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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I figure part of being a Civil War history buff is owning some original era firearms: I have two- an 1860 Colt built in 1862 and (probably) issued to the Union Army shortly after. I also have an 1858 Remington "New Model" built in 1863 and issued to the New Jersey militia (it is stamped N.J on the barrel) I would really like to own an original 1847 Colt-Walker; but with a price tag of well over 100K- I will settle for a replica.

From top to bottom
1860 Colt
1858 Remington
1847 Colt Walker. The Colt Walker was the most powerful handgun in the world from 1847 until the advent of the .357 Magnum in 1935.


All the necessary stuff to have some fun. The fake black powder makes cleaning the pistols a 10 min job- rather than an hour using real black powder. The .454 cal. balls weigh around 140- 142 grs. and leave the muzzle with a full charge of 30 grains (60 in the Colt Walker) at approx. 900- 950 fps. Due to these guns being so old (and the fact I shoot them a lot) I load them with 22 grs. I have not had the time to chronograph them- but guesstimate them around 650-800 fps.



I bought the 1860 Colt first and did not know what to expect when I received it. I assumed it would be inaccurate and "primitive" I was very pleasantly surprised. Both the Colt and the Remington have excellent triggers- I mean really excellent. I am not exaggerating when I say they are as good as my Les Baer .45. They are not quite as light as the Baer- but there is not .00001 in. of creep in either; amazing. I have also been very pleasantly surprised by the accuracy of them.

The 1860 Colt's sights are DEAD on. These two groups (both 6 shots) were fired from 7 yards using the center of the post it note as the aiming point. The two shots off to the right are from a different pistol my buddy was shooting.

The Remington also groups very good- but it hits high (I am working on some ideas how to fix this) the aiming point was the bottom post it.
http://i909.photobucket.com/albums/ac300/iangetbacktowork/1858groups_zpsk1ctbqig.jpg

Anyone else have any firearms from this era?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Must have messed the link up- here are the 1860 Colt groups



1858 Remington:

 

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Very nice.
 

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I figure part of being a Civil War history buff is owning some original era firearms: I have two- an 1860 Colt built in 1862 and (probably) issued to the Union Army shortly after. I also have an 1858 Remington "New Model" built in 1863 and issued to the New Jersey militia (it is stamped N.J on the barrel) I would really like to own an original 1847 Colt-Walker; but with a price tag of well over 100K- I will settle for a replica.

From top to bottom
1860 Colt
1858 Remington
1847 Colt Walker. The Colt Walker was the most powerful handgun in the world from 1847 until the advent of the .357 Magnum in 1935.


All the necessary stuff to have some fun. The fake black powder makes cleaning the pistols a 10 min job- rather than an hour using real black powder. The .454 cal. balls weigh around 140- 142 grs. and leave the muzzle with a full charge of 30 grains (60 in the Colt Walker) at approx. 900- 950 fps. Due to these guns being so old (and the fact I shoot them a lot) I load them with 22 grs. I have not had the time to chronograph them- but guesstimate them around 650-800 fps.



I bought the 1860 Colt first and did not know what to expect when I received it. I assumed it would be inaccurate and "primitive" I was very pleasantly surprised. Both the Colt and the Remington have excellent triggers- I mean really excellent. I am not exaggerating when I say they are as good as my Les Baer .45. They are not quite as light as the Baer- but there is not .00001 in. of creep in either; amazing. I have also been very pleasantly surprised by the accuracy of them.

The 1860 Colt's sights are DEAD on. These two groups (both 6 shots) were fired from 7 yards using the center of the post it note as the aiming point. The two shots off to the right are from a different pistol my buddy was shooting.

The Remington also groups very good- but it hits high (I am working on some ideas how to fix this) the aiming point was the bottom post it.
http://i909.photobucket.com/albums/ac300/iangetbacktowork/1858groups_zpsk1ctbqig.jpg

Anyone else have any firearms from this era?
now this is hard to believe, but trust me it's true! I worked with an electrician that actually held eight world records with black powder fire arms. One of his prized possessions was a real Whitworth sniper rifle. Extremely accurate, and at least once a year shot it at Freedom Indiana (750 yards). During a conversation with another guy who worked in another plant, he said he also had a real Whitworth rifle complete with the correct mold blocks. Russ didn't believe it was a real one, so the guy brings it in. It was the real deal, and in mint condition. As rare as they are, can you imagine seeing two at the sametime? These rifles were legit 800 yard rifles. Russ also had a couple Sharps fifty caliber rifles that were original. I've seen one of them. By the way Russ had a couple British Brown Bess rifles from the Revolutionary War period, but don't think they ever saw service over here.
gary
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I believe it Gary. I was at the rifle range about 10 years ago and saw a guy hitting an 18 in. gong every time at 600 yards with a .45-70
 

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I believe it Gary. I was at the rifle range about 10 years ago and saw a guy hitting an 18 in. gong every time at 600 yards with a .45-70
.

the bore on a Whitworth is either a twisted hexagon or a twisted octagon. The bullet mold has the hex in it, and was reputed to be a left over piece of the barrel for a perfect match. It was a Whitworth that shot Gen. Sedgewick in the head while he sat on his horse in the battle of The Wilderness in Virginia. The Confederate sniper was roughly 850 yards out and setting in a tree. They told the General to be careful as there were snipers about. He laughed at them and was dead a few minutes later.
gary
 

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Discussion Starter #9
^ The famous "they couldn't hit........."
 

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The only thing i have thats close to that is a Lefaucheux-style pinfire revolver, thats been ornately stamped CSA.
Though the practice of confederate soldiers stamping their battlefield pickups is known, I doubt this one is "genuine".
Family inheritance, so...who knows.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
The only thing i have thats close to that is a Lefaucheux-style pinfire revolver, thats been ornately stamped CSA.
Though the practice of confederate soldiers stamping their battlefield pickups is known, I doubt this one is "genuine".
Family inheritance, so...who knows.
I have some CSA- money; bonds, etc. I would REALLY like to have a pistol marked CSA (as long as it is real) I saw a Lematt for sale a few months ago- but I just won't pay 20+K for something I won't shoot. I might get around to buying a replica. 9 shot .42 cal + a 20 gauge shotgun = bad ass.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Whoops- typo .44 cal
 

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Cool collection. I'm jealous. I'd love to have any genuine civil war era piece or revolutionary way piece. Like you, I would only want one if I could fire it at least occasionally. My problem is that I'm way too hard on things. And to own something so old and original is a big responsibility. I'm not sure I would take care of it the way it should be taken care of.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Anyone who does what you do for a living would have no problem taking good care of these pistols, they are not particularly fragile. When I first bought them I shot black powder through them and that was a total PIA- that crap is not only like road tar- it is corrosive. When I switched to the fake stuff the pistols got to be a lot more fun- I can clean both in a matter of minutes. After I get them cleaned they get a light coat of oil and that is it.
 

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I have some CSA- money; bonds, etc. I would REALLY like to have a pistol marked CSA (as long as it is real) I saw a Lematt for sale a few months ago- but I just won't pay 20+K for something I won't shoot. I might get around to buying a replica. 9 shot .42 cal + a 20 gauge shotgun = bad ass.
CSA used a lot of captured rifles and revolvers during the war, plus they also manufactured quite a few. The Union Army bought a few Sharps Fifty rifles, and would almost be certain that some ended up in CSA hands. I've heard that the Navy Arms Whitworth is pretty accurate, but what kind of barrel it uses I don't know.

While on the subject, Russ has a couple Pedersoli Sharps that he rebuilt. One is a 40-60 or 45-60, and the other is a 50-110. Both are thousand yard rifles shooting off hand! I know they are as I've seen footage of him doing it. I'd be lucky to hold a four foot group. Russ shoots a 69 caliber musket at exhibitions (a smooth bore at that). Standing and shooting 65 yards, he shoots near perfect clover leafs, but the real trick is when he splits the ball on the head of a hatchet (50 yards). He told me he's only good for about six or seven shots, as the recoil is serious.
gary
 
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