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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the biggest concerns we have in the industry is
amperage draw / current.

We are in the process of designing a panel ampmeter,
that you could install in the dash of your racecar,
and instantly know how much amperage / current / load
was being drawn from the battery.

It will connect to the battery cable, be lightweight;
and would be an easy tool to detect faulty electrical
equipment (over current draw - i.e. starter) or if you need additional batteries / alternator / etc.

1) Would you use one if price is < $100.00?
2) Likely digital, Ok?
3) self contained unit with wiring, etc.
4) Likely in a dash mount design, easy to install in a race car,
5) Trying to record / display the MAX current draw, but be reset after each race or when power is disconnected automatically.
6) Likely a yellow LED display. ok?
7) Will also have a matching VOLT meter also available, ok?

Please email me your thoughts and suggestions:;)

[email protected]

TheV Electrical Products
 

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Would you use one if price is < $100.00?
Probably not

2) Likely digital, Ok?
Nope, can't stand digital when I'm driving down the road, especially with gauges that measure something that will be changing constantly.

3) self contained unit with wiring, etc.
Is there any other way? :lol:

4) Likely in a dash mount design, easy to install in a race car,
Again, is there any other way? :lol: Seriously though, as long as it's something like an Autometer gauge where it can fit into a mounting cup, to be used with roll bar mount cups or cowl panel mount cups, would probably be good.

5) Trying to record / display the MAX current draw, but be reset after each race or when power is disconnected automatically.
Had me right up until you said power disconnect would be an automatic reset, I'd rather reste it myself. This is one area where I think some of the current dataloggers are lacking, would really be better to have a temporary non-volatile memory.

6) Likely a yellow LED display. ok?
'Nother option please? Maybe selctable?

7) Will also have a matching VOLT meter also available, ok?
Much more useful IMO, or at least needed to perform any good diagnostics along with the volt meter.
 

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The Enemy
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One of the biggest concerns we have in the industry is
amperage draw / current.

We are in the process of designing a panel ampmeter,
that you could install in the dash of your racecar,
and instantly know how much amperage / current / load
was being drawn from the battery.

It will connect to the battery cable, be lightweight;
and would be an easy tool to detect faulty electrical
equipment (over current draw - i.e. starter) or if you need additional batteries / alternator / etc.

1) Would you use one if price is < $100.00?
2) Likely digital, Ok?
3) self contained unit with wiring, etc.
4) Likely in a dash mount design, easy to install in a race car,
5) Trying to record / display the MAX current draw, but be reset after each race or when power is disconnected automatically.
6) Likely a yellow LED display. ok?
7) Will also have a matching VOLT meter also available, ok?

Please email me your thoughts and suggestions:;)

[email protected]

TheV Electrical Products
I like the idea.
 

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Problem. Where are you going to take a reading, how much amperage the alternator is putting out, or how much the car is pulling from the battery.

A volt guage will tell you all the same answers you are looking for.
 

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I am interested, my car still has the original fuse board,1965, I only feel comfortable running a fuel pump, seems I loose power sometimes running anything else, I have been wondering if there is a 6 fuse panel I could mount in the trunk and run off battery.
 

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not a bad idea but it could be an issue if it were to fall in wrong hands i have 2 clamp on ones i use one up to 1000 amps and oone for up to 20 amps there nice to have when your diagnoseing cirtin problem but some would use it for what it wasent designed for
 

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Problem. Where are you going to take a reading, how much amperage the alternator is putting out, or how much the car is pulling from the battery.

A volt guage will tell you all the same answers you are looking for.
Yup, voltage depression shown on your data logger will tell you the same thing.
 

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Roll Tide!
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sounds like something you would use once, or very rarely (in a race car application). I have a clamp on fluke dc ammeter that records highest amp draw...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
No, a voltmeter will NOT tell the amount of load or current rate(amps) being drawn out of the battery. The voltmeter tells you the remaining force available. i.e. a defective fan motor drawing 50 amps from the battery can be easily detected with an amperage reading. Knowing the amperage demand on the car is vital to determining the capacity and design of the battery and / or an alternator. I understand that if the resistance stays the same,
you can determine the amperage draw from the change in voltage;
but wouldnt it be easier just to have an ampmeter tell you the demand?
 

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If you know the internal resistance within the battery, along with loaded and unloaded voltage, you can easily calculate amperage.

This assumes that the manufacturer properly rates the internal resistance of the battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Agreed;
so how many people on the forum already know the amperage draw on each run - since we manufactures do provide the IR on a batteries upon request? (Most do NOT know IR rating of THEIR own battery, only 2-3 in 10 clients and callers can even guess-timate the amperage draw on their vehicle thru a run, so my guess is MOST dont know the IR of the battery) - thus an ampmeter to possibility locate current demand from individual devises. Much easier than calculating with voltage and an IR figure many are not familar with.

Our idea is that if you know amperage / load normally ran XX amps, and all of a sudden it increased (yes, = voltage drop) -
you would easily know what device(s) were running at the time;
and find the one causing increase in amperage (and decrease in voltage).

Many users are not running a datalog devise either;
and hopefully soon we will be able to release our current voltage logger with an amperage logger and reading to complement the data and graphs. (For < $125.00)

The meter still in the development stages, so market doesnt need one, we wont supply one.

IF we know the current / amperage / load from a client,
we find it is easier to suggest the right battery / batteries and
/ or size of an alternator.

Selling a battery or alternator with too little capacity is a recipe for disaster.

Thank you all for your input, and we will talk your comments into our plans.:smt102
 

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Would not be too useful in most cases. A current meter does have it's uses, but is not normally useful in race cars or performance cars on a permanently installed basis.
1. it will not tell you if you need a larger battery
2. it will not tell you if your starter draw it excessive
3. it lacks either low current resolution or high current resolution

Most batteries have more than sufficient reserve capacity for use in race cars with only a slight recharge every several rounds.

Street performance cars use alternators and regulators that will replace the energy removed from operation of the car and its accessories, except maybe the largest sound systems or electric over hydraulics. The current requirement will vary constantly, like just turning on the fan or pump, or air conditioning in a street car.

A simple voltage check will tell you the state of charge during vehicle use and and if you are having trouble with discharge or shorts between uses, a digital or analog VOM will be more valuable than a dash installed current meter.

If you are having trouble, consult a professional and get it fixed correctly.

There are seldom, if ever, electrical problems when a properly installed and wired electrical system needs a current meter. Most drivers cannot interpret the information anyway.
Example: excessive starter current draw,,, It worked fine yesterday and now the meter reads higher current today and the engine turns over slower. Is there something wrong? The current drawn from the starter is dependent on the state of battery charge, temperature of the engine and ambient operating temperature, engine mechanical issues, electrical connections, etc.. So what's wrong?? Is it the battery charge, at a lower battery charge, what will be the draw? How about with a bad battery connection? You get the point.

Just one more waste of money and accessory to fail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
1. it will not tell you if you need a larger battery

Yes, every day we help clients determine with their estimate amperage draw which battery they need to maintain the
voltage they desire.

2. it will not tell you if your starter draw it excessive

Yes, it could tell you was starter draw is, during cranking.

3. it lacks either low current resolution or high current resolution

Our UltraLITE batteries have high (over) current protection built in.
 

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I definatly wouldn't buy an Ammeter from someone that doesn't know how to spell it either.

I see Ammeters as a waste of money to stick in your dash, they don't tell you a thing.

I bought a car that had a stock ammeter in the dash, yeah it wasn't all fancy and digital, but it said the alternator charging the car, which was not true, the voltage was under 13 V when "charging". I changed to a Volt meter and have been able to pick up on problems MUCH sooner than if I had an ammeter install.
 

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While you seem to be stuck on ammeters, and yes the ammeter can be used to measure starter draw. Just because it can be, the bigger question is, does everyone need it. Like I explained earlier, the average person lacks the technical knowledge to evaluate the readings. Current without the voltage at the same instant is useless. If you doubt the logic, go out and piss on a car battery then go piss in an electric fence.... I'm selling tickets to this one..

Voltage, current and resistance are in direct relationship to each other (E=IxR) you must know all three parts of the equation at the time of measurement, to make it meaningful.

Now, assume you have an MSD ignition in your car, the current output changes, with the change in RPM, to the tune of 1 amp per 1000 rpm. So now you have just added one more piece to the equation.

Put meaningful devices on you vehicles. Dump the junk and spend the extra money you would have on the junk and buy better parts or have a real professional repair or install them. You will be money ahead in the long run.

If you have electrical questions you can alway ask me or PM me. I am a journeyman certified electronics technician/engineer of almost 40 years, a network engineer and mechanic. I will help get you pointed in the right direction. I will not fix it for you.

Use the right tools for the right job... in most cases it will be your eyes and brain!!!
 

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Just one more waste of money and accessory to fail.
Exactly! In fact, a failed ammeter is how I got the GMC in the first place. The ammeter shorted out, and was mounted in the dash. It went to direct ground, frying every wire in the harness and blowing up the battery. This was with an Auto Meter gauge. The owner at the time needed a vehicle asap, and I traded him my 65 Chevelle.

After that, it became painfully obvious to me that an ammeter was a horrible idea to have.

Not only could it fail and keep the vehicle from running, but it could also wipe out the wiring harness and cause a fire in the battery.
 
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