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This is the latest round of fake news concerning COVID, huh? I’ve been told our hospitals are about to collapse. It hasn’t happened. In fact, this piece of fear porn has been manufactured before. It centers on Intensive care units, which are almost always near capacity, even prior to the pandemic. If they’re not, the hospital loses money.

Enter National Public Radio that peddled a story that wasn’t true at face value. The narrative was that the ICUs are so packed with COVID patients that it resulted in his death. He reportedly visited 43 and was turned away. It wasn’t COVID that killed him; it was a heart ailment. Yet, midway through the story, you can see where things go off the hinges. It’s classic misinformation (via NPR)
NPR Report:
Ray DeMonia, 73, was born and raised in Cullman, Ala., but he died on Sept. 1, some 200 miles away in an intensive care unit in Meridian, Miss.
Last month, DeMonia, who spent 40 years in the antiques and auctions business, suffered a cardiac emergency. But it was because hospitals are full due to the coronavirus — and not his heart — that he was forced to spend his last days so far from home, according to his family.
"Due to COVID 19, CRMC emergency staff contacted 43 hospitals in 3 states in search of a Cardiac ICU bed and finally located one in Meridian, MS.," the last paragraph of DeMonia's obituary reads, referring to the Cullman Regional Medical Center.
"In honor of Ray, please get vaccinated if you have not, in an effort to free up resources for non COVID related emergencies ... ," the obituary reads. "He would not want any other family to go through what his did."
NPR was unable to reach the DeMonia family. A spokesperson for Cullman Regional Medical Center, who declined to give specifics of Ray DeMonia's case, citing privacy concerns, confirmed to NPR that he was transferred from the hospital but said the reason was that he required "a higher level of specialized care not available" there.
So, they pushed a story without getting the full picture from the family and they got a statement from the original hospital DeMonia was admitted to which shredded the narrative NPR tried to toss out here.

‘A Man Died After Being Turned Away From 43 ICUs At Capacity Due To COVID, Family Says’ is the headline.
Well, he was admitted. He was transferred because the original hospital wasn’t properly equipped to give him the care he needed. That’s hardly being turned away.
The story is false. NPR probably knew it was false but ran with it anyway because it was a noble lie. It’s still a lie, kids. The liberal media intentionally misleads and knows it can get away with it.

 

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There was a story a couple weeks ago about someone who was shot 6 times when someone broke into their house - the hospital admitted him, but couldn't treat him for 7 days because they were over capacity due to covid.

I couldn't stop laughing at the article, the hospital would have triaged him thru over someone with the flu...
 

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I just got an email from a local hospital warning me they were at capacity

Patients with nonemergent medical conditions encouraged to visit their physician offices or urgent care sites

All of Beaumont Health’s 10 emergency departments are experiencing extreme numbers of patients seeking medical attention and the health system is encouraging patients to consider all options for treatment and evaluation, such as urgent care, when appropriate.

While some of the patients are seeking care for COVID-19, the overwhelming majority of the patients currently coming to Beaumont’s emergency departments have other medical conditions and concerns. In addition, the health system is experiencing a blood shortage as well. Beaumont encourages everyone to donate blood.



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Cullman is approximately 60 miles north of Birmingham. The University of Alabama at Birmingham hospitals (some of the best of the south) have a cardiac ICU that has 20 beds. I am not a health care worker, but I would be surprised if they filled that up with Covid patients or allowed even one in there risking infecting cardiac patients health. If it was full, it was due to actual cardiac cases. And if the only place they could send him was Meridian, MS, he was going to die anyway. I would not go near that area for health care- especially bypassing the 5 or so hospitals in Birmingham.
 
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