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Discussion Starter #1
I thought some people here might get a kick out of this but could also give some insight or a hey you done fucked this up if they see something I did wrong.

I guess I should start off by saying my car is a pre-production Laguna Seca built in 2010 ordered for "Prod Plan-Styling" for Ford Motor Company. Go back to my birthday last September, leaving a stop light I started hearing the tapping sound and limped it home. I drained the oil and started finding little bits of metal in it.





Out came the engine and I could start working on it.



Pulled off the oil pan and found silver paint where the oil was supposed to be.



I started pulling the motor apart and found little bits of metal in every nook and cranny where oil could send them to. Pulled the shortblock apart and number 7 Rod bearing was toasted along with a couple others but number 7 was the worst out of all of them.



You can see on the crank what the #7 rod bearing did to it.



I basically ended up needing a new engine from Oil pan to intake manifold. Well maybe not intake manifold but if I'm building an engine, might as well upgrade to the Cobra Jet setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I just wanted to show some of the parts that I am getting along with updating my parts list.

I ordered a couple of non Ford parts and have been getting them in slowly and just stockpiling them until recently.

BMR Tubular K-Member - KM018

I figured this was a good opportunity to lighten up the front end of the car while the engine was out. This should remove 22 lbs from the front of the car along with giving you a lot more clearance under the engine.

BMR Radiator support with Sway bar Mounts - RS003

Again, just trying to lighten things up while retaining my front sway bar as this is mainly used as a road course car. It should save about 13lbs. off the front end.

BMR A-Arms - AA0021

Again, just trying to lighten things up. BMR claims there is less deflection in their A-Arms which is going to improve handling slightly, but these are way lighter than the factory A-Arms.

BMR A-Arm support brace - AAS-001

In talking with Kelly about these he had mentioned that for guys who are going to be drag racing their cars, they wouldn't need this as you aren't exactly putting a lot of stress on the A-Arms. For people who are going to be using their cars for road course or autocross or street driving this would make sense as you are tying the two A-arms together making them stronger and stiffer. There would be less deflection on the A-arms for improved handling.

MPR Racing Engines Billet Lower Crankshaft sprocket



This is made out of billet steel and is FAR stronger than the cast piece that Ford offers. On high boost applications, the factory sprocket has been known to break on cars with superchargers or turbochargers and will destroy your engine. Once this breaks, there is nothing holding the timing chains onto the crankshaft and thus your primary chains will have the potential to skip a bunch of teeth along the sprocket and will throw the timing off.

MPR Racing Engines heavy duty secondary timing chains



The problems with going with aftermarket cams and springs is that you may get a larger lift along with increased duration camshaft that the engineers at Ford never designed the secondary chains for. With these aftermarket cams, most will replace the valve springs that have increased spring pressure and seat pressure which will put some added stress on the secondary chains. For the most part, I think you will be ok to run the factory units but with the added RPM's and extended higher RPM's that the engine would see on a road course, I thought this would have been a good idea. I know I would have kicked myself if the cams broke on me. They feature thicker pins holding the chain links together along with thicker plates.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
TSS Billet Oil Pump Gears – JPC Racing Part # 1760 (It may be the same as TSS’s but I couldn’t find a part number on their website)



These are a must when you have the engine open.The factory oil pump gears seem to have problems with high RPMS and sudden shocks like when you hit the rev limiter. Failure of these will destroy your motor so it is another item listed under cheap insurance. TSS has a very good reputation (better than MMR's when it comes to OPGs) and they mark each one with a serial number so than can keep track of it in case one does happen to break although I haven't heard of one breaking, I'm sure it has happened though. No one is perfect.

JPC Racing 326ci shortblock

Specs on the shortblock are:
  • Offset ground crankshaft
  • Manley Lightweight I-beam rods
  • Diamond custom N/A spec pistons, stock compression w/ Teflon skirt coating and Gold Ceramic Top coating
  • Total Seal AP finish rings
  • KingHP series main bearings
  • Clevite Rod bearings
  • Coated Bearings
  • Darton Hat Style Sleeves
  • ARP hardware throught


RGR/JPC Stage 2 heads - 1295

RGR lightweight phaser deletes - ????



These are going to delete the internals of the VCT phasers which is going to end up saving a lot of rotating mass off of your cams and timing system. While not expressly heavy, you can certainly feel the difference when you hold a stock phaser along with one of these phasers in your hand, especially with the exhaust phasers. If you are locking out the phasers, you might as well go the extra step and get these as well. Anything to gain an edge against your competition right?

RGR custom grind camshafts - ????

Well, these I can't really say much about these as the cam grinds don't belong to me. I will say however that in researching cams for the coyote in N/A form, it seems that the lift, isn't the important part. The thing you want to focus on here is the duration, as this is what is going to be making the most power with these motors. If you think about it, you are only at your maximum lift for a fraction of a second but the longer you have your valves open, the more air and fuel you can get into the combustion chamber as well as the exhaust gases out of the chamber.

Just as a point, it is possible to make cams lope in these cars. These aren't RGR cams, but I just want to point that out but it is too badass not to share haha.


JPC Revised OAP - FDVA00002T

With the over axle pipes you are obviously removing the factory resonators but you are also gaining some power. With these you are going to gain somewhere around 7-15HP and when playing the N/A game, every little bit helps.

JPC Underdrive alternator pulley - 02020



This is a lightweight pulley and I can tell you that when they say lightweight, they mean LIGHTWEIGHT!!! This thing feels like a feather to be honest. Anyway, this replaces the pulley on your alternator which will slow down the alternator and increase the longevity of the alternator. JPC says that they see about a 2-4HP increase with these and on a coyote stock car these would be some BIG numbers when you have to run the same equipment as everyone else. As previously stated on a N/A build, just like with the 3V every little bit counts. You are going to need a bigger belt that is 70 7/8" belt which should be NAPA 25-060703 according to JPC. I haven't had a chance to measure this so once I do, I will confirm.

JPC Black Clutch line upgrade - CLK-B

JPC -12AN PCV fittings - 02017

Recently, Darren (the car in the video above) had been posting asking about some blowby issues and one of the suggestions was to go with larger AN lines from the valvetrain to the catch can so you aren't choking the motor and getting rid of the blow by fast enough. with this in mind, I said fuck it. I might as well get these and prevent any future issues. If it works cool, if not, no biggie right? Not to mention, this is MUCH cheaper than going with the 3 vane vacuum pump setup that you would need for road race applications.

Amazon.com: Aeroquip FCU1206 #4 Startlite Racing Hose: Automotive

The startlite hoses are 45% lighter than similar stainless steel hoses and IIRC they were something like 30g per foot lighter than the AQP Stainless steel hoses that Aeroquip sells. In the spirit of MattD ... weight savings bitch

Phenix Industries -12AN Compression Swivel Hose End Straight - J1200-3

Phenix Industries -12AN 90 degree compression swivel hose - J1290-3

Injector Dynamics ID100 Injectors - ID1000



I know that these are way overkill for my setup but if I ever wanted to go bigger and badder with the car I will be setup injector wise, not to mention I have been talking about getting an actual fuel system for the car so this is once less thing I would have to get when I go down that route.

VMP plug and play 40amp voltage booster -VMPAMPPNP

This makes wiring the voltage booster stupid simple! Just plug everything in and you are all set and I am all about convience here! Comes with everything you see here and is stupid simple.

Ford Racing Cobra Jet Setup

Cobra Jet Cold Air Intake - M-9603-M50CJ
Super Cobra Jet Monoblade throttle body - M-9926-SCJ
Cobra Jet Intake Manifold - M-9424-M50CJ

Kooks 1 7/8ths Long tube headers - 11412400

Kooks Green Catted H-Pipe - 11413610

Since I have to comply with emissions for NYS I decided to go with the Kooks green cats H-Pipe system which will tie into the existing Kooks side pipes I have. As is, the Kooks side pipes make the car fucking loud as shit and sound amazing so I am really dying to hear how they sound with the long tubes. The important part here is that these are 49 state legal so I should be all good to go with emissions.

ARP Head studs - 256-4702


ARP Harmonic Balancer Bolt Kit - 156-2502

ARP Flywheel Bolt Kit - 156-2801

Moroso Race Oil Pan - 20572



McLeod RST Clutch and Lightweight Steel Flywheel - JPC Racing Part Number - RST14BF

Since this car is mainly used for Road Racing I chose the RST over the RXT. If you are drag racing though, the RXT would be the better choice as the RST likes to glaze over on the strip unless you can properly slip the clutch with it.

I think that is everything for now but I am almost positive that I am missing things on this list so once I can find them I will update
this.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Looked to be an oiling issue by the marks on all the bearings. I pulled out 8.5 quarts so I'm assuming it lost its lubricative (if that's even a word) properties way sooner than it was supposed to.everything else was good except for the bearings. It sent little pieces of it through the engine, pulled out a bunch of bearing material from the cam journals.
 

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Looked to be an oiling issue by the marks on all the bearings. I pulled out 8.5 quarts so I'm assuming it lost its lubricative (if that's even a word) properties way sooner than it was supposed to.
An oil sample would explain everything clearly.

still have the oil?

Have any of the original containers of oil?

A lot can be learned from the analysis report

for future reference.


Yea the word you are trying to say is Lubricity.

Some oils need changing very often and some

last longer.

That Mustang engine makes a good amount of

steam so oil selection is critical.

Learning what works takes some experience as yours.

I had the same thing happen to me with my 428 CJ Mustang

way back.

I just changed the oil and poured in some FINA straight 40 weight

One pass later it was a knocker, spun a rod bearing with a fresh oil change.

I would never forget that one.

I built it all back again and found some Kendall GT1 green oil that seemed to work.

I eventually kept searching for better lubes, I decided to try synthetic and bought

some Royal Purple

Instantly shocked when the engine started, I had to actually lower the idle 300 rpm

from that oil change.

I was very impressed that synthetic made my engine idle smoother, more power, took longer to warm up, did not run as hot.

oil pressure always steady when at hot idle.

after I realized synthetic oils actually reduced internal engine friction

I was never buying conventional oil ever again.


That was in 1997

Since then I have had great results with many vehicles using synthetic

oils and filtration.


Looks like you cant wait to get that engine all together again!


I have only driven one of them once, my buddy actually let me

make a pass with him in his car, damn thing would move right on out

gear after gear, super nice feel to that engine.

Hope it all goes well for you...
 

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Looked to be an oiling issue by the marks on all the bearings. I pulled out 8.5 quarts so I'm assuming it lost its lubricative (if that's even a word) properties way sooner than it was supposed to.everything else was good except for the bearings. It sent little pieces of it through the engine, pulled out a bunch of bearing material from the cam journals.
You know way back GM had the same type of damage on brand new Callaway Corvette engines.
After that experience with SHELL oil GM went Synthetic and that is why MOBIL1 became factory fill in Corvettes.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
An oil sample would explain everything clearly.

still have the oil?

Have any of the original containers of oil?

A lot can be learned from the analysis report

for future reference.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ti1kLrzeJg#t=135

Yea the word you are trying to say is Lubricity.

Some oils need changing very often and some

last longer.

That Mustang engine makes a good amount of

steam so oil selection is critical.

Learning what works takes some experience as yours.

I had the same thing happen to me with my 428 CJ Mustang

way back.

I just changed the oil and poured in some FINA straight 40 weight

One pass later it was a knocker, spun a rod bearing with a fresh oil change.

I would never forget that one.

I built it all back again and found some Kendall GT1 green oil that seemed to work.

I eventually kept searching for better lubes, I decided to try synthetic and bought

some Royal Purple

Instantly shocked when the engine started, I had to actually lower the idle 300 rpm

from that oil change.

I was very impressed that synthetic made my engine idle smoother, more power, took longer to warm up, did not run as hot.

oil pressure always steady when at hot idle.

after I realized synthetic oils actually reduced internal engine friction

I was never buying conventional oil ever again.


That was in 1997

Since then I have had great results with many vehicles using synthetic

oils and filtration.


Looks like you cant wait to get that engine all together again!


I have only driven one of them once, my buddy actually let me

make a pass with him in his car, damn thing would move right on out

gear after gear, super nice feel to that engine.

Hope it all goes well for you...
I was going to send a sample out to blackstone labs and have it analysed but the last container I have is a oil/coolant mixture so that was a no go.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I just want to say that my Boss was built in December of 2010 so the part numbers may vary from what you might have. The best thing to always do is give your VIN# to your favorite Ford Store (in my case [email protected]) and let them look up the parts for you.

Back in May, I got a call from Eric at JPC letting me know that Rich was coming to MD for his nephews graduation from Annapolis and had dropped off my shortblock and that it was all ready for whenever I would want to come and pick it up. Not long after I sent a couple of my guys down to MD and had them pick up the motor for me and it has long since sat under a rack in one of our warehouses until I had the funding to finish the rest of the motor. Fast forward to this weekend and I almost at the finish line!

On to the good shit! For anyone interested I have these exploded view of the parts list for the Boss and GT motors (this one is the Boss motor but they mostly share the same components, just different parts and subsequently, part numbers) if you want the GT version, let me know and I can get that to you.



Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18 Show Content








[/QUOTE]
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This is my first time doing anything like this, my biggest automotive endeavor I have taken on up until this point has been changing the rear brakes on my car and swapping a turbo on one of the trucks at work so there is a lot of stuff that I put on that I realized had to come back off because I did things in the wrong order following the service manual.

Due to the fact that I have little flakes of metal throughout my entire engine I am going to be replacing most of the internal engine parts. So I hit up Steve over at Tasca and they got me a new Oil Pump.



I opened up the oil pump and pulled out the cast oil pump gears and grabbed the Permatex Assembly Lube and coated the news gears in some lube. I oriented them in the same way as the old gears came in. It took a bit of persuasion to get them in as they didn’t just drop in like the stock gears. I put a light coat of assembly lube on the new gears so that the rotating surfaces were red and covered but not too covered where you had these giant globs of lube on the gears. After rotating the gears by hand a couple of times to make sure that the assembly lube worked its way into everything I closed it up and torqued the screws to 90in./lbs. When I tightened up the backing plate I rotated the gears as well to ensure that there were no issues or binding. I forgot to mention to make sure you either buy a new oil pump pickup tube gasket or reuse the old one from the oil pump if you decide to buy a new oil pump.

Old


New


Parts used
  • TSS Billet Oil Pump Gears (JPC Racing Part #) – 1760
  • Ford 5.0 Oil Pump Part # - BR3Z-6600-A
  • Permatex Ultra Slick Assembly Lube Part # - 81950

Tools Needed
  • T30 bit
  • 3/8in. socket
  • Torque Wrench

Torque Specs
  • 90in./lbs.
I looked at the crankshaft to locate the orientation of the two flat parts on my crankshaft. In the picture you can see that the flat part is at an 11:58 position, so what you do is you rotate the gears in the oil pump so that the subsequent marks align with the flat pieces on the crankshaft.



From there all you do is slide the oil pump flat up against the block and you can put your oil pump bolts and studs into place. I even had my helper with me today! :D



Here I ran into my second bit of misfortune, my torque wrench only goes down to 240 in/lbs. and 24 ft./lbs. so I can’t torque the bolts down on the oil pump. Well, that sucks but I can torque those down later. No biggie there, shit happens I guess. That’s what I get for not planning accordingly. Proper preparation prevents piss poor performance!



Torque Specs
  • Oil Pump Bolt #1 - 8mm / Oil Pump Stud #2 - 13mm / Oil Pump Bolt #3 8mm / Oil Pump Stud #4 9mm
  • Stage 1 - Hand tighten
  • Stage 2 - Bolt #1 89 lb-in / Stud #2 18 lb-ft / Bolt #3 89 lb-in / Stud #4 177 lb-in
  • Stage 3 - Bolt #1 additional 45 degree turn / Stud 32 additional 75 degree turn / Bolt #3 additional 45 degree turn / Stud #4 additional 60 degree turn
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, I got the head studs in. I ended up having to chase the threads in 2 holes (oddly enough right next to each other) and the studs threaded into place without issue. The issue I ran into was that the Tap that ARP sells you is 3.5” long and the threads start 3.4 inches into the block. Thankfully, by the grace of god the 5/16th deep socket was the perfect size to fit the end of the tap as well as the hole.


My contraption



I damn near shit my pants trying to decide should I continue at this point and potentially fuck myself or stop. I live dangerously and kept going, thankfully one more turn and it reached the bottom.



Then I can pull it out with my magnetic extension.


Now, all the studs are in their place and ready for the heads. I’m not too certain how important this is but after screwing the studs by hand, as per ARP instructions, into the holes and touching the bottom I measured them and they were all within 2 or 3 thousands of an inch (3.556” was a common number) minus 1 which was 3.49X".



Studs are in!! I also got my head gaskets and heads in from JPC yesterday so as soon as I can find the old head gaskets I will be putting the heads on to prevent anything from falling into the combustion chamber or cooling passages.

Thread Chaser Extension
  • ARP M12x1.75 Thread cleaning tool – Part # 912-0008
  • 5/16 deep socket
  • 3/8’s extension
  • 3/8’s socket wrench
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I just want to give a HUGE thank you and a shout out to Tad @ Freedom Racing. Some of you know Tad from S197forum or and others may not. Freedom Racing has all sorts of OEM tools that you can buy or rent for a reasonable price and their service is second to none. Every time I get in touch with Tad, it is unfortunately on a weekend and usually within 15 minutes or so I have a PM back from him. Well Saturday night I went ahead and asked him a bunch of questions about certain tools and whatnot and he told me that he would run down to the shop tomorrow (on Sunday) and get me the answers. Sunday afternoon I had all the info that I needed with a special quote and everything all ready. Tad is a hell of a guy and I love Freedom Racing, everything always goes so smooth and I have never had any issues with them.

Anyway, back to the fun :)

Seeing as I now have what I need to put in the retainer plate and the rear main seal I figured now was the time to get things done. So, off comes the oil pan, pickup tube and windage tray so I can put in the retainer plate.

I open the box and pull out the necessary tools and get to work. Seeing as how I have never done this before (as pretty much everything with the build) I figured I would do a little step to step for those who have never done it before. With the retainer plate on my bench I cleaned the area where the rear main seal goes and lubricated the rear main seal along with the hole where it fits into and just positioned the seal on top of it with both indication marks and the 12 and 6 position.



I then put the tool onto the rear main seal




I then grabbed my BFH (Big fucking hammer) and hit the shaft until the seal top of the seal laid flush with retainer plate as the OEM one is.


When I get home from work tonight I will put some gasket sealer on it and install the plate onto the block.

  • Rear Main Seal Plate (Retainer) – Part # - BR3Z-6K301-A
  • Rear Main Seal – Part #- AT4Z-6701-A
  • Rear Main Seal Installer Set – Part # - 303-1250
  • Adaptor Drive Handle – Part # - 205-153
 

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Those Coyotes are some bad ass engines and they just reek of technology!!!!!

Looks like your doing a good and thorough job and it'll be interesting to see the results!!! Can't wait to see how she's going to run......Good luck with it!!!:smt023
 
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