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Discussion Starter #1
Can internet "Web Hosting" be selected an ISP?

I just ran a number of Internet Speed Tests and determined there are hefty speed differences between the selected "web hosts". The speed test gives a choice of a dozen "web hosts" from Toast.net , Go Daddy, Host Rocket, Satcom Direct etc. from which to run the speed test. One in particular was faster than greased-lightning.
There are no internet service providers listed that I am familiar with such as Comcast, AT&T etc. listed to run the Speed Test. So, I presume ISP's are not web hosts? Does that mean ISPs are not "web hosts"?

Can I specify or somehow direct my web surfing goes through one of the faster hosts on my ISP?
 

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Color Me Gone'd
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An ISP provides you a "pipe" to the internet.....period. You are running the tests "beyond" or after the ISP, probably pinging websites/webhosts to your ISP, where many factors play (mileage, bandwidth, latency, code, etc/etc).

One of the ISP configuration options you "can control" with your router is selecting your primary & secondary DNS provider other than what the ISP is using. You may see a significant speed increase w/another public DNS provider, its simple to setup - best of luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Ouch, sincere thank you Smirnoff for being the one and only responder to this post out of the hundred or so that viewed it. If you didn't grasp my web savvy from my post, it's certainly "challenged".
If I'm taking your advice correctly I can alter my primary & secondary DNS provider's and unlock more speed. I just had to go look up what DNS provider was. (challenged remember). I get the feeling it will take hours if not days to grasp and act on this. Is a router the same as a modem? ... I believe I only have the later.



This is a list of Managed DNS providers in a comparison table. A Managed DNS Provider offers either a web-based control panel or downloadable software that allows users to manage their DNS traffic via specified protocols such as: DNS Failover, Dynamic IP addresses, SMTP Authentication, and GeoDNS.

An ISP provides you a "pipe" to the internet.....period. You are running the tests "beyond" or after the ISP, probably pinging websites/webhosts to your ISP, where many factors play (mileage, bandwidth, latency, code, etc/etc).

One of the ISP configuration options you "can control" with your router is selecting your primary & secondary DNS provider other than what the ISP is using. You may see a significant speed increase w/another public DNS provider, its simple to setup - best of luck.
 

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I think you should check with your provider about this feature. Although you don't have to do it through it, there are many good free and paid hosting services. But I would recommend that you still use paid hosting
 

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Its really a sad state of affairs the way the public is fooled by the big names saying there service is faster because it has 500 Mbps and then another advertises their router as able to handle everyone's wireless device at the same time.

How internet traffic is routed is the key to speed. "Speed" is a misnomer the 500 Mbps is not a speed it is actually "bandwidth" IE the amount of traffic that can be moved simultaneously. Think of it as moving cargo from say Maryland to a location in Virginia that is 15 miles away. If company A offers you 50 trucks and 5 lanes of traffic but their roads so congested that they will only allow you to take a route that goes through PA and West VA a total of 350 miles to get to VA and another company B only offers only a one lane road but you can take it pretty much directly to your destination so you only have to travel 18 miles which do you think is faster? Then to add to the problem when you take the long route you have to switch from road to road and each time you do this there is a traffic light (this is what a router/switch does, connect various paths) that further delays your journey and the picture really gets complicated.

Then on top of all that since thousands of users (in one area) may want to view the same news page at the same time lots of pages are stored at various sources along the networks. So the amount of store and forward devices available to the end user also plays a role in perceived "speed".

Then you have the whole home network hustle where one company says their wireless network is better than another and will allow all to connect simultaneously. The truth is that anyone can buy a 5 G wireless router for a 100 bucks and it will provide enough bandwidth to connect hundreds of uses in one house.

The main factors on what is called speed, is the route the provider is forced to take and the quality of the router/switches along those routes. Many is the time where a request for a page that lies 20 miles and three hops (traffic lights) away may not be available due to traffic and the request instead will literally travel 250 miles and 20 hops.

The whole thing gets pretty complicated but one thing for sure, unless you are downloading large files for later use, then without network congestion and rerouting of a request even a 5 Mbps bandwidth will be lightning fast for web-surfing.
 

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Smuck
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I fight this a lot supporting calls over the internet.
We use every trick we can to make sure voice traffic gets priority.
 
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