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Before I hire the local AC company to come out and blow out my attic drain with a CO2 charge because my AC unit is weeping from the overflow vent, is there anything I can do myself? What can I put in the drain pan to help prevent algae or other junk from backing clogging up that drain line.
 

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I use compressed air. My air handling unit is in the garage and has a clean out "Tee" with a small vertical section where it turns down. I take some plastic tubing (like what you buy at HD) with OD that fits inside, push it down past the Tee and then blow air thru it with my air gun. It doesn't have to seal tight to work unless you have a serious blockage. After this I temporarily partially plug the discharge end so it will barely leak and slowly pour a Clorox/water mix (1/4-1/2 cup of Clorox - 2 gallon water) down the hole thru the tube until the line it totally full. Seal the discharge and let it sit for 10 minutes or so.

Basically what you are trying to do here is get the line completely filled with the mix and let it sit long enough to kill most of the organic growth which is a real problem in humid Central Florida. Then you open the discharge, blow it out again and then flush with fresh water. This keeps it clean for a long time.
 

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You can put small pieces of pool chlorine in the pan every once in awhile.I put whole tabs in a small stream/spring that pops up out of the ground over here to keep the rockstar algae down.
 
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I put shut off on my drain line close to the unit and a hose bib past that. Shut the valve off and hook up the hose and blow the line out. Pull the panel and clean the pan out and wash it out.
 

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Put a little drain clearer (draino, red streak, liquid plumber) in the trap after you blow it out, it’ll eat the rest of the sludge up
 

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I was told by an a/c guy to put white vinegar in the drain once month. Not sure it works as I still see the white crud in there from time to time
 

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I would put a condensate pump on it as close as possible to the coil..

natural draining a/c drains just breed shit and plug up

I have twin a/c’s that both have pumps. I have a big diameter clear plastic loop hose off the coil where any shit will collect and I can easily see it.

don’t have to do much…it’s basically maintenance free. If I see some crud in the clear hose I give it a couple squeezes and it breaks up, gets dumped into the condensate pump and is pumped outside

and never use hard plastic this isn’t clear for a drain. You’ll never know what the hell is going on
 

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Plumbing a HVAC condensate drain line into the house plumbing drain system is against code in my area to keep sewer gas from being drawn into the HVAC system. Even putting in a trap is no good since they will dry up in the winter. You should have 2 separate drain lines, the primary drain line going outside usually near the condenser and another one coming off the emergency drain pan that empties into a conspicuous area like over a window where it can be seen if the system is in a attic to let you know the primary drain line is clogged up.

I would personally drain the primary into a condensate drain pump that has a float switch built into it to shut the condenser 24v control wiring off if it stopped working. You can also and should put some kind of device on the drain pan that does the same, there are several different types of overflow devices you can use. They are very simple to install, just be sure to kill the power to the system to keep from shorting out the transformer when you hook the overflow device into the 2 wire 24v wiring to the condenser contractor.
 

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Never in my life have I ever had to clean out a a/c drain, sounds like y'alls drain lines are too small.
It's a common problem if you live in a high humidity area.
 
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Memphis, Tennessee is home to some of the most humid weather I've ever lived in, it's almost as bad as Florida.
I don't disagree. I lived in Manchester TN around 60 miles south for a little over a year so I am familiar with the weather. I also know besides being humid, in Central Florida the HVAC runs for more hours during the summertime and is still being used for cooling sometimes until November and starting again in at least by March. Bottom line is there is more moisture in the drain over the course of the year with little time for any extended time for it to ever dry.

Design hasn't been discussed and is actually more of a factor. In Florida where most single family homes are single story the air handler is typically on the first floor. The drains are commonly routed down a few feet under the slab and then outside where it turns up and is extended just above grade level then terminates with a short "goose neck". This means the section under the slab stays filled with water, probably all year round because even when the AC isn't running the water is very slow to evaporate. This is much different then many designs I've done for commercial buildings in Florida. Air handlers on the roof or elevated above the ceiling and the drain lines all slope down on the horizontal runs then vertical to where they drain so there never is any standing water.
 

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I don't disagree. I lived in Manchester TN around 60 miles south for a little over a year so I am familiar with the weather. I also know besides being humid, in Central Florida the HVAC runs for more hours during the summertime and is still being used for cooling sometimes until November and starting again in at least by March. Bottom line is there is more moisture in the drain over the course of the year with little time for any extended time for it to ever dry.

Design hasn't been discussed and is actually more of a factor. In Florida where most single family homes are single story the air handler is typically on the first floor. The drains are commonly routed down a few feet under the slab and then outside where it turns up and is extended just above grade level then terminates with a short "goose neck". This means the section under the slab stays filled with water, probably all year round because even when the AC isn't running the water is very slow to evaporate. This is much different then many designs I've done for commercial buildings in Florida. Air handlers on the roof or elevated above the ceiling and the drain lines all slope down on the horizontal runs then vertical to where they drain so there never is any standing water.
Okay, I've still never had any issues with a a/c drain stopping up and I've owned 4 different homes in this area, and just for the record, the heat/humidity start around late April and runs through to late October sometimes.
 
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