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Spiritual Gynocologist
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fuel injection apportions fuel based on the amount of air ingested by the engine. The amount that can be ingested is reduced by a dirty air filter, therefore, so is the amount of fuel that will be supplied.

Obama 0 Logic & Reason 1
 

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A. K. A. Maddox
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947 Posts
Well sort of! The adjustability of the e.c.u.(fuel trim) is not
infinite. It can only compensate so much one way or the other
(rich-lean).
 

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Or you go further on the throttle, because the car isn't making power at low throttle angles with a plugged air filter, thus going open loop to a presumably richer table... it would use more fuel
 

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Spiritual Gynocologist
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80,189 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This is from the LA Times:

Change your air filter

The test team at Consumer Reports was sure that a car would get better mileage with a clean rather than a dirty air filter.

“It stands to reason that if the air is allowed to flow freely, it would result in better fuel economy,” spokesman Douglas Love said.

To do the test, the team used duct tape to partially cover the air intake, simulating a dirty filter. And the result?

“We were surprised to find out it didn’t much matter,” Love said. “The mileage was about the same.”

So, testers added a bit more tape and then some more. Short of blocking off all the air, they got the same results.

“We found that the onboard computers that adjust the fuel mixtures on recent cars did a surprisingly effective job,” he said.

The auto club ran a test with clean and dirty fuel filters on several different cars. Results were similar.

“There was even one test where the mileage got a little bit better – maybe 1% or 2% – with the dirty filter,” Mazor said.

But before you count the money you can save in air filters, there is a price to pay.

“The trade-off was that carbon monoxide emissions went up,” he said.
 
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