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YB Monster Crew
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Going to be buying a house... Everything is perfect on this house except two things...

The basement floor has 9x9inch tile that has tested positive for Asbestos... And the 2nd floor has some of that same tile that used in the basement upstairs...

This house was built in 1960... Original owners to the house...

Is Asbestos removal exspensive? What figures am I looking at here? Can I do this by myself if I wear a real good respirator?

I'm totally lost here and have no clue on what to do or how to handle this...
 

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The problem is getting rid of it once you take it up . My parents house had it , the house flooded from a broken pipe while on vacation . Not sure what it cost because insurance paid for the removal , they called in an abatement company .
 

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Asbestos removal is VERY expensive. RUN!
 

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Vendor
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You could put new underlayment over it and put new floor over that. I wouldn't trust just a respirator of any sort because that might protect you but the fibers on your clothes and then in your families wash will still be there. All it takes is 1 fiber of that stuff to cause a problem. Asbestos abatement is very expensive as is the disposal. Do a google search on it and see what it says. You could tear it up and try not to break it all up so it doesn't become friable and blow around. Maybe use a mist of water to keep it down and then put it in trash bags like a lot of people do and just throw it out. I don't condone this BTW but it has been done. If it was me and you were going to stay there for a long time and not worried about having to disclose this to a new buyer who feels like you do now in the future just cover over it.
 

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If it is more than 3 sq ft you need a professional by Federal law. Doing it yourself can lead to big trouble if they catch on to it or you sell later and you get "discovered". Have the current homeowner deal with it as a prerequisite for the the sale would be my recommendation.
 

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I see that shit in houses all the time. Had it in the last 3 places I lived in and my current house built in 65. I was told as long as it's encapsulated, you're fine. I put some stick down tile over a 1/4 glued and screwed luan plywood layer in the kitchen.

That stuff is OK as long as you don't grind or drill it. If you want it removed, call an abatement company and get a quote.
Working for the phone company, we get yearly training on how to deal with asbestos tile and siding.
 

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YB Monster Crew
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Discussion Starter #10
I'm not walking away from this house... I'm already getting it for a steal and if I have to spend a few bucks to remove the tile I will... Other then the tile... There is nothing wrong with the house...
 

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Going to be buying a house... Everything is perfect on this house except two things...

The basement floor has 9x9inch tile that has tested positive for Asbestos... And the 2nd floor has some of that same tile that used in the basement upstairs...

This house was built in 1960... Original owners to the house...

Is Asbestos removal exspensive? What figures am I looking at here? Can I do this by myself if I wear a real good respirator?

I'm totally lost here and have no clue on what to do or how to handle this...
You can cover it up. 2/3 inches of concrete will do the job!
 

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Senior Moment
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Yup they make a big deal out of it, and it costs big $$$.

The best way around it is wet it down real good, remove it, then midnight run it.

It's too late for this house due to being reported,,,TLW
 

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RAKER
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I saw asbestos removal the other day on holmes on homes and man that looked like a nightmare. They had to wear whole suits, remove everything from the basement, and then tape off every single wall and opening with paper and tape before they could begin the removal process.
 

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The only time it puts off the toxic dust is if it is disturbed and it could be in the mastic that was used to install. Make the seller do clean-up or isolate these areas(plastic temporary walls Tyvec suit and GOOD resperator)and remove and take it to the dump. Don't tell what ya got. I have seen asbestos material taken to landfill.

Set it out for the trash guy a little at a time(double bagged).
 

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YB Monster Crew
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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for everything guys...

Think I'm going to call around and get some quotes... And see what I'm dealing with number wise...



My thing is I'm buying this house and not moving out of it anytime soon... Probally never... And I don't want this in the house period... Even if I spend 5k-10k to remove it... Then so be it...
 

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Easiest way to get rid of the issue is to glue down a felt barrier pad and top with any good underlayment. You can stain, polish, or lay new tile right down over the underlayment.

If you do choose to get rid of the tile, I can tell you from past experience in asbestos abatement using air meters in negative air environments that the actual tile removal produces little to no asbestos fibers. It's the removal of the mastic underneath that can be an issue.

If you would like to tackle it yourself it's very easy, but just remember that it is not legal to do that. Supposed to be removed by a licensed asbestos abatement contractor.

Most all 9x9 tile is asbestos, when I would do removal of that nature we would wet the floor and had a large riding machine that got underneath and lifted the tile off the floor. It is important that negative air machine be used, areas with tile be cordoned off with plastic sheeting, and respirators be worn. Tyvek suits should also be used and disposed of after using. You can also use a propane torch to heat the tile and will it lift right off like you are flipping a pancake. Thus, not fracturing it at all.

When all the tile has been removed, wet down the area with a good odorless or low odor mastic remover. Let it sit to activate, then just use a wet vac to pick it up. This material will be considered hazardous and cannot be disposed of in a regular landfill.

If you have a Class 1 landfill close by, you can drum it up and add sawdust to make it a solid. Then, it can be disposed of in that manner. The tile can be disposed of the same way since it is already a solid.

Like I said though, this is not legal.
 

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