Yellow Bullet Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Bracket racer
Joined
·
13,290 Posts
Hmmm....that's weird. I'd never even heard of that before....glad I'm not on the west coast!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
More info...

Thank you for contacting the Valley Fever Center for Excellence. As we are not in a position to advise about specific medical Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis) conditions, diagnosis or treatment, we recommend that you contact your physician to discuss your concerns.

Your primary care physician can refer you to an infectious disease specialist in your area. In addition, your physician may call The Valley Fever Center for Excellence at 520-626-6517 and consult with John Galgiani, MD, an internationally recognized expert on coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) and Director of The Valley Fever Center for Excellence. Clinic policy is physician to physician. For patients seeking medical care in Tucson, AZ, The Valley Fever Evaluation and Management Center is located at UPH Hospital at 2800 East Ajo Way, Tucson Az 85713. To make an appointment please call 520-694-8888 and their toll free number is 800-524-5928. For a Doctor Referral in Arizona please go to our website at www.vfce.arizona.edu click on the Find a Doctor tab. You will be able to Request Assistance by downloading a patient request form.

For a Doctor referral for a specific area outside Arizona please use the link below. AMA doctor search site:
webapps.¬ama-¬assn.¬org/¬doctorfinder/¬home.¬jsp

As a response to your inquiry, Valley Fever is caused by a fungus that grows in the soil primarily in the southwest deserts of the U.S. The fungal spores are released into the air and inhaled into the lungs, which begins the infection process in certain individuals known as Coccidioidomycosis. Valley Fever is most commonly diagnosed by means of a specific blood test called a cocci serology. Biopsy of tissue, chest x-ray and other diagnostic tools are used as well. Valley Fever is a fungal infection. It is primarily a disease of the lungs. The symptoms, methods of diagnosis, and treatment options are listed below.

What is Valley Fever:
Valley Fever (medical name Coccidioidomycosis) is an infection that is endemic to the southwestern desert region of the United States and parts of Mexico. Anyone who lives in or visits the endemic region (areas of low rainfall, high summer temperatures and moderate winter temperatures) may contract Valley Fever. VF is caused by the fungus genus Coccidioides in which there are now two recognized species, C. immitis and C. posadasii. The fungal spores, which grow in the soil, can become airborne when the soil is disturbed by winds, construction, farming and other activities. The infection occurs when one or more airborne spores are inhaled into the lungs by susceptible people and animals. Valley Fever is primarily a disease of the lungs. Within the lungs, the spore changes into a larger, multicellular structure called a spherule. The spherule grows and bursts, releasing endospores which develop into spherules. Valley Fever symptoms generally occur within 7 - 21 days after exposure.

Valley Fever is not a contagious disease. Second infections are rare. Peak periods for the disease are November through February. Dry, hot and windy conditions may contribute to the number of Valley Fever cases.

Symptoms of Valley Fever:
The most commonly reported symptoms of Valley Fever are fatigue, cough, fever, chest pain, generalized muscle and joint aches particularly of the ankles and knees, profuse sweating at night, and loss of appetite. There may also be a rash that resembles measles or hives but develops more often as tender red bumps on the shins or forearms. Most cases of Valley Fever (60%) are mild, with individuals having no symptoms or only very mild flu-like symptoms. These individuals may not see a doctor and usually recover with no treatment. Other cases (40%) may have more severe symptoms. Individuals with severe symptoms should see a physician and depending on the severity of infection may require treatment with antifungal medication. Although Valley Fever is primarily a disease of the lungs, if it spreads beyond the lungs, it is called Disseminated Valley Fever. Disseminated Valley Fever can spread to any organ of the body, including the skin, the joints and the brain. Cocci meningitis can be fatal if not treated.

Diagnosis:
Diagnosis is most commonly by means of a specific blood test called a cocci serology. Additionally, culture of tissue or sputum, or biopsy of tissue can provide a definitive diagnose of Valley Fever. Physicians may also use chest x-rays and other diagnostic tools to both diagnose and monitor the progress of the disease. A doctor must order these tests. Infectious Disease specialists are usually most familiar with the disease.

While positive blood test (serological) results almost always mean that a patient has Valley Fever, a third or more of patients with Valley Fever may actually have negative test results. Therefore, it may be necessary to repeat the serologies periodically. The blood test (cocci serology) measures the level of titer of antibodies to the fungus. A positive titer is usually measured or reported in dilutions of the patient's serum that continue to react to the fungal antigen. Titers are reported as 1:2, 1:4, 1:8 etc. A negative blood test does not exclude the presence of a coccidioidal infection. In early disease, because the antibody level is too low to be detected, it may be necessary to repeat the cocci serology in 2-4 weeks.

Valley Fever is frequently difficult to diagnose. Depending upon the symptoms, it may be confused with cancer, tuberculosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic fatigue syndrome and others. However, if the specific blood test (cocci serology) to measure antibodies against the fungus is performed, along with chest x-rays, and the individual has symptoms and also lives in or has a travel history to the Southwest, diagnosis can be made. The isolation in laboratory culture of the causative fungus from sputum, tissue or body fluids is diagnostic, as is the presence of the diagnostic spherules as seen in histopathology.

Cure:
There is no cure for Valley Fever. It is controlled, either by the body's natural immune system or with antifungal drug therapy. Antibiotics and steroids are ineffective in treating the disease.

Treatment:
Valley Fever is a fungal infection. In some mild cases no treatment may be required. The body's natural immune system may be able to fight off the infection. In more severe cases, antifungal drug therapy may be used to treat the infection. The type of medication used and the duration of drug therapy are determined by the severity of disease and response to the therapy. In chronic and mild to moderate disease the medications used include ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporonox), fluconazole (Diflucan) and voriconazole (V-Fend). Amphotericin B is given intravenously or inserted into the spinal fluid, for rapidly progressive disease. Antibiotics and steroids are not effective treatment against the fungal infection. Although these treatments are often helpful, evidence of disease may persist and years of treatment may be required.

Canine Valley Fever:
Dogs, cats and other mammals are susceptible to Valley Fever. Visit the Valley Fever Center website for additional information about Canine Valley Fever. If after reading the information, you find you still have questions, send an e-mail to the Valley Fever Center at [email protected]. Veterinarians at Canine Valley Fever will respond directly to your e-mail questions. Simply click this link to find more information about Valley Fever in dogs, cats and other mammals:
http://www.vfce.arizona.edu/vfid-home.htm

More Information:
If you would like more information about The Valley Fever Center for Excellence, Valley Fever or current events, please visit the official VFCE website at http://www.vfce.arizona.edu/ . The Frequently Asked Questions section may be helpful in answering some of your specific questions. On our website you will also find a read only version of our Cocci Syllabus for use by medical professionals that was prepared and published by the Valley Fever Center for Excellence.

About the Center:
The Valley Fever Center for Excellence is jointly sponsored by the University of Arizona and the Southern Arizona VA Health Care System, and depends solely on grants and contributions to continue its work. Internal Revenue Service procedure 90-12 requires that we inform you that your contribution is fully deductible as allowed by law. If you wish to make a donation, checks can be made payable to The University of Arizona Foundation and mailed to The Valley Fever Center, PO Box 245215, Tucson, AZ 85724.

We hope that this information has been helpful.
Thank you for contacting the Valley Fever Center for Excellence.

Thank you for contacting the Valley Fever Center for Excellence. As we are not in a position to advise about specific medical Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis) conditions, diagnosis or treatment, we recommend that you contact your physician to discuss your concerns.

Your primary care physician can refer you to an infectious disease specialist in your area. In addition, your physician may call The Valley Fever Center for Excellence at 520-626-6517 and consult with John Galgiani, MD, an internationally recognized expert on coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) and Director of The Valley Fever Center for Excellence. Clinic policy is physician to physician. For patients seeking medical care in Tucson, AZ, The Valley Fever Evaluation and Management Center is located at UPH Hospital at 2800 East Ajo Way, Tucson Az 85713. To make an appointment please call 520-694-8888 and their toll free number is 800-524-5928. For a Doctor Referral in Arizona please go to our website at www.vfce.arizona.edu click on the Find a Doctor tab. You will be able to Request Assistance by downloading a patient request form.

For a Doctor referral for a specific area outside Arizona please use the link below. AMA doctor search site:
webapps.¬ama-¬assn.¬org/¬doctorfinder/¬home.¬jsp

As a response to your inquiry, Valley Fever is caused by a fungus that grows in the soil primarily in the southwest deserts of the U.S. The fungal spores are released into the air and inhaled into the lungs, which begins the infection process in certain individuals known as Coccidioidomycosis. Valley Fever is most commonly diagnosed by means of a specific blood test called a cocci serology. Biopsy of tissue, chest x-ray and other diagnostic tools are used as well. Valley Fever is a fungal infection. It is primarily a disease of the lungs. The symptoms, methods of diagnosis, and treatment options are listed below.

What is Valley Fever:
Valley Fever (medical name Coccidioidomycosis) is an infection that is endemic to the southwestern desert region of the United States and parts of Mexico. Anyone who lives in or visits the endemic region (areas of low rainfall, high summer temperatures and moderate winter temperatures) may contract Valley Fever. VF is caused by the fungus genus Coccidioides in which there are now two recognized species, C. immitis and C. posadasii. The fungal spores, which grow in the soil, can become airborne when the soil is disturbed by winds, construction, farming and other activities. The infection occurs when one or more airborne spores are inhaled into the lungs by susceptible people and animals. Valley Fever is primarily a disease of the lungs. Within the lungs, the spore changes into a larger, multicellular structure called a spherule. The spherule grows and bursts, releasing endospores which develop into spherules. Valley Fever symptoms generally occur within 7 - 21 days after exposure.

Valley Fever is not a contagious disease. Second infections are rare. Peak periods for the disease are November through February. Dry, hot and windy conditions may contribute to the number of Valley Fever cases.

Symptoms of Valley Fever:
The most commonly reported symptoms of Valley Fever are fatigue, cough, fever, chest pain, generalized muscle and joint aches particularly of the ankles and knees, profuse sweating at night, and loss of appetite. There may also be a rash that resembles measles or hives but develops more often as tender red bumps on the shins or forearms. Most cases of Valley Fever (60%) are mild, with individuals having no symptoms or only very mild flu-like symptoms. These individuals may not see a doctor and usually recover with no treatment. Other cases (40%) may have more severe symptoms. Individuals with severe symptoms should see a physician and depending on the severity of infection may require treatment with antifungal medication. Although Valley Fever is primarily a disease of the lungs, if it spreads beyond the lungs, it is called Disseminated Valley Fever. Disseminated Valley Fever can spread to any organ of the body, including the skin, the joints and the brain. Cocci meningitis can be fatal if not treated.

Diagnosis:
Diagnosis is most commonly by means of a specific blood test called a cocci serology. Additionally, culture of tissue or sputum, or biopsy of tissue can provide a definitive diagnose of Valley Fever. Physicians may also use chest x-rays and other diagnostic tools to both diagnose and monitor the progress of the disease. A doctor must order these tests. Infectious Disease specialists are usually most familiar with the disease.

While positive blood test (serological) results almost always mean that a patient has Valley Fever, a third or more of patients with Valley Fever may actually have negative test results. Therefore, it may be necessary to repeat the serologies periodically. The blood test (cocci serology) measures the level of titer of antibodies to the fungus. A positive titer is usually measured or reported in dilutions of the patient's serum that continue to react to the fungal antigen. Titers are reported as 1:2, 1:4, 1:8 etc. A negative blood test does not exclude the presence of a coccidioidal infection. In early disease, because the antibody level is too low to be detected, it may be necessary to repeat the cocci serology in 2-4 weeks.

Valley Fever is frequently difficult to diagnose. Depending upon the symptoms, it may be confused with cancer, tuberculosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic fatigue syndrome and others. However, if the specific blood test (cocci serology) to measure antibodies against the fungus is performed, along with chest x-rays, and the individual has symptoms and also lives in or has a travel history to the Southwest, diagnosis can be made. The isolation in laboratory culture of the causative fungus from sputum, tissue or body fluids is diagnostic, as is the presence of the diagnostic spherules as seen in histopathology.

Cure:
There is no cure for Valley Fever. It is controlled, either by the body's natural immune system or with antifungal drug therapy. Antibiotics and steroids are ineffective in treating the disease.

Treatment:
Valley Fever is a fungal infection. In some mild cases no treatment may be required. The body's natural immune system may be able to fight off the infection. In more severe cases, antifungal drug therapy may be used to treat the infection. The type of medication used and the duration of drug therapy are determined by the severity of disease and response to the therapy. In chronic and mild to moderate disease the medications used include ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporonox), fluconazole (Diflucan) and voriconazole (V-Fend). Amphotericin B is given intravenously or inserted into the spinal fluid, for rapidly progressive disease. Antibiotics and steroids are not effective treatment against the fungal infection. Although these treatments are often helpful, evidence of disease may persist and years of treatment may be required.

Canine Valley Fever:
Dogs, cats and other mammals are susceptible to Valley Fever. Visit the Valley Fever Center website for additional information about Canine Valley Fever. If after reading the information, you find you still have questions, send an e-mail to the Valley Fever Center at [email protected]. Veterinarians at Canine Valley Fever will respond directly to your e-mail questions. Simply click this link to find more information about Valley Fever in dogs, cats and other mammals:
http://www.vfce.arizona.edu/vfid-home.htm

More Information:
If you would like more information about The Valley Fever Center for Excellence, Valley Fever or current events, please visit the official VFCE website at http://www.vfce.arizona.edu/ . The Frequently Asked Questions section may be helpful in answering some of your specific questions. On our website you will also find a read only version of our Cocci Syllabus for use by medical professionals that was prepared and published by the Valley Fever Center for Excellence.

About the Center:
The Valley Fever Center for Excellence is jointly sponsored by the University of Arizona and the Southern Arizona VA Health Care System, and depends solely on grants and contributions to continue its work. Internal Revenue Service procedure 90-12 requires that we inform you that your contribution is fully deductible as allowed by law. If you wish to make a donation, checks can be made payable to The University of Arizona Foundation and mailed to The Valley Fever Center, PO Box 245215, Tucson, AZ 85724.

We hope that this information has been helpful.
Thank you for contacting the Valley Fever Center for Excellence.

Thank you for contacting the Valley Fever Center for Excellence. As we are not in a position to advise about specific medical Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis) conditions, diagnosis or treatment, we recommend that you contact your physician to discuss your concerns.

Your primary care physician can refer you to an infectious disease specialist in your area. In addition, your physician may call The Valley Fever Center for Excellence at 520-626-6517 and consult with John Galgiani, MD, an internationally recognized expert on coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) and Director of The Valley Fever Center for Excellence. Clinic policy is physician to physician. For patients seeking medical care in Tucson, AZ, The Valley Fever Evaluation and Management Center is located at UPH Hospital at 2800 East Ajo Way, Tucson Az 85713. To make an appointment please call 520-694-8888 and their toll free number is 800-524-5928. For a Doctor Referral in Arizona please go to our website at www.vfce.arizona.edu click on the Find a Doctor tab. You will be able to Request Assistance by downloading a patient request form.

For a Doctor referral for a specific area outside Arizona please use the link below. AMA doctor search site:
webapps.¬ama-¬assn.¬org/¬doctorfinder/¬home.¬jsp

As a response to your inquiry, Valley Fever is caused by a fungus that grows in the soil primarily in the southwest deserts of the U.S. The fungal spores are released into the air and inhaled into the lungs, which begins the infection process in certain individuals known as Coccidioidomycosis. Valley Fever is most commonly diagnosed by means of a specific blood test called a cocci serology. Biopsy of tissue, chest x-ray and other diagnostic tools are used as well. Valley Fever is a fungal infection. It is primarily a disease of the lungs. The symptoms, methods of diagnosis, and treatment options are listed below.

What is Valley Fever:
Valley Fever (medical name Coccidioidomycosis) is an infection that is endemic to the southwestern desert region of the United States and parts of Mexico. Anyone who lives in or visits the endemic region (areas of low rainfall, high summer temperatures and moderate winter temperatures) may contract Valley Fever. VF is caused by the fungus genus Coccidioides in which there are now two recognized species, C. immitis and C. posadasii. The fungal spores, which grow in the soil, can become airborne when the soil is disturbed by winds, construction, farming and other activities. The infection occurs when one or more airborne spores are inhaled into the lungs by susceptible people and animals. Valley Fever is primarily a disease of the lungs. Within the lungs, the spore changes into a larger, multicellular structure called a spherule. The spherule grows and bursts, releasing endospores which develop into spherules. Valley Fever symptoms generally occur within 7 - 21 days after exposure.

Valley Fever is not a contagious disease. Second infections are rare. Peak periods for the disease are November through February. Dry, hot and windy conditions may contribute to the number of Valley Fever cases.

Symptoms of Valley Fever:
The most commonly reported symptoms of Valley Fever are fatigue, cough, fever, chest pain, generalized muscle and joint aches particularly of the ankles and knees, profuse sweating at night, and loss of appetite. There may also be a rash that resembles measles or hives but develops more often as tender red bumps on the shins or forearms. Most cases of Valley Fever (60%) are mild, with individuals having no symptoms or only very mild flu-like symptoms. These individuals may not see a doctor and usually recover with no treatment. Other cases (40%) may have more severe symptoms. Individuals with severe symptoms should see a physician and depending on the severity of infection may require treatment with antifungal medication. Although Valley Fever is primarily a disease of the lungs, if it spreads beyond the lungs, it is called Disseminated Valley Fever. Disseminated Valley Fever can spread to any organ of the body, including the skin, the joints and the brain. Cocci meningitis can be fatal if not treated.

Diagnosis:
Diagnosis is most commonly by means of a specific blood test called a cocci serology. Additionally, culture of tissue or sputum, or biopsy of tissue can provide a definitive diagnose of Valley Fever. Physicians may also use chest x-rays and other diagnostic tools to both diagnose and monitor the progress of the disease. A doctor must order these tests. Infectious Disease specialists are usually most familiar with the disease.

While positive blood test (serological) results almost always mean that a patient has Valley Fever, a third or more of patients with Valley Fever may actually have negative test results. Therefore, it may be necessary to repeat the serologies periodically. The blood test (cocci serology) measures the level of titer of antibodies to the fungus. A positive titer is usually measured or reported in dilutions of the patient's serum that continue to react to the fungal antigen. Titers are reported as 1:2, 1:4, 1:8 etc. A negative blood test does not exclude the presence of a coccidioidal infection. In early disease, because the antibody level is too low to be detected, it may be necessary to repeat the cocci serology in 2-4 weeks.

Valley Fever is frequently difficult to diagnose. Depending upon the symptoms, it may be confused with cancer, tuberculosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic fatigue syndrome and others. However, if the specific blood test (cocci serology) to measure antibodies against the fungus is performed, along with chest x-rays, and the individual has symptoms and also lives in or has a travel history to the Southwest, diagnosis can be made. The isolation in laboratory culture of the causative fungus from sputum, tissue or body fluids is diagnostic, as is the presence of the diagnostic spherules as seen in histopathology.

Cure:
There is no cure for Valley Fever. It is controlled, either by the body's natural immune system or with antifungal drug therapy. Antibiotics and steroids are ineffective in treating the disease.

Treatment:
Valley Fever is a fungal infection. In some mild cases no treatment may be required. The body's natural immune system may be able to fight off the infection. In more severe cases, antifungal drug therapy may be used to treat the infection. The type of medication used and the duration of drug therapy are determined by the severity of disease and response to the therapy. In chronic and mild to moderate disease the medications used include ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporonox), fluconazole (Diflucan) and voriconazole (V-Fend). Amphotericin B is given intravenously or inserted into the spinal fluid, for rapidly progressive disease. Antibiotics and steroids are not effective treatment against the fungal infection. Although these treatments are often helpful, evidence of disease may persist and years of treatment may be required.

Canine Valley Fever:
Dogs, cats and other mammals are susceptible to Valley Fever. Visit the Valley Fever Center website for additional information about Canine Valley Fever. If after reading the information, you find you still have questions, send an e-mail to the Valley Fever Center at [email protected]. Veterinarians at Canine Valley Fever will respond directly to your e-mail questions. Simply click this link to find more information about Valley Fever in dogs, cats and other mammals:
http://www.vfce.arizona.edu/vfid-home.htm

More Information:
If you would like more information about The Valley Fever Center for Excellence, Valley Fever or current events, please visit the official VFCE website at http://www.vfce.arizona.edu/ . The Frequently Asked Questions section may be helpful in answering some of your specific questions. On our website you will also find a read only version of our Cocci Syllabus for use by medical professionals that was prepared and published by the Valley Fever Center for Excellence.

About the Center:
The Valley Fever Center for Excellence is jointly sponsored by the University of Arizona and the Southern Arizona VA Health Care System, and depends solely on grants and contributions to continue its work. Internal Revenue Service procedure 90-12 requires that we inform you that your contribution is fully deductible as allowed by law. If you wish to make a donation, checks can be made payable to The University of Arizona Foundation and mailed to The Valley Fever Center, PO Box 245215, Tucson, AZ 85724.

We hope that this information has been helpful.
Thank you for contacting the Valley Fever Center for Excellence
 

·
The Dude Abides
Joined
·
18,430 Posts
Did you have to paste it 3 times?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,846 Posts
we race all the time at bakersfield auto speedways dirt track 2-3 times per month and except for a layer of clay dust all over yourself never had a problem
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top