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Unoffical YB Fundraiser
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Well my daughter is a jr and we are starting to look at colleges. Hopefully we will be able to secure a scholarship for some of her tuition, she has a 3.9 GPA and is in the top 50 out of 450 in her grade. Obviously her SAT score will determine the amount of funding the college will give her. Is there any tips or tricks that you might know to secure a grant to help cover the cost of college. She is undecided right now but she will be entering the medical field as a pediatrician, or as a forensic scientist. We attended a college night at her high school last week and luckily I think I have her talked into a small state college and tuition costs are under 20 grand a year, but she really liked another school and that is right about 60 grand a year. That decision will be made in the spring when we visit both schools.
Any help or ideas ?
Thanks,
 

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^^^ FAFSA is a must. Her high school will probably have a night-time instructional meeting on it sometime in Dec. or Jan. of her senior year. You'll need to get it completed by early March, if not sooner.

Next: Get her INVOLVED in other things, if she isn't already!!!! Band; chorus; theater; Key Club; Student Council; the various leadership programs; 4-H or FFA; community outreach programs; also, to an extent, sports (school, intramural, traveling, and community are all valid; also, activities like equestrian competition, participation in scuba/kayaking, etc.) Religion-based charitable programs work, too....food banks, etc. Charities- Red Cross; Race For The Cure...

Most (not all) scholarships and grant programs look at the whole kid, not just grades/SAT/ACT. They want to see varied interests and activities, well-rounded kids, who can become leaders and focal points. I can't emphasize this enough. If she is in band, for example, get her to try out for IHSA (that's what my state calls it, yours will be different); that is a statewide band/vocal contest with different categories for instruments and styles. Just going to IHSA, even if you don't go on to district or state recognition, shows that the child is willing to make some extra effort and learns to work with others.

The best way to think about this is that she is applying for a job, rather than scholarships. Most of the time they are looking for the applicant who offers the largest amount of "skill".

One example I can give here is the daughter of some friends: she was the H.S. valedictorian. Straight 4.0, 31 ACT. No outside interests; no school activities other than band.

We have a local small-town scholarship (town of 6000) that gives one "free-ride" per year: four years of full tuition/room & board/books, paid in full. No real restrictions on where you go, Ivy League OK. This girl applied for it, and lost to a girl with with a 3.5 & 29 ACT....and band, Key Club, volleyball, etc., etc.

Second: look at unusual things your daughter may have done...there are various little scholarships for all sorts of things. My daughter plays the oboe, which is considered rather difficult to learn; she's already been told that she will probably get a $500 scholarship for it, and there's a reasonable chance she may get a partial tuition credit, depending on where she goes to school. Every little bit helps.

Even if your daughter doesn't have many activities yet, she still has slightly over a year and a half to do some things.
 

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Unoffical YB Fundraiser
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks......Will look into http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/

As far as activities with her work load (being in all a.p classes) there is not much time for them.
She is involved with the stage crew for the school (third year), and participates in an after school math program called mathletes.
She did play softball all of her pre h.s years, she went to a softball camp before her freshman year and decided it was to clicky for her.
She also was in the girl scouts for years, then leaving as a scout and returning as a leader for 3 years before the group folded in the area for lack of participation. I dont know what else she could do, but I will sit down and ask if there is a club or group that she would like to join. The rep from the small state college said this is the year they will look at when they make there decision on scholarships.....so I better get on that asap.
Thanks for the help
 

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Contact her guidance counselors at her school. They will have some advice for you.
Contact the financial aid office at the prospective schools. They have lots of advice and directories for scholarships and grants.
Research grants and scholarships online, or at libraries. Go to your local library, or the nearest college library, and ask a librarian for a database for scholarships. Librarians know how the information will be organized, and how to access it.

Beyond that, it's just research and application. There are a lot of online "services," but they charge money. Stay away from them.
 

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Try for on campus work scholarships where she chooses to go. Mine paid for all tuition and was only 4 hrs a week to work. Just had to maintain a 3.0.
 

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As far as activities with her work load (being in all a.p classes) there is not much time for them.
She is involved with the stage crew for the school (third year), and participates in an after school math program called mathletes.
She did play softball all of her pre h.s years, she went to a softball camp before her freshman year and decided it was to clicky for her.
She also was in the girl scouts for years, then leaving as a scout and returning as a leader for 3 years before the group folded in the area for lack of participation. I dont know what else she could do, but I will sit down and ask if there is a club or group that she would like to join. The rep from the small state college said this is the year they will look at when they make there decision on scholarships.....so I better get on that asap.
Thanks for the help
At the risk of sounding like a prick...these kids who are trying for the scholarships are taking A.P. classes too. Believe me, I know it sucks..hours of homework and study...sometimes not much of a social life with all the activities.

She might look into Key Club. They usually do not require tons of time every week and do local charity.

In our high schools there are a couple of "Future Leaders" type of programs that don't take much time up. There's also Campus Life which takes about an hour-90 min. per week.

Volunteering to help with the local Race For The Cure marathon usually only takes a half-day or so and also shows community service. Even reading to kids at the library on Sat. morning once a month helps.

The Mathletes is good...also maybe Scholastic Bowl if it's available. The Girl Scouts experience is perfect.

By stage crew I assume you are talking about theater and musicals...also good stuff. Working with others as a team.

Again, she's basically writing a resume. They like to see leadership roles, and individuals who are self-motivated (like, say, volunteering for things like reading programs).

One thing I forgot to mention is that she might want to consider minoring in something that is very specialized; there often are little pockets of money that goes unspent because there are no candidates. For example, majoring in mech. engineering means that you have a lot of fellow majors; but, minoring in a specialty such as metallurgical engineering means that there may be as few as 5-6 fellow students....and funds to spare. :p
 

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fafsa is a good way to find them, if your in a relatively small town local scholarships help out a lot. I recieved 3 or four from various groups such as kiwanis, and other small groups. I know Arkansas has a lottery scholarship, and it helps me out a ton. Grants such as Pell will also be a big help. If she's good she can pull enough to where they pay her to go to school. I am in a local community college, I am 18, work in their work study program, and every semester I get two $2,400 checks. I'm getting paid to go to college, and as long as the school isnt through the roof she should be able to do the same. The money i get every semester goes into an account and hopefully after I get my associates the money should be enough to pay my way through my bachelors degree.
 
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