive as the performance is now, the cars just don't seem to have as much character. If it weren't for the headlight and grill wraps I couldn't even guess what a lot of the new cars are supposed to be. Decades of hardcore competition seem to have spawned corporate racing and Generic racecars unfortunately.
 

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Yes, I understand but the truth is that a daily driver is not a race car. A daily driver means that the driver drives his car 365 days a year. I hardly think that anyone drag races on the drag strip 365 days a year.

A general rule of thumb for me is if the car still has an air conditioner, power steering, any emissions equipment and more than one bucket seat, it's not a race car. It may be a "wannabe" race car but that's not the same as a race car, at least for me.

I'm not arguing with you however. I understand all about hopping up a car and doing a little street racing now and then, but again, that does not make the car a race car, does it?
Also not to argue, but to me the rollbar or cage defines a race car. It's something I'm sort of struggling with right now. I can make my car faster and still enjoy it every day as I do now, but if I put in a cage then stuff really changes. I know if I cage the thing my girl will want to take her car instead of mine when we go out, and there's that pesky situation of riding around with a car full of bars and no helmet. Really can't imagine wearing a helmet every day on my way to work. Besides that, there's no non-recreational reason (IMO) to put bars in the car, so to me that's where the definition of street ends and race begins. In other words, my feeling is that if you have any sort of cage, it's a race car. You may drive it on the street and you may drive it every day but it's still built to race.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Also not to argue, but to me the rollbar or cage defines a race car. It's something I'm sort of struggling with right now. I can make my car faster and still enjoy it every day as I do now, but if I put in a cage then stuff really changes. I know if I cage the thing my girl will want to take her car instead of mine when we go out, and there's that pesky situation of riding around with a car full of bars and no helmet. Really can't imagine wearing a helmet every day on my way to work. Besides that, there's no non-recreational reason (IMO) to put bars in the car, so to me that's where the definition of street ends and race begins. In other words, my feeling is that if you have any sort of cage, it's a race car. You may drive it on the street and you may drive it every day but it's still built to race.
True enough...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hey George,
I feel the same way, all the more reason to dig x275, "most" ODR, and "most" OL 10.5 cars!;)
The problem IMO is the rules are always seen as somewhat of a grey area to guys and or their chassis builders, and they take advantage of it.
This guy gets away with something, and the next guy pushes it a little more and so on.
Scott
Anyone that races in any kind of heads-up class knows exactly what you are describing, and would agree with you. On the other hand, bracket racing (dial-in racing) or Index racing does not require the constant push to go quicker of faster.

I'm a "door car" guy. Despite the fact that I was a 1/3rd owner of a top fuel dragster, I always loved cars with doors. Which is what happens when you grow up playing with a S/S car, then a Funny Car, and of course, Gassers. A car with doors is a car. A car without doors is not for me. When Dyno Don Nicholson received his "Flip-Top", tube frame Comet, I stopped being interested in Funny Cars.
 

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Im with you GK, I like the spectacle of a pro mod etc, but the morphed ,stretched out plastic body shit does nothing for me. May change my mind (a bit) if someone could make a Daytona or Superbird run good LOL.
Good pics above Sir, thanks.
 

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Me too George.
All the kids today have dragsters.
I guess that's a result of the Jr. Dragster program?
 

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I agree George.

I was out at the track this past Saturday. A new Camaro ran into the 10's and was a real street car.
I'm building a 67 steel Chevelle to try to run into the 6's. If I was keeping up with the current plastic cars, cost would have been a lot less, and likely finished a few years ago. I like the real cars too.
Did you get your Baracuda out to race this year?
 

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George, do you think maybe that one of the requirements of some of the classes back in the day was the car had to be somewhat ''streetable'' and this is the reason for the plates ? I know many of cars of the day were driven to the track and raced, but some were trailered too.
 

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They are definitely not race cars. But most of the cars above are out and out race cars, and yet, look at all the license plates.
The red 29A S/R leading your first post belonged to Dean Lowe, and was indeed an often driven street car, as well as a national event winner, so that explains that one. Other cars like Nicholson's surely weren't driven, perhaps maybe the tags were just left on from when the car was new, and they looked odd having a tag bracket without the tag?

This is also the tow bar era. Many of those cars are trailered, but may have been flat towed also once in a while for something. Having a license on may have been a necessity to get insurance on it for liability, and maybe collision/fire/theft etc. I know I have a damn hard time getting something insured that isn't ready to drive.
 

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George, do you think maybe that one of the requirements of some of the classes back in the day was the car had to be somewhat ''streetable'' and this is the reason for the plates ? I know many of cars of the day were driven to the track and raced, but some were trailered too.
I think for the majority, the plates are on the race cars because they once were street cars and driven on the street. They built race cars out of regular street cars, not out of tubing and carbon fiber. I'm not knocking tube chassis cars with plastic bodies, I just prefer race cars that were modified from street cars...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I think for the majority, the plates are on the race cars because they once were street cars and driven on the street. They built race cars out of regular street cars, not out of tubing and carbon fiber. I'm not knocking tube chassis cars with plastic bodies, I just prefer race cars that were modified from street cars...
What he said.
 

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both ....
 
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