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BYE-BYE RACING
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Yes or no what do thay help with ?
 

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BYE-BYE RACING
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Carburetor Spacers

Carburetor Spacers:

Carburetors spacers can be a very useful tuning aid when working on your streetcar, or racecar. A spacer can be used to move the torque and power-band where it is more usable in your application, or they can be used to help work out inefficiencies in your combination.

4-Hole Spacers. As a rule of thumb a 4-hole designed spacer (4 individual holes one under each barrel of your carburetor) will increase your throttle response, and acceleration. They can also move the torque and power-band down in the RPM range. This is accomplished by keeping the air and fuel flowing in more of a column, which increases the air velocity. This can be a perfect addition if your vehicles throttle response is not as good as you’d like, or you’re getting passed when you pick up the throttle coming off of the corning. A 4-hole spacer can also help make up for something in the intake tract being larger than optimal (too large of a carburetor, cam, intake, etc.)

Open Spacers. As a rule of thumb an open designed spacer (1 big hole underneath your carburetor) will decrease your throttle response, and acceleration. They can also move the torque and power-band up in the RPM range. This is accomplished by increasing the plenum area, which will help in the higher RPM’s. This can be a perfect addition if your vehicle has traction problems when accelerating, or coming off of the corner. A 4-hole spacer can also help make up for something in the intake tract being smaller than optimal (too small of a carburetor, cam, intake, etc.)

Combination Spacers. A combination spacer (half 4-hole, and half open) can give you the best of both worlds. Increasing your throttle response, and acceleration over not using a spacer, and increasing or broadening the torque and power-band.

Plenum Dividers. A Plenum divider does as the name implies divides the plenum in an open plenum intake manifold from side to side. These are generally used to help prevent fuel slosh from side to side in high G load Oval-Track, or Road-Race applications. It is common on certain engines to have lean cylinders do to fuel slosh. A SBC oval track engine running on methanol can run lean on cylinders 3 & 5 while cylinders 4 & 6 will run rich. A plenum divider can help eliminate this.

Spacer thickness. Varying the thickness of your spacer will affect how it affects your engine. Normally the thicker the spacer the more of an affect if will have on your combination. Meaning if a ½” thick spacer helps you a little a 2” thick spacer can give you more of the same affect.

Spacer Material. There are many different types of materials used for manufacturing spacers. They all have pro’s and con’s. Wood for example is a great material as far as thermo efficiency, but can wick fuel, which is not safe. Plastic, or composite spacers are also very good at not transferring heat, but are not as strong, and can be harder to modify. Generally Phenolic fiber, or Aluminum is preferred. Phenolic is very good at not transferring heat, but can be hard to modify. Aluminum is not as good at heat dissipation, but can be ported or modified easily to work on specific applications.

Spacer Tuning. Since each spacer will react differently on each combination there is not a right or wrong type. Spacers are a great tool to have to help dial in a new combination, or tune your racecar for varying track conditions. Swapping out a spacer is a very simple change that can have great impact on the drivability of your streetcar, or racecar. Having a couple types, and thickness of spacers around is always a good investment.
 

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Just did a search for carb spacers, and I read through a few threads started on the subject. My combo is going to be a NA 500+ olds motor. Is testing carburetor spacers something that's better to do on an engine dyno, or at the track, or possibly both? Also, any opinions on what manufacturer makes a better carb spacer than another? I have an alum HVH 1" four hole spacer right now, but after reading through some of these threads it looks like I might want to try an open spacer underneath the four hole for my new mill.
 

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Gigity
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my last N/A 364cube motor liked a 1" open on the dyno and ran hard at the top end, but I struggled getting it off the line with my clutch car. with no spacer it worked better in the first 60'
 
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