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Step #1. Roll that POS to the curb and leave it there.

Step #2. Go buy a new riding mower ( not MTD )

Step #3. Go buy a new VOM ( volt ohm meter ).


You're welcome. :D
 

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No way there is 15 variations on a briggs motor on an mtd mower. They are as basic and cheap as they get. Worked on em all though middle school and high school as a first job. And the charge wire after the diode or regulator is always red on them whether it’s wired through the key switch then to solenoid or which ever variation that mtd found cheapest to use at the time. All he needs to do is verify that wire is receiving power while it’s running. Probe the circuit from past the diode/regulator and work your way back through the circuit and you will find your problem. 13-14 volts is normal. I found 90% of the time the key switch was to blame for charging issues on mtds. They used a real pos switch.
Can you read? Comprehend? I said there were at least 15 variations on SMALL ENGINE charging systems, not specifically Briggs or MTD. Point was he needed to identify what he had before he would get informed replies. The reason I say to identify what you have and not what you SHOULD have or is common to MTD is how common it is to repower mowers. I have seen countless mowers of all brands with miss-matched engines to their application.

And while you are doing your testing, you probably should mention to unplug the connector where the capacitor is. You should see battery voltage with the key on on the mower side of the connector and charge voltage at the red wire coming from the stator with the engine running. When you split your troubleshooting at the connector, you can isolate which direction to head. And if there is no voltage coming from the stator red wire - check for A/C voltage on the stator side of the capacitor - should be about 30 VAC at full throttle. They make a replacement harness with the plug and capacitor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Once again, I appreciate the good reply's and info. from you guys!

I've been trying to learn what I can before taking anything apart.

I still have some grass to cut and I'm checking on parts availability.

From the alternator chart provided, I'm certain I have a dual circuit style.

With the information generously provided, part # 696459 should be it.

Here's my concern and hopefully someone can enlighten me, please.

Briggs brilliantly ID's alternators by connector and wire color!

My connector is white but the wires from the alt are yellow and black.

Not red and black like the picture and everything posted online.

Wires from the white connector to the body are then yellow and red.

What confuses me is part # 790292 pictured with the alternator.

Voltage regulator, but it's the wire colors on it that interest me.

It has the yellow and black mentioned above along with a red wire.

Could this explain my different wire colors coming from the Engine?

A hidden voltage regulator causing the wire color change?

If so it would have to be under the flywheel or Engine cover?

Engine model # is 28N707 and type is 1166E1

Thanks again, I'm getting close!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
The excellent gasoline Engine already has a 12 V motor attached to it.
 

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More than likely the problem has to do with the metric system, a few mm here a couple of liters there
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
LOL

The metric system defies nature, I'm no fan of it.
 

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First, going off your engine #s - there are 4 possible charging circuits, with the dual circuit 696459 (592831) stator being the most common. The dual circuit "alternators" or stators have a leg of AC and one of DC. The black wire is AC and powers the lighting. The red wire has a capacitor to change the current to DC to charge the battery and power the fuel shut-off (if equipped). Some machines at this point call it good - it will provide DC voltage to charge the battery - although machines that mow big yards will tend to overcharge the battery. (I have 2 Craftsman mowers I use and 3 spare engines in my shed - all of them 28N700 series - and none of them have a separate regulator) So some manufacturers use the #790292 regulator to regulate the voltage. So OK - at this point if your engine has a regulator - the red/black wired plug from the stator plugs into the yellow/black wired plug on the regulator, and the red/black regulator connector plugs into the tractor harness, and at this point there still should be a red/black wired connector plugged into the mower. This regulator box is usually on the outside of the cover by the starter and it's case must be grounded. (if bolted to a plastic cover, look for a ground wire that didn't get re-attached during a service) So at this point going off your engine #s and your wire color description I have no idea what you have.

I guess at this point all I can say is good luck with your troubleshooting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
Thank You !!!

You've been a great help explaining things and I'll report my findings and post some pics. soon.
 

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Can you read? Comprehend? I said there were at least 15 variations on SMALL ENGINE charging systems, not specifically Briggs or MTD. Point was he needed to identify what he had before he would get informed replies. The reason I say to identify what you have and not what you SHOULD have or is common to MTD is how common it is to repower mowers. I have seen countless mowers of all brands with miss-matched engines to their application.

And while you are doing your testing, you probably should mention to unplug the connector where the capacitor is. You should see battery voltage with the key on on the mower side of the connector and charge voltage at the red wire coming from the stator with the engine running. When you split your troubleshooting at the connector, you can isolate which direction to head. And if there is no voltage coming from the stator red wire - check for A/C voltage on the stator side of the capacitor - should be about 30 VAC at full throttle. They make a replacement harness with the plug and capacitor.
Easy there with the condescending attitude. He said way at the beginning that he had an mtd with a Briggs motor. So why the hell would he even need to know about “15 different style charging systems on small engines”? And can you read and comprehend?? He said way back at the beginning of this thread he’s had the “1999 mtd” mower for 20 years and never had to do anything besides change oil and batteries. Basic comprehension would tell you he’s the original owner and would know if the engine has been swapped.

My reading and comprehension skills are crystal clear. Yours apparently are not.. 🤣
 

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Easy there with the condescending attitude. He said way at the beginning that he had an mtd with a Briggs motor. So why the hell would he even need to know about “15 different style charging systems on small engines”? And can you read and comprehend?? He said way back at the beginning of this thread he’s had the “1999 mtd” mower for 20 years and never had to do anything besides change oil and batteries. Basic comprehension would tell you he’s the original owner and would know if the engine has been swapped.

My reading and comprehension skills are crystal clear. Yours apparently are not.. 🤣
MTD's are entry level box store mowers which have been built with lowest bidder parts sourcing. Many times these, among with the AYP line - Craftsman, Husqvarna, etc., along with many other box store mowers, end up with engines and transaxles from the factory that are the second or third source and are different from the norm. This is why from the start I asked for more info. Even the engine model that was finally provided has 4 different variations of charging systems. Probably explains why you can buy charging system conversion wiring harnesses. Not knocking the gentleman for being slightly forgetful, but he also later recalled having set valves, which are beyond an oil change and batteries. From being in the automotive repair business and doing small machine repairs for 40+ years I have learned that you don't always get the full account of past repairs. So I continued to try and diagnose WHAT HE HAD by asking for more info as to wire colors for HIS specific charging circuit, and not simply the most common ones for a 99 MTD - simply because it may have been a substitute engine package from the factory, or the remote possibility of a repower. I never suggested that HE needed to know about 15 different charging systems - only that it would take more info to determine which one HE ACTUALLY HAD. The condescending started when you misread, didn't comprehend, then mistakenly tried to correct me on what I said. I read and comprehended all the important posts - the ones from GLHS60. Hope he can repair his mower in a cost effective and timely matter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
Gentlemen:

I have a small update for those who might still be following along!

As I live out in the country I haven't been to town yet to buy a volt meter/multimeter.

But, as it finally stopped raining I decided to mow the lawn and spent over 2 hrs mowing.

The machine ran fine as it always has but I got to thinking about testing the stator.

I disconnected the plug and probed it with a test light checking for any juice.

The yellow wire, that I thought should have been a red wire, produced nothing.

The black wire lit the test light at high RPM but cut out the Engine at idle.

WTF?? Poking around I found there is a broken red and black wire.

It's obviously the charge wires but broken off under the flywheel.

Hopefully I can splice them together and give it another go.

Any trick to removing the flywheel??

Thank You!!
 

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Gentlemen:

I have a small update for those who might still be following along!

As I live out in the country I haven't been to town yet to buy a volt meter/multimeter.

But, as it finally stopped raining I decided to mow the lawn and spent over 2 hrs mowing.

The machine ran fine as it always has but I got to thinking about testing the stator.

I disconnected the plug and probed it with a test light checking for any juice.

The yellow wire, that I thought should have been a red wire, produced nothing.

The black wire lit the test light at high RPM but cut out the Engine at idle.

WTF?? Poking around I found there is a broken red and black wire.

It's obviously the charge wires but broken off under the flywheel.

Hopefully I can splice them together and give it another go.

Any trick to removing the flywheel??

Thank You!!
Take the nut off with an impact. And if you don’t have a flywheel puller spray it with penetrating oil and tap it with a hammer close to the center of the flywheel all around the shaft while pulling up on it with your hand. Do not hit the shaft though. If that doesn’t work heat up the fly wheel around the shaft with a map gas torch and do the same thing with the hammer.

Your best bet is to either buy or make a puller though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Thanks!!

I have a few older automotive pullers so hopefully one will work.
 

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My MTD wasn't charging a few years ago, I remember soldering a new diode in to repair it. I think I got the flywheel off by putting the flywheel nut back on flush and hitting it with a hammer while having a prybar gently lifting under the flywheel.
 

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Gentlemen:

Any trick to removing the flywheel??

Thank You!!
Yup - this is the easy way most people familiar with small engines do it. It is a tried and true way that usually works unless someone has overtightened the nut and excessively set the wedge in the taper fit. If so - yes a puller will be needed.

Loosen the flywheel nut until the top of it is even with the end of the flywheel. With a large screwdriver or small prybar Lightly pry up under the edge of the flywheel while lightly tapping down on the flywheel and nut - make sure you tap straight down onto the nut and end of the flywheel. The flywheel should pop right up - if not, you can tap a little firmer, just be mindful you are just trying to release a taper fit and not driving a press fit shaft out. Once it pops, remove the nut and lift off the flywheel. Repair stator as necessary. Flywheel nut torque on reassembly is 65 ft/lbs on lightly oiled threads. Make sure the key doesn't pop out of position.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Gentlemen, another up date with a couple of questions please.

I really appreciate you guys helping me to understand what I'm doing.

I got the flywheel off with a 1/2" drive air impact and the gentle pry method.

The red and black wires were both broken but there was still about an inch left.

I wasn't sure if the stator was good so I reattached the wires and shrink tubed them.

They tuck neatly behind the starter so hopefully they don't break right away again.

The starter was a bit loose on the Engine so maybe that affected the stator wires??

The long bolts holding the starter were loose but I was able to tighten them up.

It starts even better than before so I guess tightening the starter back up helped.

I ran it for a few minutes with the tin off but it's charging a bit over 13 Volts!!

It started at 12.2 Volts but slowly climbed to 13+ and that's a big win for me!!

The question is, how do I tighten the flywheel bolt to 65 ft-lb?

I don't have any way to hold the flywheel while torquing.

Can I use the air impact??

Also, I think busted about 1/2 of a fin off the plastic fan.

Is it apt to fly apart or might it last for a while.

Thanks again !!
 

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Don't use an impact, just tighten it with a wrench. Jam something under it if you must. The fan blade isn't a problem.
 
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