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Discussion Starter #1
I've seen this mentioned many times, but does it really matter? I always put mine in so that when at 40*, the 1 and 8 cap terminals are parallel with the ends of the block and not turned 40* counter clockwise from a normal #1 TDC terminal position. This would make it one tooth off, as some would say, clockwise, but it runs just fine. Hope that makes sense.

Anyway, doesnt the dist just pick up the signal of the rotor passing the terminal on the cap, therefore making it able to be in any position as long as its firing at the correct * of timing?

Sorry if thats confusing, but I always see racers set it at zero, then crank it counter-clockwise and I get told my dist is in "one tooth off"!:confused:
 

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If you're using a locked out distributor put your balancer at your max timing mark just before tdc on number 1 and drop your distributor in with the rotor pointing at number 1 on the cap. Rotate the distributor as needed to line it up.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thats exactly how I've always done it and it fires right up within a couple degrees of being right on. My question was can a dist be a tooth off? I've set peoples distributors for them and they tell me I'm putting it in a tooth off. In my opinion, there is no such thing. I've even had people tell me you have to put it at 0* to drop it in.
 

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A distributor can only be "off one tooth" during installation (if you want it facing a certain position or the same position it was previously).

Once the engine is running, and you've set the timing (with a timing light), it's no longer off one tooth, but it may not be in the exact position you want.

On crank trigger applications, turning the distributor body only adjusts "rotor phasing", but the same principal applies.

FYI: For carbureted & EFI applications, if your distributor ends up facing the "wrong" direction (aesthetics), you can remove the distributor assembly from the engine and reinstall it in the position you like without turning the inner shaft. You can remove the distributor cap and tape the rotor to the distributor body for maintaining alignment.

Danny Cabral said:
Since we discussed "rotor-phasing" in this thread, MSD has a good video on why it's important:
http://www.msdvideos.com/featured_landing.php?reset=true (Click "Tech Tips" category & "Rotor Phasing Explanation")
http://www.msdignition.com/uploaded...port/frm28392_tech_bulletin_rotor_phasing.pdf (MSD rotor phasing document)

Testing the MSD ignition box (points output-white wire & magnetic pickup-violet/green triggering):
http://www.msdignition.com/page.aspx?id=3206

With a crank trigger, turning the distributor only adjusts rotor phasing - easy.
The crank sensor sliding bracket, now does the task that turning the distributor once did:



MSD Tech Bulletin:If you’re not sure about the polarity of the pickup you are using, there is a simple test you can perform by checking the engine’s timing. Check the timing with the pickup wires connected one way, then swap the wires and check the timing again. You will notice that the timing changes significantly and may appear very erratic. The correct connection depends on the ignition control that is being used.
Analog: If you are using an analog controlled MSD Ignition such as a 6A, 6T or 6AL series, SCI series, 7AL series, MSD 8 or 10 or Blaster Ignition, the correct connection is when the timing is retarded.
Digital: When using an MSD Digital-6 or Digital-7 Plus, or the Programmable Digital-7 Ignition Controls, the correct connection is when the timing is more advanced.
 
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