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Discussion Starter #1
Have access to a brand new set of A1 rod bolts that are the same length and everything as the ARP 2000 bolts in my Eagle BBC rods. They are the AMS55844 material that is like 285,000 psi. Just curious if anyone has used something other than the recommended bolts by the rod manufacturer. Not a big deal to spend 140 on a set of L19s but these are given to me to use if they will work. They are both 1.800 underhead length, 7/16 thread and the shoulder that goes in the cap dowel is the exact same diameter as well. Just looking for input on this.
 

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The Phantom Machinist
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Possible the big ends will need rehoned if torque or stretch are different.
I’ve seen Eagle rods that don’t repeat on size with the same bolts/caps pulled and reinstalled.
It’s not uncommon, if not almost necessary, to trim the cap and re-hone the rods from new.
New bolts with a different clamping value would be likely.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm gonna have them resized. It's due a freshen up and a buddy had these bolts which are quite a bit stronger than 2000s, or l19s. I just didnt know if it was uncommon to use a different brand bolt than what each rod company comes with as long as it was the same dimensions.
 

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I bought a brand new set of rods once that had UPGRADED bolts installed. But, thing is... that's all they did. They popped out the old ones, and installed the new ones. Good thing I had them checked, as they were HORRIBLE, and ALL OVER THE PLACE.

If you swap to different bolts, AT LEAST get the rods checked by someone who is REPUTABLE. They will likely need re-done.

In addition, don't short cut anything... Machine Work is NOT a place to bargain shop!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well further research is that these are an ARP 3.5 material. I have the stretch numbers and of course I have a very good machine shop that can take care of everything. Is 3.5 a good material for a lighter weight rotating assembly but is sprayed a moderate amount of nitrous?
 

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Well further research is that these are an ARP 3.5 material. I have the stretch numbers and of course I have a very good machine shop that can take care of everything. Is 3.5 a good material for a lighter weight rotating assembly but is sprayed a moderate amount of nitrous?
I’m curious to know what they call for stretch.
 

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ARP 3.5 and AMS5844 are the same material. It is called MP35N and has a minimum tensile raitng of 260 ksi and it is almost impossible for it to corrode due to being 35% nickel, 20% chrome and around 35% cobalt. We used a lot of this material in the Aerospace fastener industry I used to work in.

As long as you have the proper stretch measurements it should be fine. You will absolutely have to resize the rods. The bolt is going to place more clamping load on the rod housing and will distort it differently than your original bolts.
 

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In my opinion you will never need more than an ARP 2000 bolt in an Eagle Rod. Those rods will come apart way before the ARP 2000 bolt will let go.
 

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Wart Remover
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Just out of interest, what shop are you using?

The 2000 bolt is plenty. Whatever you do, don't put L19's in there!
 

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Just out of interest, what shop are you using?

The 2000 bolt is plenty. Whatever you do, don't put L19's in there!
Why not ?
Cause everybody is scare of the hydrogen embrittlement that can come from touching the bolt with your fingers or moisture....l personally never had a problem... Where gloves, keep the bolts oiled.

I've seen the bolt in a rod that spun a bearing bad bend and not break.......
 

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Cause everybody is scare of the hydrogen embrittlement that can come from touching the bolt with your fingers or moisture....l personally never had a problem... Where gloves, keep the bolts oiled.

I've seen the bolt in a rod that spun a bearing bad bend and not break.......
I never had an issue with them either. It was all I used in my engines and back when I worked at the machine shop, it was all we used in the race engines. Granted there are other options now, but at the time, Eagle rods with the L-19 bolts was the affordable upgrade.
 

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Just out of interest, what shop are you using?

The 2000 bolt is plenty. Whatever you do, don't put L19's in there!
Why not ?
Cause everybody is scare of the hydrogen embrittlement that can come from touching the bolt with your fingers or moisture....l personally never had a problem... Where gloves, keep the bolts oiled.

I've seen the bolt in a rod that spun a bearing bad bend and not break.......
Roger that. thank you.
 

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Wart Remover
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Why not ?
When you get a set of L19's, you WEREN'T the first person to handle that bolt.

At least in the Mountain Motor P/S stuff, hydrogen embrittlement caused us a few issues. Now obviously not everything is close to that load, power and RPM. But why use a bolt that can have issues? Even after the bolt is in an engine, especially an engine that isn't disassembled often, it can become prone to that. Also, there was some metallurgy issues about 5-6 years ago with that bolt, so we just went a different route. L19 is a "filler" bolt; many cheaper ones will do just fine, and engines above that level can usually benefit from a better bolt, as cost isn't as much of a concern.
 
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